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By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
As a boy in Chicago, Robert J. Griesbach eyed the flowers his geneticist father was cross-breeding and asked himself, why ARE roses red and violets blue?As a plant geneticist, Griesbach has spent 15 years at the Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville trying to answer that question.Now, the Ellicott City man thinks he has the answer, one that vaults genetic research over a decades-old barrier and that could open up a new world of striking, first-of-their-kind flower colors -- blue roses, red Easter lilies, pumpkin-colored petunias.
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NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | June 24, 2009
The Obama administration is reportedly considering backing a radical plan to shrink deteriorating American cities by bulldozing entire neighborhoods and returning the land to nature. The idea, which originated in Flint, Mich. - cratered by the auto industry implosion - is to persuade disintegrating and depopulated cities to embrace their shrinkage, destroy abandoned infrastructure, save money and thereby stave off fiscal ruin. The plan makes sense on some level, but it's disturbing on another.
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NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2003
FREDERICK -- As the deadly SARS epidemic swept across Asia last spring, geneticist Stephen J. O'Brien couldn't stop thinking about a 20-year-old vial of frozen cheetah tissue sitting in a backroom of his laboratory. The pinkie-sized plastic container, chilling in a tank of liquid nitrogen at minus 320 degrees Fahrenheit, holds tissue sliced from wild cats killed during a 1983 coronavirus epidemic. When investigators announced that the same type of virus was suspected of causing SARS, O'Brien wondered: Were the two viruses the same?
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | May 29, 2008
WASHINGTON - The government's leading geneticist announced yesterday that he is stepping down after 15 years, paving the way for the growing role that DNA will play in medical care. As director of the National Human Genome Research Institute, Dr. Francis S. Collins led the successful effort to sequence the human genome and helped secure a new law, signed just last week, barring discrimination based on genetic information. He also shepherded significant advances in understanding the genetic causes of common diseases, while attempting to reassure a public concerned about the ethical implications of the fast-moving developments.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 25, 1993
C What if a mad geneticist revived an extinct animal that went amok and took over the world and was called homo sapiens?
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | November 28, 1997
By borrowing glowing chemicals from fireflies and jellyfish, scientists have found that biological clocks -- apparently set by the sun -- exist all over the body of fruit flies.If the findings, published in the journal Science, hold true for people and animals, researchers will have to change theirthinking about how daily rhythms are set and how to design light treatments for conditions such as jet lag and depression.Until now, most scientists assumed that the biological clock that drives the daily rhythm of most animals -- including people -- was located in the brain and triggered through the eyes.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2002
When J. Craig Venter was ousted from the Rockville company he created to decode the human genome, scientists doubted it would be the last anybody would hear from the maverick geneticist. Yesterday, they were proved right. Three months after he left the spotlight, the 55-year-old scientist leapt back in, announcing he would use the more than $100 million he earned at Celera Genomics and previous ventures to educate the public on the possibilities - and potential dangers - of genetic advances.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder News Service | May 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- At last, science has solved one of the grea dilemmas of the single person: how do you keep a head of lettuce fresh until you finish it?The answer: miniature heads of lettuce.Thanks to scientists in California, shoppers will soon be able to buy tiny heads of iceberg lettuce -- so small they're only the size of a tennis ball. They're designed to be eaten at one sitting, perfectly sized for a single salad.The Father of Midget Lettuce is a U.S. Department of Agriculture scientist, William Waycott, who with geneticist Edward Ryder bred the surprise creation during biological research in the mid-1980s.
NEWS
By Gina Kolata and Gina Kolata,New York Times News Service | February 6, 1992
In a finding that adds a strange new twist to traditional genetics, scientists have discovered that the most common form of muscular dystrophy is caused by a gene that gradually grows bigger each time it is inherited. And the bigger it gets, the worse the disease.The discovery about myotonic dystrophy, made at the same time by three separate groups of scientists, brings to light a novel mechanism of inheritance, involving a sliding scale of genetic damage that gets more severe with subsequent generations.
FEATURES
By Melissa Healy | January 3, 2008
Forgiveness of others long predates organized religion as a desirable practice. Michael McCullough, a psychologist at the University of Miami and author of a forthcoming book on the subject, surmises that higher primates and early humans who were more forgiving were more likely to maintain the family and social relations that would help them fend off predators, secure food and go on to reproduce, thereby passing a tendency to forgive on to future generations....
