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Genghis Khan

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NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | February 22, 1993
The most striking aspect of Iraq's invasion of Kuwait was its extreme and gratuitous brutality -- gratuitous because so much of the torture, rape and murder of civilians was unnecessary to Kuwait's conquest. The same excessive violence has characterized the Serbian attack on Bosnians, Muslims and Croatians during the last year.Both of these military operations have more closely resembled sadistic orgies than the rational, disciplined use of force characteristic of modern military organizations.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | June 20, 2008
Genghis Khan: fierce warrior, ultimate survivor, loving husband. Yes, loving husband. That's the message of Sergei Bodrov's birth-of-a-nation epic Mongol, about the man who united all the Mongols and made them follow a handful of common laws instead of customs that they broke at will. It's a man's-man adventure: You can feel your chest hair grow a centimeter for each minute of screen time (and at 124 minutes, that's a lot of hair). But at the center of it all is this ferocious fighter's decision to choose his own bride as a child and stay faithful to her through thick and thin - although it's more like thin and thin for most of the movie.
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FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | August 15, 1994
How is it that a Chicago commodities broker, a self-taught expert on Genghis Khan, can claim to have a bead on the site of the 13th century conqueror's grave when even veteran scholars of Mongol history and the Mongolian people themselves don't?Academics were posing that question after the Mongolian government confirmed last week it has given its blessings to Maury Kravitz to search for the burial site.Media from around the world and people wanting to sign up for his expedition flooded Kravitz with phone calls last week.
NEWS
By Will Englund | October 7, 2006
What with Mark Foley and all, you may have missed some of the news that came perilously close to falling through the cracks this week. As a public service, here's a glance backward: Mongolia's legislature on Thursday began debating a law on regulating the use of Genghis Khan's name in a bid to prevent the memory of the legendary conqueror from being cheapened, an Associated Press writer named Ganbat Namjil reported. Since Mongolia emerged from the shadow of the Soviet Union in 1991, the isolated Asian nation has applied the moniker of its favorite son to more than half a dozen brands of vodka and beer and a variety of other commercial products.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 2001
The Mongolian barbecue was originated during Genghis Khan's advance westward during the Yuan Dynasty. After a victory on the battlefield, Genghis Khan's soldiers indulged themselves by eating large quantities of mutton and beef. They broiled the meat on large shields, eating it in large pieces while drinking butter from large bowls. This method of feasting gradually developed into the popular Mongolian barbecue. If you enjoy Mongolian barbecue, you don't have to go to Washington or Bethesda any longer: Columbia's Mongolian Grill opened just more than a year ago and offers everything you expect from a Mongolian barbecue.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | December 31, 1991
Genghis Khan isn't anybody's patron saint. But to Severna Park author David McCallum, the emperor of China ought to be.In his revisionist history, which McCallum has written with a Chinese researcher, he tells the "other" story of the man known as the scourge of the East, the feared Khan who in the 13th century conquered nearly the entireknown civilized world."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Kimmelman and By Michael Kimmelman,New York Times News Service | November 17, 2002
NEW YORK -- Midway through The Legacy of Genghis Khan at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, there are a few tent hangings, woven silk and gold. Mongol rulers, we are instructed by the wall text, reconciled their nomadic roots with the perks of sedentary life by lugging giant tents on wheeled contraptions pulled by oxen. These portable palaces were lined with fancy textiles, sewn together and draped, to make a kind of interior arcade. One tent was said to have been so elaborate it took three years to construct and furnish.
