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Genetic Information

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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1997
The life insurance industry and privacy advocates clashed yesterday before a General Assembly committee over the uses and potential abuses of genetic information -- a topic one witness described as "the issue of the new millennium."The House Environmental Matters Committee heard calls from the sponsors of legislation to restrict the use of genetic information about individuals to "get out front" on an issue that is drawing increasing interest in state legislatures nationwide.But Roberta B. Meyer, senior counsel of the American Council of Life Insurance, testified that the legislation would interfere with the industry's essential function of determining risk.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
An Anne Arundel County man who was found guilty of a burglary based in part on DNA evidence asked a state appellate court Thursday to throw out his conviction, arguing that police improperly kept his genetic information in the database they used to link him to a Coke can from the crime scene. George Varriale, 46, gave a DNA sample to Anne Arundel County police in 2012 as they were investigating a reported rape. The sample did not link him to that crime, but police later used it to place him at the 2008 burglary of a Glen Burnie business.
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BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
Rockville-based InforMax Inc., competing in the fledgling but fast-paced world of bioinformatics, plans to issue public shares as it expands software offerings designed to help scientists at labs big and small turn mountains of information about genes and proteins into the bases for new drugs. The company, founded in 1990 by a Russian molecular geneticist invited to this country by DNA sleuth James D. Watson, already offers a product that allows laboratory scientists to analyze the chemical recipes of genes and proteins on desktop computers.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
The Supreme Court's decision today to uphold Maryland's law allowing the collection of DNA samples from people arrested for serious crimes upholds the interests of justice, the Constitution and common sense. Concerns that the DNA samples could violate suspects' privacy were unfounded, the practice of taking the samples is less intrusive than other searches authorized under the Fourth Amendment, and the direct result of a ruling against the law would have been the possibility that a known rapist would be released onto the street.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff | February 4, 2007
Karen Rothenberg says that almost as soon as scientists realized that they could map the human genome, there was also a realization that there were ethical and legal issues involved. "Pretty early in the process, Congress started setting aside money to look at the ethical and social implications of the Human Genome Project," she says of the government agencies involved in the research over a decade ago. Now dean of the University of Maryland's School of Law, Rothenberg has made something of a specialty of the intersection of medicine, science and the law. She is the founding director of the school's Law and Health Care program and took a leave in 1995 to work at the National Institutes of Health in the Office of Research on Women's Health.
TOPIC
By Ralph Brave | July 2, 2000
WHEN Francis Collins, director of the National Human Genome Research Institute, stood before the world's television cameras on Monday to announce the deciphering of the 3.1 billion units of DNA that make up the human genome, he declared, "This is a happy day for humankind." But last summer he shared a different view at a gathering of the nation's pre-eminent geneticists. "We are going to be going through hell, folks, because we will get to our diagnostic abilities ... but we won't have those therapeutic magic bullets that we hoped for," he said.
NEWS
By Karen H. Rothenberg | May 9, 2007
Genetic research holds great promise to unlock new diagnoses and new treatments, and even to help create pharmaceutical therapies tailored to an individual's genetic makeup. But scientific research and development cannot progress without clinical trials, and these trials can move forward only if the individuals who could benefit are willing to participate. For that to happen, people must believe that their genetic information will not be used to deny them health care coverage or a job. A pair of groundbreaking studies reported last week show that researchers have discovered a genetic variation that increases the risk of heart disease by up to 60 percent.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | April 25, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Coming to grips with the growing role of genetic testing in American life, Congress acted yesterday to outlaw the use of genetic information in employment or insurance decisions. The Senate approved a measure, which the House of Representatives is expected to ratify and President Bush to sign, that would become the first federal law dealing with the growing role of genetics in the prediction, diagnosis and individualized treatment of disease. Many patients who could benefit have refused genetic testing out of fear of discrimination, experts say, and potentially groundbreaking research into the molecular causes of disease has been stymied because possible study subjects, fearing repercussions, refuse to participate.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2000
PE Corp.-Celera Genomics Group, a fast-growing gene research company in Rockville, said yesterday that it had acquired a 47.5 percent stake in a genetic technology company in Shanghai, China. Celera acquired its stake in Shanghai GeneCore BioTechnologies from Axys Pharmaceuticals Inc. in San Francisco. Terms were not disclosed. PE Biosystems, another PE Corp. business, also owns a 47.5 percent stake in Shanghai GeneCore. "This acquisition will help Celera expand its business globally and provide access to many new sources of genetic information," said J. Craig Venter, Celera's president and chief scientific officer.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
The Legislative Black Caucus of Maryland is pushing legislation to close what it describes as loopholes in state law that allow police to keep DNA samples from people never convicted of crimes. Del. Jill P. Carter, a Baltimore Democrat, said Friday she is preparing — with caucus backing — to introduce a bill that would subject all DNA collected by Maryland police to the restrictive standards used for genetic information taken from people charged with violent crimes and burglaries.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
