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NEWS
By Alireza Jafarzadeh | April 16, 2012
After a yearlong round of escalating international economic sanctions and rhetoric, the regime in Iran has finally come around to raising expectations that it will take some constructive steps in reining in its nuclear weapons ambitions. But this cycle of threat and accommodation has played out before, and its outcome should have been predictable. According to the information provided by Iranian dissidents obtained from their sources inside the regime, as well as the U.N.'s atomic watchdog agency, the nuclear genie is out of the bottle in Iran, and the regime's genius for delay and subterfuge will only give it the time to complete the dash to a workable weapon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore children's book author Elisabeth Dahl used to walk two or three miles just so she could hang out at the Library of Congress, reveling in the Paris Opera House style-architecture, the 23-karat gold-plated dome and the breathtakingly extensive archives that includes the personal papers of Thomas Jefferson. Dahl married a librarian who works now at Towson University, and the couple celebrated their wedding in the Enoch Pratt Free Library . So 45-year-old writer couldn't be more thrilled that her first published book, a children's novel called "Genie Wishes," was chosen to represent the State of Maryland at the 14 t h annual Library of Congress National Book Festival on Saturday.
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BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | October 4, 1990
Some customers of Prodigy, the computerized shopping, news and information service, apparently would rather switch than fight.According to GEnie, a competing service in Rockville, hundreds of subscribers to Prodigy, based in White Plains, N.Y., are switching to GEnie to protest Prodigy's plans to limit the number of free electronic mail messages to an average of one a day -- 30 a month -- starting next year."
NEWS
June 19, 2013
Baltimore city residents will be paying a 9-percent tax on the bottle for alcoholic beverages ("Give us a break from City Hall's fee fever," June 13). That means a 30-pack of beer will cost $1.69 more than in Baltimore County after the distributor takes 5 cents a case! Thank you, mayor and City Council! Joe Gordon, Baltimore The writer is owner of Genie's Liquors.
NEWS
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 1997
"The Djinn in the Nightingale's Eye," by A.S. Byatt. Random House. 270 pages. $19.Gillian Perholt, the star of A.S. Byatt's opulent new book of fairy tales, "The Djinn in the Nightingale's Eye," is on the down-slope of middle age, an academic working the conference circuit, naked and alone in a luxury hotel room. Regarding herself in the mirror, she sees "her death advancing towards her, its hair streaming dark and liquid, its eyeholes dark smudges, its mouth open in its liquescent face in fear."
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | November 4, 1992
It happened almost four years ago. Or so the legend goes.A tall, lanky man walked a lonely beach near Kennebunkport in Maine.He was deep in thought, head down, hunched into the winter wind.Then he stopped. Something caught his eye. He bent over and picked up an oddly shaped bottle that had washed ashore.He looked at it, shook it, then twisted out the cork stopper.Smoke puffed from the bottle. Startled, the man dropped it and jumped back.The smoke poured out, became thicker, then whirled and materialized as a human form that yawned and stretched.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Orange County Register | November 20, 1992
Look out, Aladdin. This time when you rub your magic lamp, Robin Williams pops out of the spout, in Disney's manic new animated version of the classic fairy tale.And Mr. Williams' quick-change-artist of a genie plunges the film "Aladdin," which opens at most theaters Wednesday, into more whacked-out cartoon comedy shtick than the ancient Arabs and Persians ever bargained for."We wrote the script with Robin Williams in mind," said producer-director John Musker, who along with Ron Clements, Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio expanded the screenplay from an original treatment by the late Howard Ashman.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | April 6, 2003
FUND INVESTORS are wishing they had known back when they started investing what they know today. They also wish they could start over, that the market would turn around, that they could have better market timing or more patience or more to save. That's where the genie of the mutual fund comes in. As with any good genie, you get three wishes, but there are rules: No wishing to get your money back. Like love - remember, every genie in every tale can't make someone fall in love - recouping your losses is something you have to earn.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 25, 1992
"Aladdin" conjures up a story Scheherazade wouldn't have thought up in 2,002 Arabian nights. For how could even the world's greatest storyteller have imagined a Robin Williams?Is this a man or a spirit or a deeply dysfunctional human being? Like, maybe he is a genie. That certainly would explain the endless torrentof personality that seems to gush through his presence, on screen or off, the literally unbelievable way in which he takes up and puts down new voices, rhythms and world views within the confines of a single sentence or two.Thus the big news in "Aladdin" is all Robin Williams.
SPORTS
By Tim Brown and Tim Brown,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 22, 2005
I read the book, spoke to the commissioner and his lieutenants, phoned sports agents and field managers, a scout and a professional trainer who spotted Mark McGwire's bench presses for seven years. I studied the writings of composed or hysterical colleagues and watched a New York news conference. I went to the gym every morning and listened to the men who had used steroids themselves or been tempted. I heard the old guys go on about the integrity of the game and what Hank Aaron or Mickey Mantle might have done, given the same benefits of medicine and science and moral capriciousness.
