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Geneva Convention

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NEWS
December 11, 2001
IT IS NOT too late for Washington to declare loud and clear that the Geneva Convention must be observed for all prisoners held by all parties in the war in Afghanistan. To refrain from doing so would be folly. The Taliban and al-Qaida probably have fought more determinedly since the murders of prisoners by the forces of Northern Alliance warlords in Mazar-e Sharif and Kunduz last month. Confidence of humane treatment would induce more surrenders and save lives on both sides. Afghanistan's recent traditions include mass murders of prisoners but also negotiations to avoid actual fighting.
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EXPLORE
September 22, 2011
Nerve gas, mustard agent and Sarin are all words most of us would like to never hear pronounced. Along with biological agents and nuclear weapons, they are among the most sinister tools of modern warfare. So feared are they that they are banned under the Geneva Convention's rules of war and have rarely been used. On those occasions when they have been inflicted on populations, mostly by the Iraqi regime of more than a decade ago, the results have been horrifying, even compared to more conventional forms of warfare.
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By LEONARD S. RUBENSTEIN AND NATHANIEL RAYMOND | May 14, 2000
DR. HASAN Baiyev opened a small war hospital in the village of Alkhan-Kala, his hometown in Chechnya, at the first clash between Chechen insurgents and the Russian army in 1994. The one-story cement block building contained few medical supplies and a staff of just eight nurses and a handful of volunteers. Baiyev was the sole physician. Refusing to side with either, he treated soldier and civilian, Chechen or Russian. "My plan was to stay despite the bombs and the shelling, to stay until the last minute," he said.
NEWS
June 7, 2010
Thank you for publishing the lucid, information-rich op-ed piece by Laila El-Haddad ("Israeli brutality on land and at sea," June 3). Ms. El-Haddad has pointed out the arbitrary nature of the restrictions that Israel imposes upon 1.6 million Gazans. No wheelchairs or paper or children's books. Also, no coriander or house plants. These, and many more banned items, are Israel's means of inflicting collective punishment, a violation of the Geneva Convention. A related topic is the significance of the natural gas reserves that have been discovered off the coast of Gaza and the business negotiations connected with this discovery.
EXPLORE
September 22, 2011
Nerve gas, mustard agent and Sarin are all words most of us would like to never hear pronounced. Along with biological agents and nuclear weapons, they are among the most sinister tools of modern warfare. So feared are they that they are banned under the Geneva Convention's rules of war and have rarely been used. On those occasions when they have been inflicted on populations, mostly by the Iraqi regime of more than a decade ago, the results have been horrifying, even compared to more conventional forms of warfare.
NEWS
June 7, 2010
Thank you for publishing the lucid, information-rich op-ed piece by Laila El-Haddad ("Israeli brutality on land and at sea," June 3). Ms. El-Haddad has pointed out the arbitrary nature of the restrictions that Israel imposes upon 1.6 million Gazans. No wheelchairs or paper or children's books. Also, no coriander or house plants. These, and many more banned items, are Israel's means of inflicting collective punishment, a violation of the Geneva Convention. A related topic is the significance of the natural gas reserves that have been discovered off the coast of Gaza and the business negotiations connected with this discovery.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 8, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Under pressure from U.S. allies, President Bush has extended the protections of the Geneva Convention to Taliban captives. But the United States will not apply such protections to al-Qaida terrorists. Ari Fleischer, the White House spokesman, said yesterday that Bush had also decided that neither Taliban nor al-Qaida fighters captured in Afghanistan would be deemed prisoners of war. Under the Geneva Convention, POWs and captives who face interrogation need not supply more than their name, rank and serial number.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and Noam N. Levey and James Gerstenzang and Noam N. Levey,Los Angeles Times | September 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush escalated a brawl with rebellious senators within his own party yesterday over his proposal to allow harsh interrogation of terrorism detainees, warning that the outcome of the debate "really is going to define whether or not we can protect ourselves." At a news conference in the White House Rose Garden, the president, in unusually forceful language, urged members of Congress to approve his plan for interrogating detainees and trying them before military commissions.
NEWS
July 12, 2006
NATIONAL Geneva Convention protections The Bush administration acknowledged yesterday that it was legally obligated to apply Geneva Convention protections to detainees being held at Guantanamo Bay and elsewhere, reversing a position it has held for more than four years. But, it declared that the shift would not significantly change the way it currently treats captives. pg 1a MARYLAND Steffen is ready to talk Joseph F. Steffen Jr., the former longtime aide to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. who disappeared as a special legislative committee examining the administration's firing practices was seeking him to testify, has returned to the Baltimore area and is ready to talk to lawmakers.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | January 22, 1991
LONDON -- In the wake of Iraq's threat to use captured allied fliers as human shields, Britain revealed yesterday that it was holding two Iraqi servicemen, initially detained as security risks, as prisoners of war.The parading of two Royal Air Force officers -- a Tornado fighter-bomber pilot and navigator -- on Iraqi television alongside three U.S. and two other allied fliers outraged the British government and was condemned as a breach of the Geneva Convention.The...