FEATURES
By Melissa Healy | January 3, 2008
Forgiveness of others long predates organized religion as a desirable practice. Michael McCullough, a psychologist at the University of Miami and author of a forthcoming book on the subject, surmises that higher primates and early humans who were more forgiving were more likely to maintain the family and social relations that would help them fend off predators, secure food and go on to reproduce, thereby passing a tendency to forgive on to future generations....
NEWS
By Michael Amon and Michael Amon,NEWSDAY | October 19, 2007
NEW YORK -- James Watson, the Nobel-winning geneticist, apologized yesterday for his comments on the intelligence of black people as outrage poured in from across the globe and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory officials gathered to decide its future with the embattled scientist. "I cannot understand how I could have said what I am quoted as having said," Watson, 79, said in a statement given to the Associated Press. "To all those who have drawn the inference from my words that Africa, as a continent, is somehow genetically inferior, I can only apologize unreservedly.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 18, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- As we branched off from each other on the evolutionary tree, our ancestors look to have made a messy break from those of chimpanzees. By comparing samples of chimp, gorilla and human DNA, scientists from MIT and Harvard say they see possible evidence of interspecies sex. But there's a problem with this finding, say paleontologists who study human origins. The geneticists are proposing that our ancestors were still mixing it up with those of the chimps until 6 million years ago -- a time when one lineage was on all fours, the other walking upright.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2003
FREDERICK -- As the deadly SARS epidemic swept across Asia last spring, geneticist Stephen J. O'Brien couldn't stop thinking about a 20-year-old vial of frozen cheetah tissue sitting in a backroom of his laboratory. The pinkie-sized plastic container, chilling in a tank of liquid nitrogen at minus 320 degrees Fahrenheit, holds tissue sliced from wild cats killed during a 1983 coronavirus epidemic. When investigators announced that the same type of virus was suspected of causing SARS, O'Brien wondered: Were the two viruses the same?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | April 27, 2003
DNA: The Secret of Life, by James D. Watson. Alfred A. Knopf, 446 pages. $39.95. Fifty years ago, deoxyribonucleic acid was just one of the human body's many obscure chemicals, a substance of interest to only a tiny handful of scientists around the world. And even they weren't sure what to make of it. Today, of course, that's all changed. DNA is a cultural and scientific superstar, its curvy profile plastered on everything from billboards to business cards. The molecule is used to solve crimes, head off disease, design hardier crops and probe the origins of our species.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2002
When J. Craig Venter was ousted from the Rockville company he created to decode the human genome, scientists doubted it would be the last anybody would hear from the maverick geneticist. Yesterday, they were proved right. Three months after he left the spotlight, the 55-year-old scientist leapt back in, announcing he would use the more than $100 million he earned at Celera Genomics and previous ventures to educate the public on the possibilities - and potential dangers - of genetic advances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | April 27, 2003
DNA: The Secret of Life, by James D. Watson. Alfred A. Knopf, 446 pages. $39.95. Fifty years ago, deoxyribonucleic acid was just one of the human body's many obscure chemicals, a substance of interest to only a tiny handful of scientists around the world. And even they weren't sure what to make of it. Today, of course, that's all changed. DNA is a cultural and scientific superstar, its curvy profile plastered on everything from billboards to business cards. The molecule is used to solve crimes, head off disease, design hardier crops and probe the origins of our species.
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | June 24, 2009
The Obama administration is reportedly considering backing a radical plan to shrink deteriorating American cities by bulldozing entire neighborhoods and returning the land to nature. The idea, which originated in Flint, Mich. - cratered by the auto industry implosion - is to persuade disintegrating and depopulated cities to embrace their shrinkage, destroy abandoned infrastructure, save money and thereby stave off fiscal ruin. The plan makes sense on some level, but it's disturbing on another.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2002
In a practice that some fear may slow the pace of life-saving discovery, academic geneticists frequently refuse to share their research data and materials with other scientists, a new Harvard-led study finds. The research, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, is the first to take an in-depth look at the practice of so-called data withholding. Competition is nothing new, and may contribute to discovery. "That's what makes people sit in their labs for 80 hours a week," says Eric G. Campbell, a health policy researcher at the Harvard Medical School and lead author of the study.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1999
A growing scientific consensus is rejecting the racial categories that still dominate American life as biologically almost meaningless, a vestige of 18th-century pseudoscience that has only confused humans' struggle to understand themselves.The impact of the scientific critique of race is only now beginning to be felt outside scholarly meetings and genetics labs.It fueled a heated debate over the racial terms in the 2000 U.S. Census and prompted a plea from the American Anthropological Association to drop race altogether from the 2010 Census.
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