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HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
If one sign of a happy relationship is that the partners rarely run out of things to talk about, then cancer researchers Stephen Baylin and Feyruz Rassool of Baltimore have been a blessed couple indeed. In the 13 years they've been married, they've shared their passions for everything from hiking to Muddy Waters to Asian art. They regularly swap tales of their latest triumphs in the lab or struggles with a grant proposal. "We're better than the sum of our parts," Baylin said.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
William Smith's disease has grim milestones. At 2, the Gambrills triplet known as Mick couldn't walk or talk as well as his siblings. In kindergarten, he started losing language and motor skills. At 12, he needed a wheelchair and a feeding tube. Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital dedicated to treating his symptoms said he had an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. But a new test may provide something the family has long sought: a name. "The idea that there is something out there that can tell you [what's wrong]
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1998
When Greater Baltimore Medical Center officials heard Baltimore County wanted to tell senior citizens about the links between health and family histories, they jumped at the chance to help -- and to publicize GBMC's new genetics research center.Now, in the latest in a series of public-private partnerships, the County Council is being asked to approve GBMC's contribution of $30,000 to print 250,000 informational file folders for the county Department of Aging.The county's Genetic Information Family Tree Program will distribute the folders around Thanksgiving to seniors and their families, allowing those interested to track their family and medical histories.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Toni L. Killefer, a former preschool teacher who mentored cancer patients and participated in breast cancer research, died Monday of metastatic breast cancer at her Stevenson home. She was 49. "I took care of Toni for a number of years, and she had her eyes wide open on this. She always knew what she was up against and she was very straightforward," said Dr. John H. Fetting III, a Johns Hopkins Hospital oncologist. "All she wanted to be was a mom and look out for her children with as little fuss about her illness, and just be able to manage.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1995
QUEENSTOWN -- State troopers set up a roadblock outside the conference on crime and genetics yesterday, but they weren't needed. The weekend meeting, preceded by years of rancor and two hours of protests Saturday, ended amid unaccustomed calm.In the end, about 100 scientists and other scholars even seemed to agree on one thing: There's no direct evidence that specific genetic mutations can make someone more likely to commit a violent crime, and such mutations may never be found.But supporters hope such genes exist, and that one day murder and mayhem can be prevented with medical therapy.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1995
QUEENSTOWN -- Scientific meetings rarely get people's blood boiling, but this weekend's Aspen Institute conference is no ordinary colloquium: It puts a Bunsen burner under the simmering issue of the genetics of crime.For three years, David Wasserman, a College Park legal scholar, has been trying to stage his conference, titled "Research in Genetics and Criminal Behavior: Scientific Issues, Social and Political Implications," despite denunciations, anger and anguish. The conference runs through tomorrow.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1995
An article in yesterday's editions about the genetics and crime conference in Queenstown inaccurately described a study cited by Dr. Irving Gottesman of the University of Virginia. The study, conducted by researchers in Minnesota, showed that identical twins reared apart tended to have similar scores in tests for anti-social personality disorder.The Sun regrets the error.QUEENSTOWN -- For a while yesterday, it looked as though a raucous group of protesters might give scientists at a conference on genes and crime a first-hand look at the aggression they typically study in labs and classrooms.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1999
Vascular Genetics Inc., a Boston-based venture which is partially owned by Human Genome Sciences of Rockville, said yesterday that it has raised an undisclosed amount of money to fund its next human trials of a pioneering gene therapy for cardiovascular disease."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2011
Bernice H. Cohen, a retired Johns Hopkins University scientist who was an early advocate of showing how genetics and epidemiology could be connected, died of congestive heart failure April 12 at the North Oaks Retirement Community. She was 86. "She was unique in having the foresight to bring together the scientific fields of genetics and epidemiology, and established the first formal academic training program in genetic epidemiology at Johns Hopkins in 1979," said a Hopkins colleague, Terri H. Beaty of Cockeysville.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN REPORTER | December 31, 2006