NEWS
By Will Englund | October 7, 2006
What with Mark Foley and all, you may have missed some of the news that came perilously close to falling through the cracks this week. As a public service, here's a glance backward: Mongolia's legislature on Thursday began debating a law on regulating the use of Genghis Khan's name in a bid to prevent the memory of the legendary conqueror from being cheapened, an Associated Press writer named Ganbat Namjil reported. Since Mongolia emerged from the shadow of the Soviet Union in 1991, the isolated Asian nation has applied the moniker of its favorite son to more than half a dozen brands of vodka and beer and a variety of other commercial products.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 9, 1996
KARAKORUM, Mongolia -- In a quiet valley at the end of a rutted road, a few stone and ceramic fragments have been piled on top of each other in memory of the past. The beheaded stone lions and smashed tiles are about all that remain above ground of ancient Karakorum, once the capital of the world's largest empire.Now, 790 years after Genghis Khan founded the Mongol Empire, his descendants are trying to establish themselves in the modern world, breaking out of centuries of isolation and foreign occupation to build an open, prosperous nation.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 17, 1994
According to "CBS This Morning," today's the day the network will relay coverage of the first practice session attended by both Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding. Each, no doubt, has thought long and hard about how, and if, to react to the other, and this non-event is sure to be broadcast as many times as any medal-winning performance. Can you say "media circus," boys and girls?* "The 1994 Winter Olympic Games" (8-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The onslaught begins in earnest: In addition to the events covered by CBS tonight, the network has scheduled a prime-time "women's figure skating preview."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Kimmelman and By Michael Kimmelman,New York Times News Service | November 17, 2002
NEW YORK -- Midway through The Legacy of Genghis Khan at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, there are a few tent hangings, woven silk and gold. Mongol rulers, we are instructed by the wall text, reconciled their nomadic roots with the perks of sedentary life by lugging giant tents on wheeled contraptions pulled by oxen. These portable palaces were lined with fancy textiles, sewn together and draped, to make a kind of interior arcade. One tent was said to have been so elaborate it took three years to construct and furnish.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 2001
The Mongolian barbecue was originated during Genghis Khan's advance westward during the Yuan Dynasty. After a victory on the battlefield, Genghis Khan's soldiers indulged themselves by eating large quantities of mutton and beef. They broiled the meat on large shields, eating it in large pieces while drinking butter from large bowls. This method of feasting gradually developed into the popular Mongolian barbecue. If you enjoy Mongolian barbecue, you don't have to go to Washington or Bethesda any longer: Columbia's Mongolian Grill opened just more than a year ago and offers everything you expect from a Mongolian barbecue.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 9, 1996
KARAKORUM, Mongolia -- In a quiet valley at the end of a rutted road, a few stone and ceramic fragments have been piled on top of each other in memory of the past. The beheaded stone lions and smashed tiles are about all that remain above ground of ancient Karakorum, once the capital of the world's largest empire.Now, 790 years after Genghis Khan founded the Mongol Empire, his descendants are trying to establish themselves in the modern world, breaking out of centuries of isolation and foreign occupation to build an open, prosperous nation.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | August 15, 1994
How is it that a Chicago commodities broker, a self-taught expert on Genghis Khan, can claim to have a bead on the site of the 13th century conqueror's grave when even veteran scholars of Mongol history and the Mongolian people themselves don't?Academics were posing that question after the Mongolian government confirmed last week it has given its blessings to Maury Kravitz to search for the burial site.Media from around the world and people wanting to sign up for his expedition flooded Kravitz with phone calls last week.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 17, 1994
According to "CBS This Morning," today's the day the network will relay coverage of the first practice session attended by both Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding. Each, no doubt, has thought long and hard about how, and if, to react to the other, and this non-event is sure to be broadcast as many times as any medal-winning performance. Can you say "media circus," boys and girls?* "The 1994 Winter Olympic Games" (8-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The onslaught begins in earnest: In addition to the events covered by CBS tonight, the network has scheduled a prime-time "women's figure skating preview."
NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | February 22, 1993
The most striking aspect of Iraq's invasion of Kuwait was its extreme and gratuitous brutality -- gratuitous because so much of the torture, rape and murder of civilians was unnecessary to Kuwait's conquest. The same excessive violence has characterized the Serbian attack on Bosnians, Muslims and Croatians during the last year.Both of these military operations have more closely resembled sadistic orgies than the rational, disciplined use of force characteristic of modern military organizations.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | June 20, 2008
Genghis Khan: fierce warrior, ultimate survivor, loving husband. Yes, loving husband. That's the message of Sergei Bodrov's birth-of-a-nation epic Mongol, about the man who united all the Mongols and made them follow a handful of common laws instead of customs that they broke at will. It's a man's-man adventure: You can feel your chest hair grow a centimeter for each minute of screen time (and at 124 minutes, that's a lot of hair). But at the center of it all is this ferocious fighter's decision to choose his own bride as a child and stay faithful to her through thick and thin - although it's more like thin and thin for most of the movie.
BUSINESS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,New York Times News Service | March 26, 1992
NEW YORK -- And now, ladies and gentlemen and children of all ages, the newest -- and perhaps the most unusual -- economic strategy yet by a former Communist country: Mongolia has run away with the circus.When the 122nd edition of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus opens today in Madison Square Garden here, its centerpiece will be a horde of 42 dancers, musicians, animal riders and acrobats from Mongolia.TC Never an enterprise to underplay its stars, the circus has had advance posters in a dozen cities proclaiming, "The Mongolians Are Coming!"
BUSINESS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,New York Times News Service | March 26, 1992
NEW YORK -- And now, ladies and gentlemen and children of all ages, the newest -- and perhaps the most unusual -- economic strategy yet by a former Communist country: Mongolia has run away with the circus.When the 122nd edition of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus opens today in Madison Square Garden here, its centerpiece will be a horde of 42 dancers, musicians, animal riders and acrobats from Mongolia.TC Never an enterprise to underplay its stars, the circus has had advance posters in a dozen cities proclaiming, "The Mongolians Are Coming!"
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | December 31, 1991
Genghis Khan isn't anybody's patron saint. But to Severna Park author David McCallum, the emperor of China ought to be.In his revisionist history, which McCallum has written with a Chinese researcher, he tells the "other" story of the man known as the scourge of the East, the feared Khan who in the 13th century conquered nearly the entireknown civilized world."
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