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Genetically Engineered

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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 14, 2000
Joe Williams, a Virginia tobacco farmer, has been forced to cut his production nearly in half over the past three years as people have kicked the smoking habit. But he is hoping that a small experimental plot he just planted will hold the key to his staying on the farm. That tobacco has been genetically engineered to produce not cigarettes but pharmaceuticals. Plants containing drugs could represent a new high-priced crop. "If we can actually find a medical use for tobacco that saves lives, what a turnaround for the much-maligned tobacco plant," said Christopher Cook, chief executive of ToBio, a company recently formed by Virginia tobacco farmers like Williams to grow drugs in cooperation with the CropTech Corp.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 1, 2013
Roots Market, an organic grocer in Clarksville and Olney, plans to highlight non- genetically modified ingredients this month. "Genetically modified organisms" or GMOs, are plants or animals created through gene splicing techniques of biotechnology, or genetic engineering, according to the Non-GMO Project, a nonprofit working to build sources of non-GMO products. The group, which designated October as non-GMO Month, says the experimental technology, which merges DNA from different species, creates unstable combinations of plant, animal, bacterial and viral genes.
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NEWS
By Assocaited Press | December 27, 1990
Genetically engineered clotting proteins work as well as the natural kind and can eliminate hemophiliacs' fears of AIDS and other blood-borne infections, researchers report.A two-year study of 107 men with hemophilia found no detectable difference between the clotting factor produced by genetically engineered bacteria and that extracted from blood plasma, an international research group reported yesterday in the New England Journal of Medicine.Hemophiliacs need injections of clotting proteins -- formally called factor VIII -- because a genetic defect prevents them from making their own. Most now lead near-normal lives by injecting factor VIII to stop episodes of excessive, continued bleeding.
NEWS
October 6, 2010
Here is an intriguing recipe: Take an ordinary Atlantic salmon, add hormones from a Chinook salmon and an eel-like fish called an ocean pout, and voila ! You have a super-sized salmon, one that grows twice as fast as normal. This recipe has the producers of the fish, the Massachusetts firm AquaBounty Technologies, salivating, promising as it does a plump product in record time. It also has its critics, who have questioned whether it is safe for all consumers and who have raised concerns about its effect on the environment.
NEWS
By Los Angles Times | March 19, 1992
Colorado researchers have used genetic engineering to produce a form of artificial blood, representing a significant step in the search for a solution to the worldwide shortage of blood.Researchers from Somatogen in Boulder report today in the British journal Nature that they have begun human trials with the blood, which is produced in bacteria.The artificial blood is a genetically engineered form of hemoglobin, the complicated protein that -- enclosed in red blood cells -- carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues throughout the body.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | April 1, 1993
The federal government published new rules yesterday that could speed up the biotech industry's development of genetically engineered plants, though the rules were more stringent than those first proposed by the Bush administration.In unusual accord, representatives of both the industry and the environmental community applauded the changes made by the Clinton administration, saying they were necessary. Environmentalists went further, however, saying that subtle changes in the regulations and the way in which they were reviewed signaled the new administration was far more sensitive to environmental interests.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Lehman and Jennifer Lehman,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
In the tanks that line the walls of Exotic Aquatics in Parkville's North Plaza Mall, there are plenty of aggressive, even scary fish swimming about: betta fish, or Siamese fighting fish, piranhas and stingrays. But the scariest of the bunch, according to some people, is a little inch-long, red-striped fish that has shown up in pet stores and aquarium shops across the country in the past month: a tiny, genetically altered tropical fish being marketed as the GloFish. Developed in Singapore for use in environmental research, the GloFish is the first genetically engineered pet to exude vibrant color under a black light.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In a long-awaited policy statement, the federal government plans to announce that foods developed through biotechnology are not inherently dangerous and, except rare cases, should not require extraordinary testing and regulation before going on the market.Some critics of genetically engineered foods have argued that they pose new safety risks and any foods that contain new substances should go through the extensive testing required of new food additives.In addition, they say, any such food sold to the public should be labeled so that consumers can identify it.The new policy, by contrast, holds that genetically engineered foods should be regulated just like ordinary ones unless they contain ingredients not usual for the product.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | June 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Federal food regulators announced yesterday a step toward guarding against genetic engineering experiments that could contaminate corn, grain or other crops. The Food and Drug Administration advised companies testing bioengineered plants to report their work first and vouch for its safety. The agency said it wants to make sure commercial crops aren't threatened by cross-pollination or commingling of seeds during the testing of experimental plants. The announcement comes amid heightened expectations that advances in genetics will lead over the next decade to more research and development of bioengineered crops.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | December 19, 1992
Crop Genetics Inc. said yesterday that it has found a British agricultural chemical company to help take its biological pesticide to market.ICI Agrochemicals, a division of Imperial Chemical Industries, has agreed to do large-scale field testing of a vaccine against the European corn borer, a product that has been under development by Crop Genetics for more than five years.The agreement with ICI replaced an earlier pact with DeKalb Genetics Corp. of DeKalb, Ill. That company backed away from its alliance with Hanover-based Crop Genetics yesterday, saying it preferred to develop its own genetically engineered plant that would be resistant to the corn borer.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | June 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Federal food regulators announced yesterday a step toward guarding against genetic engineering experiments that could contaminate corn, grain or other crops. The Food and Drug Administration advised companies testing bioengineered plants to report their work first and vouch for its safety. The agency said it wants to make sure commercial crops aren't threatened by cross-pollination or commingling of seeds during the testing of experimental plants. The announcement comes amid heightened expectations that advances in genetics will lead over the next decade to more research and development of bioengineered crops.