The Legislative Black Caucus of Maryland is pushing legislation to close what it describes as loopholes in state law that allow police to keep DNA samples from people never convicted of crimes. Del. Jill P. Carter, a Baltimore Democrat, said Friday she is preparing — with caucus backing — to introduce a bill that would subject all DNA collected by Maryland police to the restrictive standards used for genetic information taken from people charged with violent crimes and burglaries.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
Maryland's practice of collecting genetic information from people arrested — but not convicted — on serious charges took the national stage Tuesday, as the U.S. Supreme Court weighed in on what Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. called "perhaps the most important criminal procedure case" in decades. The four-year-old DNA collection law, overturned by Maryland's top court last year and appealed to the highest level of the federal justice system, drew questions from the justices about where to draw the line on police powers.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | May 2, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives passed legislation yesterday barring the use of genetic information in job and health insurance decisions, moving the government to the cusp of enacting the first federal law dealing with DNA-based medical care. "It really is the law catching up to science," said Rep. Judy Biggert, an Illinois Republican who helped lead the 13-year fight for the legislation. The House approved the measure 414-1, with Rep. Ron Paul, a Texas Republican, the lone dissenter.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | April 25, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Coming to grips with the growing role of genetic testing in American life, Congress acted yesterday to outlaw the use of genetic information in employment or insurance decisions. The Senate approved a measure, which the House of Representatives is expected to ratify and President Bush to sign, that would become the first federal law dealing with the growing role of genetics in the prediction, diagnosis and individualized treatment of disease. Many patients who could benefit have refused genetic testing out of fear of discrimination, experts say, and potentially groundbreaking research into the molecular causes of disease has been stymied because possible study subjects, fearing repercussions, refuse to participate.
NEWS
By Karen H. Rothenberg | May 9, 2007
Genetic research holds great promise to unlock new diagnoses and new treatments, and even to help create pharmaceutical therapies tailored to an individual's genetic makeup. But scientific research and development cannot progress without clinical trials, and these trials can move forward only if the individuals who could benefit are willing to participate. For that to happen, people must believe that their genetic information will not be used to deny them health care coverage or a job. A pair of groundbreaking studies reported last week show that researchers have discovered a genetic variation that increases the risk of heart disease by up to 60 percent.
NEWS
By Bryn Nelson and Bryn Nelson,Newsday | February 9, 2007
Scientists have assembled the genetic blueprint of a thoroughbred mare, a rough draft of its entire DNA sequence that may point the way toward a better understanding of equine evolution, physiology and the dozens of diseases found in both horses and humans. Claire Wade, a lead member of the sequencing team and a senior research scientist at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Mass., said the assembled genome still contains sizable gaps and has not been thoroughly analyzed. Nevertheless, she and other researchers said its estimated 2.7 billion units, or letters, of DNA should provide a wealth of new information.
NEWS
April 5, 2000
baltimorecity.gov LET'S HEAR IT for Frank Perrelli. With just $150 for an extra piece of software, the planning department graphic designer has created a breakthrough Web site for Baltimore city government. Unlike the City Council's much-ballyhooed $150,000 Web site (which is still a bust), the Perrelli version -- baltimorecity.gov -- actually gives citizens useful information. It contains Mayor Martin O'Malley's transition task force reports and recommendations. The new crime-fighting strategy, too, will be on the Web. A Web site, though, is only as good as its links.
NEWS
By Ralph Brave | February 13, 2001
THE SCIENTISTS who are mapping the human genome are telling us not to get our hopes up for genetic cures for disease anytime soon. And even when they will be available, good luck getting yours. Amid the recent exciting news of successful research on the human genome, these scientists are signaling that as advances in genetics accelerate, the scientific and medical communities have failed to secure some of the most rudimentary protections that they consider essential to prevent the misuse of genetic information.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff | February 4, 2007
Karen Rothenberg says that almost as soon as scientists realized that they could map the human genome, there was also a realization that there were ethical and legal issues involved. "Pretty early in the process, Congress started setting aside money to look at the ethical and social implications of the Human Genome Project," she says of the government agencies involved in the research over a decade ago. Now dean of the University of Maryland's School of Law, Rothenberg has made something of a specialty of the intersection of medicine, science and the law. She is the founding director of the school's Law and Health Care program and took a leave in 1995 to work at the National Institutes of Health in the Office of Research on Women's Health.
NEWS
March 6, 2003
Harold Amos, 84, professor emeritus of microbiology and molecular genetics at Harvard Medical School and the school's first African-American department chairman, died Feb. 27 at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston from complications of a stroke. Dr. Amos was highly regarded as a researcher and teacher, and a friend as well as a mentor to hundreds of young people, especially minority scientists. In 1958, he discovered that a compound once considered only in relation to DNA -- the carrier of genetic information -- also was present in RNA, the ribonucleic acid concerned with the transfer of amino acids.
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