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Genetic Engineering

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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 21, 1998
LOS ANGELES -- For years, molecular biologists and geneticists have trod gingerly around the most explosive topic of the new reproductive biology: purposely making genetic changes in people that would persist for generation after generation.There were so many technological roadblocks to the process, called germline genetic engineering, that most scientists viewed almost as science fiction.But now, as researchers rush past these roadblocks, a group of eminent molecular biologists and molecular geneticists met yesterday on the leafy campus of the University of California at Los Angeles to confront the issue.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 1, 2013
Roots Market, an organic grocer in Clarksville and Olney, plans to highlight non- genetically modified ingredients this month. "Genetically modified organisms" or GMOs, are plants or animals created through gene splicing techniques of biotechnology, or genetic engineering, according to the Non-GMO Project, a nonprofit working to build sources of non-GMO products. The group, which designated October as non-GMO Month, says the experimental technology, which merges DNA from different species, creates unstable combinations of plant, animal, bacterial and viral genes.
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TOPIC
By Henry Silverman | February 18, 2001
A COUPLE IS asked by a futuristic fertility physician to decide which traits they wish for their unborn child. From a menu not unlike one sees in a restaurant, one can choose eye color, height, sex, musical talents, athletic abilities and intelligence, to name just a few. The chosen genes are inserted into the woman's egg, which is then fertilized and implanted in the woman's uterus to achieve pregnancy. Too futuristic and far-fetched? Maybe. But then again, maybe not. Recently, scientists presented their first interpretations of the human genome, part of an ongoing process that is expected in time to revolutionize medicine by treating disease at its genetic roots.
NEWS
October 6, 2010
Here is an intriguing recipe: Take an ordinary Atlantic salmon, add hormones from a Chinook salmon and an eel-like fish called an ocean pout, and voila ! You have a super-sized salmon, one that grows twice as fast as normal. This recipe has the producers of the fish, the Massachusetts firm AquaBounty Technologies, salivating, promising as it does a plump product in record time. It also has its critics, who have questioned whether it is safe for all consumers and who have raised concerns about its effect on the environment.
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2004
Dr. Jim Wilson never intended to create supermonkeys. A pioneer in genetic engineering, he was experimenting with a way to insert single genes into muscle cells, a technique that could someday be used to treat a variety of genetic illnesses. He chose a gene that boosts levels of erythropoietin, or EPO, a key hormone in the production of oxygen-toting red blood cells and a convenient marker to measure the success of his experiment. But EPO has long had another claim to fame. Its synthetic version, created in the 1980s to treat anemia, is one of the most notorious performance-enhancing drugs in competitive sports, able to increase endurance by raising the oxygen supply to muscles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | February 23, 2003
All Over Creation, by Ruth Ozeki. Viking. 400 pages. $24.95. It was Iris Murdoch who once opined that "a novelist should be wary of being a teacher in a didactic sense, but should be conscious of himself as a moralist." Still, it is only the truly exceptional novelist who can turn issues into stories, politics into dreams. Rare is the book that succeeds as indoctrination or instruction, while at the same time delivering indelible characters, pitch-perfect dialogue, wholly involving plot.
NEWS
November 15, 1999
Chamber will hold forum on business forecastThe Baltimore/Washington Corridor Chamber of Commerce will sponsor a forum, "Business Forecast 2000: Our Economic Outlook," from 7: 30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Thursday at the Sheraton International Hotel at the Baltimore-Washington International Airport.Among the issues to be discussed are regional transportation, investment in high technology growth, competition for regional and national business headquarters and divisions, labor availability, education and training, quality of life and economic objectives.
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | June 18, 1993
JURASSIC Park" has arrived, and when Hollywood and science mix, watch out. Those who make movies like their scientists mad, bad and more than a tad morally corrupt. From Dr. Frankenstein and his goofing around with corpses and electricity to the folks in white coats whose nuclear shenanigans brought you Godzilla and Mothra, the silver screen has had few kind words for nerds with advanced degrees in science and technology."Jurassic Park" falls smack in the cinematic tradition that holds that science ain't no friend of yours or mine.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | February 20, 1991
A proposal to develop regulations simplifying the approval of genetically engineered crops, pesticides and animals would mean less red tape for Maryland companies involved in genetic engineering.In a report releasedyesterday by the White House Council on Competitiveness, headed by Vice President Dan Quayle, the panel urges regulators to evaluate products made through gene splicing just as they would treat comparable products made through traditional methods."I think it's important that we regulate according to product rather than process," said Rita Colwell, director of the Maryland Biotechnology Institute.
NEWS
By Gregg Easterbrook | December 12, 1999
CORN that is genetically modified to include a natural insecticide, cotton that has been engineered to tolerate herbicides -- if you've been reading about such new transgenic crops, you may be asking yourself, "Why do we need this stuff?" After all, American farmers already turn out plenty of high-quality food at low prices.Yes, it's true that most genetically modified crops now available are barely distinguishable from what they supplant, and so far they have not led to such promised advances as big reductions in the need for agricultural chemicals.