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2004
Dr. Jim Wilson never intended to create supermonkeys. A pioneer in genetic engineering, he was experimenting with a way to insert single genes into muscle cells, a technique that could someday be used to treat a variety of genetic illnesses. He chose a gene that boosts levels of erythropoietin, or EPO, a key hormone in the production of oxygen-toting red blood cells and a convenient marker to measure the success of his experiment. But EPO has long had another claim to fame. Its synthetic version, created in the 1980s to treat anemia, is one of the most notorious performance-enhancing drugs in competitive sports, able to increase endurance by raising the oxygen supply to muscles.
NEWS
By Jamie Talan and Jamie Talan,NEWSDAY | August 24, 2004
Increasing the activity of a single gene turns a mere rodent into Mighty Mouse, according to a new study. California scientists have genetically engineered an animal that has more muscle, less fat and more physical endurance than its littermates - it runs twice as far as expected. "We were quite surprised," said Ronald M. Evans, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, Calif. "Most people think that increased endurance comes from training. But we've been able to re-create this entire exercise network by increasing the activity of a single protein."
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
For more than half a century, researchers have tried to create a vaccine against Group A streptococcus, the nasty infectious bacteria that cause strep throat and rheumatic fever - and kill up to half a million people a year in the developing world. They might finally be on the right track. In a study published in today's issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association, scientists report that a new strep vaccine showed strong signs of working in humans and is also safe. "This is an important first step," said the study's lead author, University of Maryland vaccine researcher Karen Kotloff.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2004
The federal government and industry should step up efforts to spot potential hazards in all genetically modified foods before they reach the marketplace, a National Research Council panel concluded yesterday. In a report likely to re-ignite a long-smoldering debate between agricultural interests and critics of genetically engineered foods, scientists said there's a potential for danger whenever the genetic makeup of a food is deliberately changed. "All evidence to date indicates that any breeding technique that alters a plant or animal - whether by genetic engineering or other methods - has the potential to create unintended changes in the quality or amounts of food components that could harm health," said Bettie Sue Masters, the University of Texas chemist who headed the group.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Lehman and Jennifer Lehman,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
In the tanks that line the walls of Exotic Aquatics in Parkville's North Plaza Mall, there are plenty of aggressive, even scary fish swimming about: betta fish, or Siamese fighting fish, piranhas and stingrays. But the scariest of the bunch, according to some people, is a little inch-long, red-striped fish that has shown up in pet stores and aquarium shops across the country in the past month: a tiny, genetically altered tropical fish being marketed as the GloFish. Developed in Singapore for use in environmental research, the GloFish is the first genetically engineered pet to exude vibrant color under a black light.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In a long-awaited policy statement, the federal government plans to announce that foods developed through biotechnology are not inherently dangerous and, except in rare cases, should not require extraordinary testing and regulation before going on the market.Some critics of genetically engineered foods have argued that they pose new safety risks and that any containing new substances should go through the extensive testing required of new food additives. In addition, they say, any such food sold to the public should be labeled so that consumers can identify it.Government officials have a different view.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie | January 12, 1993
Columbia firm licenses genetic technologyWhat do male baldness, acne and mustaches on women have in common? An enzyme called 5 alpha-reducase -- at least that's what Medicis Pharmaceutical Corp. is betting on. The young New York pharmaceutical company has just licensed an antisense technology related to the enzyme from Genetic Medisyn Corp., a privately held company in Columbia.Medicis said last week that it also has obtained an option to purchase 75 percent of Genetic Medisyn from its parent company, Synthecell Corp.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2002
It's a brave new world in the barnyard. Cloned cows are becoming commonplace just five years after scientists created the first one, a Holstein steer named Gene. A handsome black-and-white Holstein heifer, created from a few cells scraped out of a champion's ear, sold for a mere $31,000 in Westminster yesterday. A Midwestern milk cow syndicate bought her, paying more than 10 times the going price for a fairly good milk cow. But the unromantically named Ada 3-ETN went for far less than the first commercially available Holstein clones, which sold at national auctions a little more than a year ago. Spotlights, smoke machines and other hoopla surrounded those clones, which sold before they were born for $80,000 to $100,000.
TOPIC
By Henry Silverman | February 18, 2001
A COUPLE IS asked by a futuristic fertility physician to decide which traits they wish for their unborn child. From a menu not unlike one sees in a restaurant, one can choose eye color, height, sex, musical talents, athletic abilities and intelligence, to name just a few. The chosen genes are inserted into the woman's egg, which is then fertilized and implanted in the woman's uterus to achieve pregnancy. Too futuristic and far-fetched? Maybe. But then again, maybe not. Recently, scientists presented their first interpretations of the human genome, part of an ongoing process that is expected in time to revolutionize medicine by treating disease at its genetic roots.
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