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and Noam N. Levey and James Gerstenzang and Noam N. Levey,Los Angeles Times | September 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush escalated a brawl with rebellious senators within his own party yesterday over his proposal to allow harsh interrogation of terrorism detainees, warning that the outcome of the debate "really is going to define whether or not we can protect ourselves." At a news conference in the White House Rose Garden, the president, in unusually forceful language, urged members of Congress to approve his plan for interrogating detainees and trying them before military commissions.
NEWS
July 12, 2006
NATIONAL Geneva Convention protections The Bush administration acknowledged yesterday that it was legally obligated to apply Geneva Convention protections to detainees being held at Guantanamo Bay and elsewhere, reversing a position it has held for more than four years. But, it declared that the shift would not significantly change the way it currently treats captives. pg 1a MARYLAND Steffen is ready to talk Joseph F. Steffen Jr., the former longtime aide to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. who disappeared as a special legislative committee examining the administration's firing practices was seeking him to testify, has returned to the Baltimore area and is ready to talk to lawmakers.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | November 24, 2005
Some people seem to see nothing between zero and infinity. Things are either categorically all right or they are categorically off-limits. This kind of reasoning - if it can be called reasoning - is reflected in the stampede to ban torture by congressional legislation. As far as a general policy is concerned, there is no torture to ban. Isolated individuals here and there may abuse their authority and violate existing laws and policies by their treatment of prisoners, but the point is that these are in fact violations.
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - The first military commission trial at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was halted Monday after a federal judge here ruled the proceedings invalid under U.S. and international law - dealing a blow to the legal process set up by the Bush administration to handle accused terrorists. The case against Salim Ahmed Hamdan was suspended after U.S. District Judge James Robertson ruled that the Yemeni man had been denied due process. The ruling affects all of the nearly 500 detainees from Afghanistan now at Guantanamo.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - Presented last fall with a detailed catalog of abuses at Abu Ghraib prison, the U.S. military responded Dec. 24 with a confidential letter to a Red Cross official asserting that many Iraqi prisoners were not entitled to the full protections of the Geneva Conventions. The letter, drafted by military lawyers and signed by Brig. Gen. Janis L. Karpinski, emphasized the "military necessity" of isolating some inmates at the prison for interrogation because of their "significant intelligence value," and said that prisoners held as security risks could legally be treated differently from prisoners of war or ordinary criminals.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 22, 2004
As the top lawyer in the White House, Alberto R. Gonzales has built the foundation for the Bush administration's most sensitive legal maneuvers, including the creation of military tribunals for terror suspects and the assertion of executive privilege to keep private an array of presidential documents. The low-key Gonzales, a longtime Bush loyalist who is often mentioned as a potential U.S. Supreme Court nominee, rarely breaks the public surface in his work. But he now faces high-profile questions about whether his legal advice in the aftermath of Sept.
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - The first military commission trial at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was halted Monday after a federal judge here ruled the proceedings invalid under U.S. and international law - dealing a blow to the legal process set up by the Bush administration to handle accused terrorists. The case against Salim Ahmed Hamdan was suspended after U.S. District Judge James Robertson ruled that the Yemeni man had been denied due process. The ruling affects all of the nearly 500 detainees from Afghanistan now at Guantanamo.
NEWS
December 21, 2001
In fighting terror, U.S. must respect Geneva Convention I applaud The Sun for encouraging the United States to follow international human rights conventions at a time when vengeance has seemingly taken precedence over justice ('Treating prisoners of war humanely."
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 8, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Under pressure from U.S. allies, President Bush has extended the protections of the Geneva Convention to Taliban captives. But the United States will not apply such protections to al-Qaida terrorists. Ari Fleischer, the White House spokesman, said yesterday that Bush had also decided that neither Taliban nor al-Qaida fighters captured in Afghanistan would be deemed prisoners of war. Under the Geneva Convention, POWs and captives who face interrogation need not supply more than their name, rank and serial number.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 28, 2002
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba -- Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld flew into this contentious little corner of his domain yesterday to demonstrate his conviction that the United States is doing exactly the right thing with its 158 detainees from Afghanistan. "They are not prisoners of war," he said. And despite qualms in the State Department and intense criticism from abroad, "they will not be determined to be prisoners of war." The detainees are being treated as if they are protected by the Geneva Convention -- which they are not, Rumsfeld said.
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