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2004
Dr. Jim Wilson never intended to create supermonkeys. A pioneer in genetic engineering, he was experimenting with a way to insert single genes into muscle cells, a technique that could someday be used to treat a variety of genetic illnesses. He chose a gene that boosts levels of erythropoietin, or EPO, a key hormone in the production of oxygen-toting red blood cells and a convenient marker to measure the success of his experiment. But EPO has long had another claim to fame. Its synthetic version, created in the 1980s to treat anemia, is one of the most notorious performance-enhancing drugs in competitive sports, able to increase endurance by raising the oxygen supply to muscles.
NEWS
By Jamie Talan and Jamie Talan,NEWSDAY | August 24, 2004
Increasing the activity of a single gene turns a mere rodent into Mighty Mouse, according to a new study. California scientists have genetically engineered an animal that has more muscle, less fat and more physical endurance than its littermates - it runs twice as far as expected. "We were quite surprised," said Ronald M. Evans, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, Calif. "Most people think that increased endurance comes from training. But we've been able to re-create this entire exercise network by increasing the activity of a single protein."
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
For more than half a century, researchers have tried to create a vaccine against Group A streptococcus, the nasty infectious bacteria that cause strep throat and rheumatic fever - and kill up to half a million people a year in the developing world. They might finally be on the right track. In a study published in today's issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association, scientists report that a new strep vaccine showed strong signs of working in humans and is also safe. "This is an important first step," said the study's lead author, University of Maryland vaccine researcher Karen Kotloff.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2004
The federal government and industry should step up efforts to spot potential hazards in all genetically modified foods before they reach the marketplace, a National Research Council panel concluded yesterday. In a report likely to re-ignite a long-smoldering debate between agricultural interests and critics of genetically engineered foods, scientists said there's a potential for danger whenever the genetic makeup of a food is deliberately changed. "All evidence to date indicates that any breeding technique that alters a plant or animal - whether by genetic engineering or other methods - has the potential to create unintended changes in the quality or amounts of food components that could harm health," said Bettie Sue Masters, the University of Texas chemist who headed the group.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | February 23, 2003
All Over Creation, by Ruth Ozeki. Viking. 400 pages. $24.95. It was Iris Murdoch who once opined that "a novelist should be wary of being a teacher in a didactic sense, but should be conscious of himself as a moralist." Still, it is only the truly exceptional novelist who can turn issues into stories, politics into dreams. Rare is the book that succeeds as indoctrination or instruction, while at the same time delivering indelible characters, pitch-perfect dialogue, wholly involving plot.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2002
It's a brave new world in the barnyard. Cloned cows are becoming commonplace just five years after scientists created the first one, a Holstein steer named Gene. A handsome black-and-white Holstein heifer, created from a few cells scraped out of a champion's ear, sold for a mere $31,000 in Westminster yesterday. A Midwestern milk cow syndicate bought her, paying more than 10 times the going price for a fairly good milk cow. But the unromantically named Ada 3-ETN went for far less than the first commercially available Holstein clones, which sold at national auctions a little more than a year ago. Spotlights, smoke machines and other hoopla surrounded those clones, which sold before they were born for $80,000 to $100,000.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | November 11, 1991
On a clear fall afternoon, Kathy Valderas watches her 2-year-old son play in the front yard and wonders if the grass, air and water in their Arbutus neighborhood will still be safe in a year or two.The nearby University of Maryland Baltimore County campus is the leading contender to house the state's $22 million biotechnology processing center.Residents worry that the center, and biotechnology developments likely to follow it, will expose them to harmful, genetically engineered microbes."If it was something as simple as a smokestack factory, we could see [the risks]
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 12, 1993
BERLIN -- The ninth international meeting on AIDS ended yesterday after 5,500 presentations that showed little more than incremental gains in scientific knowledge about the disease."
TOPIC
By Jeremy Rifkin | October 7, 2001
For the first few days after last month's terrorist attacks, we worried about more commercial airplanes being hijacked and used as missiles. Now we are worried about a new, more deadly threat: bacteria and viruses raining from the sky over populated areas, infecting and killing millions of people. Even more troubling is the fact that the genetic engineering technology being used commercially in the fields of agriculture, animal husbandry and medicine today is potentially convertible to the development of a wide range of pathogens that can attack plant, animal and human populations.
TOPIC
By Henry Silverman | February 18, 2001
A COUPLE IS asked by a futuristic fertility physician to decide which traits they wish for their unborn child. From a menu not unlike one sees in a restaurant, one can choose eye color, height, sex, musical talents, athletic abilities and intelligence, to name just a few. The chosen genes are inserted into the woman's egg, which is then fertilized and implanted in the woman's uterus to achieve pregnancy. Too futuristic and far-fetched? Maybe. But then again, maybe not. Recently, scientists presented their first interpretations of the human genome, part of an ongoing process that is expected in time to revolutionize medicine by treating disease at its genetic roots.
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