NEWS
By Alireza Jafarzadeh | April 16, 2012
After a yearlong round of escalating international economic sanctions and rhetoric, the regime in Iran has finally come around to raising expectations that it will take some constructive steps in reining in its nuclear weapons ambitions. But this cycle of threat and accommodation has played out before, and its outcome should have been predictable. According to the information provided by Iranian dissidents obtained from their sources inside the regime, as well as the U.N.'s atomic watchdog agency, the nuclear genie is out of the bottle in Iran, and the regime's genius for delay and subterfuge will only give it the time to complete the dash to a workable weapon.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
Eugenia A. "Genie" Kennedy, a former Peace Corps volunteer and teacher, died Jan. 7 of multiple organ failure at her Bel Air home. She was 82. A daughter of a businessman and a homemaker, Sarah Eugenia Asbury, who did not use her first name, was born and raised in Delta, Pa. After graduating from Delta High School in 1947, she earned a bachelor's degree in business education in 1951 from Russell Sage College in upstate New York....
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | November 4, 2008
They live on the same floor of the same Massachusetts nursing home now - the 94-year-old former Rose Popolo; her 85-year-old sister, Sadie Bell; their 83-year-old brother, Frank Popolo, and his 90-year-old wife, Aunt Genie - so I get to see them all in a single visit. On a recent Saturday evening, I coax all but Aunt Genie, who's asleep in her room, down the hall to a faux-Colonial sitting room. I pull up chairs. We sit. We talk. My mother is quiet, but she's smiling. She's very happy about the pizza I just delivered.
SPORTS
February 11, 2008
So what have we learned from Kevin Hart? Probably nothing, but he has provided us with a teachable moment. Hart is the young man from Nevada who joined the throng across the country in staging a news conference around national signing day to announce that he had made a tough choice between California and Oregon and decided he would play football at Cal. Except the offensive lineman had not been recruited by Cal. Or Oregon. Or any other major college. Hart had made the whole thing up, but that didn't stop him from getting media coverage and even getting ranked by one of the recruiting services, though he apparently doesn't have big-time college football talent.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | January 23, 2008
Genie Johns was working 12-hour shifts as a nurse at Carroll Hospital Center and holding down a part-time job in a clinic. Toss in friends and studies toward an advanced degree and her plate was full - full of everything but healthful food. Eating had become something to do in her car or in one big sitting late at night. Weary of a family history of health maladies, the 27-year-old contacted a registered dietitian about a year ago for help getting in shape. And she stuck with it, for a while anyway.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | April 28, 2007
In the late '90s, during the boom of teen pop, Christina Aguilera was usually singled out by critics as the one with the potential to transcend the genre. Unlike her other picture-perfect bubblegum peers (namely Jessica Simpson, Mandy Moore and especially Britney Spears), she possessed "real talent": a powerful, if slightly affected, singing style that evoked, at times, vintage Whitney Houston. In the eight years since the release of Aguilera's monstrous, self-titled debut, which sold 12 million copies and spawned the ubiquitous smashes "Genie in a Bottle" and "What a Girl Wants," the artist has become something of a pop chameleon.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | January 23, 2008
Genie Johns was working 12-hour shifts as a nurse at Carroll Hospital Center and holding down a part-time job in a clinic. Toss in friends and studies toward an advanced degree and her plate was full - full of everything but healthful food. Eating had become something to do in her car or in one big sitting late at night. Weary of a family history of health maladies, the 27-year-old contacted a registered dietitian about a year ago for help getting in shape. And she stuck with it, for a while anyway.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1990
Any computer user with a modem can send free electronic mail to military personnel in the Persian Gulf through GEnie, a nationwide on-line information service owned by General Electric.The electronic mail is forwarded to Saudi Arabia, where it's printed, placed in addressed envelopes and delivered by the military postal service."The word we're getting is that letters are getting delivered in as little as two days,'' said Chip Chiappone, GEnie's product marketing manager. "People seem thrilled that they don't have to put up with normal mail delays.
TRAVEL
By Jim Buchta and Jim Buchta,Minneapolis Star Tribune | January 7, 2007
MINNEAPOLIS -- A car at the airport, a private concierge and a sleek new Manhattan penthouse awaited Scott Jagodzinski and his family when their plane landed in New York for Thanksgiving weekend. Same thing when they go to Cabo San Lucas next spring, where they'll bed down at a beachfront house in a gated community. "The kids just love it -- they open the fridge, and there are their favorite things," said Jagodzinski, who belongs to the Eden Prairie, Minn.-based Lusso club, which charges members a one-time fee of $350,000 and annual payments of $25,000 for unlimited use of its multimillion-dollar getaway houses.
NEWS
By MARY HARRIS RUSSELL and MARY HARRIS RUSSELL,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 5, 2006
The Shadow Thieves Anne Ursu Ptolemy's Gate Jonathan Stroud Miramax/Hyperion / $17.95 / Ages 12-15 The final book in a series is often the most difficult to bring off. Jonathan Stroud is successful, largely because, from the beginning in The Bartimaeus Trilogy, he created a character, the genie Bartimaeus, whose witty overview and curmudgeonly interactions with the central characters are believable. Bartimaeus narrates some chapters, and we learn his history from the times of Ptolemy in much detail.
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