Lois Vaught has a sweet smile, a soft voice and an aversion to hearing aids. Although she's deaf, she will not use one. When you're 104, you can decide these things for yourself. "My husband had a hearing aid, but it wasn't satisfactory. It never worked right," says the oldest resident of the Friends Nursing Home in Sandy Spring. Hearing aside, Lois Vaught is alert, reads a newspaper every day and responds to questions put to her in writing. She also has the kind of background that increases her odds of living into the triple digits.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
A Reisterstown woman who at 20 retained the appearance of a toddler as the result of a rare genetic disorder has died. Brooke Greenberg died Oct. 24, her father, Howard Greenberg, said. "She was a very special child," he said. "She gave nothing but love. " Because of her condition, Greenberg, who has been profiled by several national media outlets, suffered from multiple medical issues. Bronchomalacia, a condition that makes breathing difficult, led to her death. The woman had been studied by doctors seeking to understand the aging process.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
If one sign of a happy relationship is that the partners rarely run out of things to talk about, then cancer researchers Stephen Baylin and Feyruz Rassool of Baltimore have been a blessed couple indeed. In the 13 years they've been married, they've shared their passions for everything from hiking to Muddy Waters to Asian art. They regularly swap tales of their latest triumphs in the lab or struggles with a grant proposal. "We're better than the sum of our parts," Baylin said.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 1, 2013
Roots Market, an organic grocer in Clarksville and Olney, plans to highlight non- genetically modified ingredients this month. "Genetically modified organisms" or GMOs, are plants or animals created through gene splicing techniques of biotechnology, or genetic engineering, according to the Non-GMO Project, a nonprofit working to build sources of non-GMO products. The group, which designated October as non-GMO Month, says the experimental technology, which merges DNA from different species, creates unstable combinations of plant, animal, bacterial and viral genes.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Henrietta Lacks had no control when doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital used her cells 62 years ago in research that led to groundbreaking medical advances. But now her descendants will. The National Institutes of Health said Wednesday that it had reached an agreement with Lacks' family that requires scientists to get permission from the government agency to use her genome, or genetic blueprint. It was derived from cells taken from the 31-year-old from Turners Station after she died from an aggressive form of cervical cancer in 1951.
HEALTH
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Researchers hailed the Supreme Court ruling Wednesday that bans the patenting of human DNA, saying it would expand access to genetic testing for disease at lower cost to patients. In a unanimous decision, the justices said Myriad Genetics did not have exclusive rights to the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genes that are linked to significantly greater risk for breast cancer and thus should not be the only company allowed to test for it. "Myriad did not create anything," Justice Clarence Thomas wrote for his fellow justices.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
The Supreme Court's decision today to uphold Maryland's law allowing the collection of DNA samples from people arrested for serious crimes upholds the interests of justice, the Constitution and common sense. Concerns that the DNA samples could violate suspects' privacy were unfounded, the practice of taking the samples is less intrusive than other searches authorized under the Fourth Amendment, and the direct result of a ruling against the law would have been the possibility that a known rapist would be released onto the street.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
Most of us know a white person, a black person, an Asian or American Indian when we see one. We say we can spot them by their skin color, their hair texture, or by the shape of their eyes, or nose, or lips. And many people, consciously or unconsciously, will leap from the perception of race to assumptions about a stranger's genetics, biology, behavior and abilities. They'd probably be wrong. Advances in genetics are undermining some of our oldest notions about the nature and biology of race.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Actress Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy rather than risk developing breast cancer hit close to home for Melissa DeSantis, a Bel Air mother of three children. As DeSantis read about Jolie's experience, she began to feel a sense of kinship to the Hollywood star. DeSantis also made the tough decision to have her breasts removed in a February surgery. Like Jolie, she had one of the inherited gene mutations that leaves many women more likely to develop cancer.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Margaret Hawkins Abbott, a retired Johns Hopkins Medical School genetics researcher who investigated families with inherited conditions for nearly five decades, died of dementia complications Feb. 1 at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 89 and lived in Ruxton. "She was a Johns Hopkins institution," said Dr. Jason Brandt, Johns Hopkins Medical School director of medical psychology and professor of psychiatry. "She dedicated her career to nursing and genetic diseases and to ferreting out family medical histories.
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