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Genetic Variation

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NEWS
August 28, 1997
THE DISCOVERY by Johns Hopkins researchers of a genetic mutation that doubles the risk of colorectal cancer illustrates the serendipity of science. At its best, scientific research meets exacting standards while remaining open to unanticipated discoveries, and to the seemingly unimportant clues that when examined more closely lead to dramatic breakthroughs.When Dr. Bert Vogelstein agreed to test a cancer patient who visited his Hopkins lab for genetic mutation that causes colon cancer, he never expected the favor to lead to a landmark discovery.
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NEWS
By Ariane Szu-Tu and Ariane Szu-Tu,Sun reporter | June 18, 2008
Rosann Fama, a contestant on the reality TV show Hell's Kitchen, correctly identified the taste of a nectarine while blindfolded. What's impressive about that, you may ask? A peach and a nectarine are essentially the same fruit. The difference is the result of a slight genetic variation - one gene - that leaves the nectarine without fuzz. In fact, a peach tree can begin growing nectarines instead of peaches if that genetic variation occurs within the peach tree, according to the Web site bouquetoffruits .com, which sells fruit gifts.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2008
Smoking causes lung cancer. That much is known. But three new studies published today suggest that genes might play a role in why some longtime smokers get the deadly disease and others do not. The scientists say these common genetic variations might also make smokers more likely to become addicted to tobacco and to smoke more cigarettes. The findings, which several experts said mark the first time that a genetic variation has been linked to lung cancer, could lead to a greater understanding of how smoking and genes interact to cause the disease.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2008
Smoking causes lung cancer. That much is known. But three new studies published today suggest that genes might play a role in why some longtime smokers get the deadly disease and others do not. The scientists say these common genetic variations might also make smokers more likely to become addicted to tobacco and to smoke more cigarettes. The findings, which several experts said mark the first time that a genetic variation has been linked to lung cancer, could lead to a greater understanding of how smoking and genes interact to cause the disease.
NEWS
By Ariane Szu-Tu and Ariane Szu-Tu,Sun reporter | June 18, 2008
Rosann Fama, a contestant on the reality TV show Hell's Kitchen, correctly identified the taste of a nectarine while blindfolded. What's impressive about that, you may ask? A peach and a nectarine are essentially the same fruit. The difference is the result of a slight genetic variation - one gene - that leaves the nectarine without fuzz. In fact, a peach tree can begin growing nectarines instead of peaches if that genetic variation occurs within the peach tree, according to the Web site bouquetoffruits .com, which sells fruit gifts.
NEWS
By Karen H. Rothenberg | May 9, 2007
Genetic research holds great promise to unlock new diagnoses and new treatments, and even to help create pharmaceutical therapies tailored to an individual's genetic makeup. But scientific research and development cannot progress without clinical trials, and these trials can move forward only if the individuals who could benefit are willing to participate. For that to happen, people must believe that their genetic information will not be used to deny them health care coverage or a job. A pair of groundbreaking studies reported last week show that researchers have discovered a genetic variation that increases the risk of heart disease by up to 60 percent.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 4, 1990
A preliminary study has found no genetic variation between a California owl and the northern spotted owl, whose dwindling numbers and steady loss of habitat have put it at the center of a dispute concerning logging in the Pacific Northwest.The results raise the question of whether the two birds are one subspecies of spotted owl rather than two, as scientists have thought.But researchers said they had analyzed only a small portion of the birds' genes so far. Further investigation and the use of more powerful analytical tools might turn up genetic differences, they said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service.. | April 27, 2007
Researchers said yesterday that they have identified seven new genes connected to the most common form of diabetes - the latest result of an intensifying race between university researchers and private companies to find genes linked to a range of diseases. The findings, presented in three reports by university scientists and one report by a private company, offer novel insights into the biology of a disease that affects 170 million people worldwide. And the sudden spate of new results marks an acceleration, and perhaps a turning point, in the ability to find disease genes, the long-promised payoff from the Human Genome Project that began in 1989.
NEWS
By Newsday | August 26, 1994
Like chambermaids cleaning up after departed guests, scientists have climbed trees and scoured branches in Africa seeking chimpanzee hair, hoping to figure out who's who among all the world's chimps.In the first large study of genetic variation among wild chimpanzees, researchers from the University of California, San Diego, used tiny bits of deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, from hair as a guide to chimpanzee relationships, mating preferences and social structure.The biggest surprise was that chimps from West Africa are genetically distinct from chimps in Central and East Africa, so much so that they may even be a separate species.
NEWS
December 22, 2003
SCIENCE HAS taken on entertainment, and entertainment wins. A Texas firm will soon be offering up pet zebra fish genetically enhanced to glow bright red in the dark. Demand is predicted to be high, even at the sticker-shock price of $5 a head. They should appeal to baby boomers who miss the joy of their Day-Glo posters and kids who have outgrown the glow-in-the-dark star stickers once plastered to their bedroom ceilings. Not to mention the hordes of aquarium lovers, always on the lookout for a unique addition to their aquatic landscapes.
NEWS
By Karen H. Rothenberg | May 9, 2007
Genetic research holds great promise to unlock new diagnoses and new treatments, and even to help create pharmaceutical therapies tailored to an individual's genetic makeup. But scientific research and development cannot progress without clinical trials, and these trials can move forward only if the individuals who could benefit are willing to participate. For that to happen, people must believe that their genetic information will not be used to deny them health care coverage or a job. A pair of groundbreaking studies reported last week show that researchers have discovered a genetic variation that increases the risk of heart disease by up to 60 percent.
NEWS
August 28, 1997
THE DISCOVERY by Johns Hopkins researchers of a genetic mutation that doubles the risk of colorectal cancer illustrates the serendipity of science. At its best, scientific research meets exacting standards while remaining open to unanticipated discoveries, and to the seemingly unimportant clues that when examined more closely lead to dramatic breakthroughs.When Dr. Bert Vogelstein agreed to test a cancer patient who visited his Hopkins lab for genetic mutation that causes colon cancer, he never expected the favor to lead to a landmark discovery.
NEWS
January 10, 1995
Is there any scientific basis for the familiar aphorism "like father, like son"? Apparently there's some truth to the observation that children resemble their parents in ways that involve more than just genes. Researchers in Israel recently have come up with an intriguing new twist on the ancient nature vs. nurture debate, one that may apply to a wide variety of situations, from nurturing musical talent in the very young to breaking the cycle of welfare dependency.Dr. Eva Jablonka of Tel Aviv University and Dr. Eytan Avital of the department of natural sciences at David Yelin Teacher's College in Jerusalem have proposed that many species, including humans, transmit characteristics from one generation to the next not simply by passing along their genes, but also by training their offspring to behave as they do so thoroughly that the behavior is passed down from generation to generation without any involvement of DNA, the complex genetic material in which inherited traits are encoded.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2005
The Food and Drug Administration yesterday approved BiDil, a drug specifically intended for use by African-Americans with congestive heart failure. The agency called the approval a step toward "the promise of personalized medicine." Studies showed that blacks benefited from the drug while the overall population did not. "The good news is they couldn't vote against [BiDil] because it's effective. ... The drug seems to work," said Lawrence C. Brody, a geneticist at the National Human Genome Research Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.
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