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By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | January 11, 2006
Celera Genomics Group, the Rockville biotech that won international fame in the race to map the human genome with scientist J. Craig Venter at the helm, has again outlined plans to reinvent itself since those heady days in 2000. Celera, a division of Applera Corp. of Conn., said yesterday that it will abandon internal drug development efforts to focus on discovering proteins for use by other drugmakers and on creating products to diagnose diseases, an area of recent revenue growth for it. This will be Celera's fourth incarnation in its continuing quest for profitability.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1997
Human Genome Sciences Inc. of Rockville said yesterday that its licensing agreement with SmithKline Beechum PLC has been changed to make it easier for both to license marketing rights for medical diagnostic devices based on Human Genome's gene discoveries.The revised agreement allows SmithKline to license to other companies medical diagnostic products it develops based on Human Genome's technology.Human Genome said the new agreement also allows it to develop and market medical diagnostic tools, which would complement drug or other treatments it develops in the future.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
Human Genome Sciences Inc., the Rockville company mapping genes and researching their role in regulating body functions and diseases, expects to launch a human clinical trial late this year on its first potential medical therapy to spin out of its research."
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
As President Clinton got ready to announce at the White House last month that Celera Genomics Group had discovered the genetic directions for building and running a human body, the company's chief executive filed in with hundreds of others and took a seat to the side of the stage, three or four rows from the rear. Tony White could have had a spot at the podium, one that Celera President Craig Venter shared with Clinton. But it was his way of remaining behind the scenes, a curiously anonymous chief executive in a spectacularly visible company.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1998
Human Genome Sciences Inc. said yesterday that Takeda Chemical Industries Ltd. of Japan has licensed the Japanese marketing rights for a new cancer treatment drug that is under development.The Japanese pharmaceutical and health care products concern paid Human Genome an undisclosed option fee, and will be required under the agreement to pay the Rockville biotechnology company royalties on sales.Takeda exercised rights to market Human Genome's myeloid progenitor inhibitory factor-1, which is being developed as a treatment to limit the ill effects of chemotherapy.
BUSINESS
By Abbe Gluck and Abbe Gluck,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1996
Human Genome Sciences Inc. and SmithKline Beecham PLC said yesterday that their combined efforts to use genetic coding to develop new drugs had generated so many opportunities that they have invited three more companies to share the work.In addition to renegotiating their own 1993 agreement, Human Genome, the Rockville-based biotechnology company, and SmithKline of London said they will receive at least $140 million for opening their alliance to other pharmaceutical companies eager for access to their human gene research.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1997
Breaking off a historic alliance between a biotech start-up and a basic research foundation, Human Genome Sciences Inc. and The Institute of Genomics Research (TIGR) yesterday ended a 5-year relationship in which Human Genome tried to invent new drugs based on TIGR's cutting-edge work in determining the basic structure of human genes.The deal saves Human Genome $38.2 million it would have owed TIGR for future research, and gives the nonprofit TIGR the freedom to pursue other funding, and to publish its research more quickly.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1998
Human Genome Sciences Inc., the Rockville biotechnology firm, will announce today that it is moving an experimental treatment to prevent the toxic effects of chemotherapy into larger human trials to assess the drug's effectiveness.The company's myeloid progenitor inhibitory factor treatment is being developed to prevent the toxic effects of chemotherapy on bone marrow.Kate DeSantis, a company spokeswoman, said the company found in a small study on healthy volunteers that the treatment had no significant side effects.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
Human Genome Sciences, a Rockville company that is developing gene-based therapies for various illnesses, reported a third-quarter net loss of $68.9 million yesterday -- more than five times its loss a year ago -- largely because of one-time expenses related to the conversion of debt to equity. The company also reported decreased revenue from its collaborative contracts with pharmaceutical companies, saying they brought in $642,000 in the quarter that ended March 31, compared with $1.4 million a year ago. The decrease was related to the expiration of a three-year contract with the former Pharmacia & UpJohn Inc., which was using HGS genomes in its own drug-development efforts, Chief Financial Officer Steven C. Mayer said.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1997
Human Genome Sciences Inc. said yesterday that it has discovered the genetic blueprint for a bacterium that is a leading cause of pneumonia and meningitis. The breakthrough could help researchers enormously in the race to develop a class of drugs to tackle the growing problem of drug-resistant infections.Comparing similarities and variations in the blueprints "should collapse the time it takes for drug discovery and help pick better targets on microbes to interfere with their actions," said Craig Rosen, senior vice president for research and development at Rockville-based Human Genome.
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