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NEWS
January 21, 2010
As I watch the horror unfold in Haiti, I find solace in the immeasurable generosity of so many countries and individuals. The United States was foremost in its efforts to aid this stricken country. On the heels of the U.S., Israel, a country the size of New Jersey, immediately sent enough people and supplies to set up a 100-bed field hospital. Many other countries and individuals have followed suit. Although constantly belittled by the religious right and ultra conservatives as not being real Americans, many celebrities are setting up telethons and raising millions of dollars.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 18, 2013
It's charity time, and not just because the holiday season reminds us to be charitable. As the tax year draws to a close, the charitable tax deduction beckons. America's wealthy are its largest beneficiaries. According to the Congressional Budget Office, $33 billion of last year's $39 billion in total charitable deductions went to the richest 20 percent of Americans, of whom the richest 1 percent reaped the lion's share. The generosity of the super-rich is sometimes proffered as evidence they're contributing as much to the nation's well-being as they did decades ago, when they paid a much larger share of their earnings in taxes.
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NEWS
December 26, 2011
The front page of The Sun recently reminded me that there are individuals who still practice "good will. " The Baltimore County couple, Stephanie and Edwin Greenberg, are volunteers who helped a badly injured Marine fly to Miami on a chartered jet ("Glyndon couple helps an injured warrior take flight," Dec. 22). This was achieved via the Veterans Airlift Command that offers service to very badly injured military personnel who would find it nearly impossible to fly on commercial flights.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
The nation's Roman Catholic bishops took a step Tuesday toward aligning themselves with Pope Francis, selecting as their next president Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Ky. — a man who built a career on a foundation of personal faith and service to the poor. Kurtz, 67, was the overwhelming choice of the nearly 300 prelates on hand for the annual fall meeting of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops at the Waterfront Marriott Hotel in Baltimore. The Pennsylvania native received 125 of the 236 votes cast to easily outpoll the second-place finisher, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, for a first-ballot victory.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 26, 2011
I was a victim of generosity on Saturday, the target of someone's random act of kindness, and I've had a weird reaction to the whole thing. I couldn't find anything for the condition at Rite Aid, so I thought I'd just write about it. In fact, I'm required to do this, aren't I? I mean, someone does something nice for you - no matter how small or contrived the deed - there's like a law that says you have to tell everyone about it. You are required, as a member of the human race, to let others know that a wonderful thing has happened as a way of proving that all is not lost and that, within this big old world, there's still a beautiful brotherhood of man, yadda yadda yadda.
NEWS
August 16, 2010
How wonderful to read that all city pools will be open until Labor Day thanks to the generosity of private donations from the community ("Council calls off emergency meeting on pools," Aug. 12). At the League for People with Disabilities, we understand and are very appreciative of the many generous donors in the Baltimore community. We have embarked on a campaign to raise $1 million to rebuild and restore our 42-year-old therapeutic indoor pool specifically designed for individuals with disabilities in the Baltimore community.
EXPLORE
October 21, 2011
I want to thank the Arbutus Times and Catonsville Times and the communities they serve for the items that folks continue to drop off here at the station. Because of the constant and gracious donations, a total of 202 boxes were mailed overseas in the last two weeks. This is the largest amount of material sent overseas to this date. To put it in perspective, the last shipment was 167 boxes. We can never thank you and your readers enough. We hope the items continue to come in. If not for this area, the program would not endure in such a successful way. We count upon ongoing support.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | November 22, 1994
NEW YORK -- At least 383 lucky people will be remembering Milton Petrie at Thanksgiving.In life, the philanthropist and retailer often was compared to TV's "The Millionaire" for his random acts of generosity to injured police, disaster victims and other strangers he'd read about in the newspapers.In death, Mr. Petrie only enhanced his reputation.Though his widow, Carroll Petrie, his children and other family members are amply provided for in his will, Mr. Petrie, who died Nov. 6, set aside $90 million of his $940 million fortune for hundreds of friends, acquaintances and strangers.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 20, 2002
THE VILLAIN Calvera said, "Generosity, that was my first mistake," as he peered ominously from beneath his mega-sombrero at the gringo gunman in the classic scene from the 1960 film The Magnificent Seven. The testosterone is practically gushing off the screen as Calvera, played by a distinctly non-Hispanic Eli Wallach, continues to lecture the seven Anglos hired by hapless peasants to stop him. "I leave these people a little extra," Calvera continued, "and then they hire these men to make trouble.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Dowie and Mark Dowie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 2003
The hardest thing for anyone writing about philanthropy to fathom is motive. Why do people give away money? Are they driven by religious fervor, the urge to avoid taxation, guilt, noblesse oblige, a desire for immortality, a hidden agenda, narcissism, altruism or a psychopolitical admixture of some or all of the above? Do rich people, who seem to donate proportionately less of their wealth than others, give it away for reasons different from those of the poor or people of average means?
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 10, 2013
Among the likely Democratic candidates for Maryland governor in 2014 - Howard County executive Ken Ulman, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, Attorney General Doug Gansler - Ulman comes closest to being the "Baltimore-area candidate. " But a genuine Baltimore-area candidate - someone who could pull votes from Baltimore County and the city, and enough in other key sectors of the state - would be a serious contender for the big-daddy chair in Annapolis. And who might that be? Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger, the six-term congressman and former Baltimore County executive, "is considering it," says his spokeswoman, Jaime Lennon.
NEWS
March 19, 2013
As a resident of downtown Baltimore, I'm struck by the amenities offered to the homeless ("Aid for street people failing," March 18). There are long lines in front of Health Care for the Homeless on the Fallsway, and it appears My Sister's Place across the street from the Pratt Library's main branch is doing a thriving business. The list goes on and on, so my question is: With so many venues offering assistance, why is homelessness still "epidemic" in Baltimore? Your article failed to investigate the origins of Baltimore's homeless problem.
EXPLORE
March 8, 2012
Editor: CASA of Harford County would like to extend a tremendous thank you to all of the individuals and companies that helped to make our second annual Bull and Oyster Roast on Feb 25, such a huge success. Thank you first to Sterling Caterers of Jarrettsville Gardens for providing such a wonderful location for our event. Thank you to all of our hardworking volunteers who worked tirelessly to make sure the event went off without a hitch. Most importantly, CASA of Harford County would like to thank the business community here in Harford County for their generosity in choosing to sponsor our event.
NEWS
December 26, 2011
The front page of The Sun recently reminded me that there are individuals who still practice "good will. " The Baltimore County couple, Stephanie and Edwin Greenberg, are volunteers who helped a badly injured Marine fly to Miami on a chartered jet ("Glyndon couple helps an injured warrior take flight," Dec. 22). This was achieved via the Veterans Airlift Command that offers service to very badly injured military personnel who would find it nearly impossible to fly on commercial flights.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 19, 2011
As readers of this column know, I was recently the victim of a random act of kindness. An unidentified mensch in a vehicle ahead of mine paid my $5 toll at the Perryville booths on Interstate-95. (Some days it pays to leave your E-ZPass at home.) I reported feeling odd about the gesture, wondering what the point was. Several readers - more than I had anticipated - understood my reaction; they agreed that random generosity doesn't seem nearly as meaningful without the giver of the gift knowing who the receiver is, if not by name then at least by need.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
Robert Stone was a healthy baby until he was 13 months old. Then, over three or four days, he became unresponsive and lost the use of his limbs. His bewildered parents put him through one medical test after another, each yielding inconclusive results. The tests have remained mostly inconclusive for the past 13 years. The next step for the Stone family is to pay to have the boy's genetic material mapped in an attempt to find the cause of his illness. But that costs a minimum of $7,500, and insurance doesn't cover it. So the family has turned to the Internet and a new Baltimore startup — a nonprofit founded by a Johns Hopkins University graduate student — for help.
NEWS
By RICHARD B. SCHMITT and RICHARD B. SCHMITT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff still has connections in the capital - more than 250 of them to be precise - including prominent lawyers, religious leaders and a member of Congress. In letters to U.S. District Judge Paul C. Huck, they are urging leniency when Abramoff is sentenced tomorrow in a Miami fraud case, saying that the picture of Abramoff that has emerged through the news media is a gross distortion and that he deserves a break. Far from his depiction as a greedy lobbyist who stole from Indian tribes, defrauded the Internal Revenue Service and tried to bribe public officials, they say, Abramoff is a man of charity and good works.
NEWS
October 3, 1996
LATE 20th CENTURY Americans can be selfish beings -- consumed with life in our own back yards, too busy with day-to-day hassles to expend much angst on others' troubles. But we have a soft spot for specific hard-luck stories, for tragedies with faces. Little Jessica stuck in a well. Five children orphaned when a car strikes their mother in front of Meyerhoff Hall. Every so often our emotions are tripped by someone's troubles. Then our largess can be overwhelming.So it has been with Sun reporter Lorraine Mirabella's story about a desperate Northeast Baltimore family.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 31, 2011
Reader reaction to last Thursday's column - about my response to an anonymous driver paying my $5 toll at the Perryville booths on Interstate 95 - ran from, "Dan, you cynic, that was a nice thing for someone to do; I hope the generous stranger didn't read your ungrateful column," to, "Dude, that happened to me once; it's pretty weird. " Can I just say something? (Of course I can; it's my column.) To each his own when it comes to executing random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 26, 2011
I was a victim of generosity on Saturday, the target of someone's random act of kindness, and I've had a weird reaction to the whole thing. I couldn't find anything for the condition at Rite Aid, so I thought I'd just write about it. In fact, I'm required to do this, aren't I? I mean, someone does something nice for you - no matter how small or contrived the deed - there's like a law that says you have to tell everyone about it. You are required, as a member of the human race, to let others know that a wonderful thing has happened as a way of proving that all is not lost and that, within this big old world, there's still a beautiful brotherhood of man, yadda yadda yadda.
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