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Generation Gap

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NEWS
December 11, 1992
Thirty years ago, the "generation gap" referred to the cultura clash between the great demographic fertility bulge of people born between 1943 and 1960 -- the "Baby Boomers" -- and the "GI Generation" (1901-1924) that fought WWII. Today, however, a new generation gap is emerging between the grown-up "Baby (( Boomers," now in their thirties and forties, and the teen-agers and twentysomethings of the age cohort just behind them.fTC The experience of these younger Americans, the 13th generation counting back to the peers of Ben Franklin, has been markedly different from that of the Baby Boomers who preceded them, according to Neil Howe and William Strauss writing in the December issue of Atlantic magazine.
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NEWS
BiJoe Burris | May 19, 2014
Talk about generation gap. During a Saturday commemoration speech at Morgan State University's commencement, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder lauded Morgan State's band and choir, which  moments earlier had rendered a crowd pleasing performance. Then the 63-year-old Holder turned to the band and asked, “Do you all know Flash Light?” referring to the 1978 hit song by funk troupe Parliament. The song peaked at Number One on the Billboard R&B charts and helped popularize the group's brand of music that became known as P-Funk.
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NEWS
By Nathan Bierma | January 25, 2004
CHICAGO -- If what we watch on television sends signals about how we see the world, then older and younger generations seem to be on different wavelengths. A recent chart in The New York Times compared the list of the top 10 TV programs for viewers ages 18 to 49 with the top 10 shows for viewers 50 and older over five weeks. The differences were striking. For younger viewers, the top show was Friends, followed by CSI, ER, Will and Grace and Scrubs. For viewers over 50, CSI reigned, followed by Everybody Loves Raymond, 60 Minutes, Cold Case and Jag. Only CSI, its offspring CSI: Miami, and Law and Order made both lists.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The generation gap that many credit with moving the needle on same-sex marriage apparently crosses party lines. According to a new Pew Research Center survey , 61 percent of Republicans under 30 -- a clear majority -- favor allowing same-sex marriage, while 35 percent oppose it. That's a marked difference from both their older counterparts and the party at large. Only 27 percent of Republicans over 50 support allowing gay and lesbian couples to wed, according to the poll, compared with 39 percent approval from Republicans overall.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | November 21, 1992
While thumbing through a 20-year-old comic book I'd unearthed in my basement, I came across an ad for G.I. Joe, probably the most famous doll for boys in the history of dolls for boys. Under a picture of the miniature soldier in full battle regalia was this jingle: ''G.I. Joe, G.I. Joe, fighting man from head to toe, on the land, on the sea, in the air.''The pitch was so simple, so wholesome, so . . . ancient. No, they don't make children's advertising like that anymore.The core theme for products pitched to young people nowadays is this: Be radical.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 22, 1996
BOSTON -- Who could have predicted this? The Baby Boomer generation is turning 50 and dad wants to take back the keys to the car.On Monday, Bill Clinton hit the big Five-Oh. By the most optimistic actuarial table, he is middle-aged and eligible for membership in the AARP. Something he dearly wants to avoid.The president left his 40s Sunday night with a celebration at Radio City Music Hall where Whoopie Goldberg warned that "pretty soon the Secret Service will be jogging ahead of you."But just last week, Bob Dole, the opponent old enough to be his father, launched his campaign for the White House with a paean to the advantages of age and, by implication, the disadvantages of "youth."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 24, 1992
The likely fall campaign between President Bush and Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton will be the first electoral collision between the two generations that have dominated American life for the past 45 years.At age 67, Mr. Bush is, in all probability, the last who will be drawn from the "GI generation," presidents who fought as young men in World War II, manned the barricades of the Cold War and who have held the Oval Office without interruption since former President Kennedy captured the presidency more than 31 years ago.If Mr. Clinton, 45, holds on to win the Democratic race, he would become the first presidential nominee from the baby boom -- the 76-million-member generation that has revolutionized America's social mores, but not yet exerted the political influence many of its members have considered their birthright since the turbulent 1960s.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | May 20, 2010
We've all heard about America's aging population, its immigration challenges and its fiscal irresponsibility — but we rarely think about how these disparate, disturbing trends intersect. Think about the "cultural generation gap," a compelling concept introduced in a Brookings Institution report this month. The concept and its implications take a bit of construction and deconstruction, but its long-term significance for 21st Century America could be as great as the effects that the turn-of-the-20th-Century immigrant influx, the creation of Social Security and the baby boom had on the 20th Century.
NEWS
December 29, 1992
FROM "The New Generation Gap," by Neil Howe and Willia Strauss in the December issue of the Atlantic:"A quarter century ago kids called older people names. These days, the reverse is true. For the past decade Thirteeners have been bombarded with study after story after column about how dumb, greedy and just plain bad they supposedly are."They can't find Chicago on a map. They don't know when the Civil War was fought. They watch too much TV, spend too much time shopping, seldom vote, cheat on tests, don't read newspapers and care way too much about cars, clothes, shoes and money . . ."
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | May 19, 2014
Talk about generation gap. During a Saturday commemoration speech at Morgan State University's commencement, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder lauded Morgan State's band and choir, which  moments earlier had rendered a crowd pleasing performance. Then the 63-year-old Holder turned to the band and asked, “Do you all know Flash Light?” referring to the 1978 hit song by funk troupe Parliament. The song peaked at Number One on the Billboard R&B charts and helped popularize the group's brand of music that became known as P-Funk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Al Shipley, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Charlie Wilson has been alive for 58 years, and has been singing for nearly all of them — first in his church choir and then in the Gap Band, the pioneering funk group he formed at the age of 14 with his brothers Ronnie and Robert. That long, remarkable career has reached an unlikely new peak with Wilson's success as a solo artist. This weekend, he'll be headlining the African American Heritage Festival on a bill that includes other R&B acts Chrisette Michele, Estelle and Lil Mo. Wilson credits his continued good fortune to his instrument.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | November 15, 2010
When he ran for president in 2008, Barack Obama said he didn't believe in a country divided into Blue America and Red America. But the "shellacking" the president and his fellow Democrats took in the 2010 midterm elections made clear that there sure is plenty of political tension between Grey America and Colorful America. By that, I mean there is a striking contrast between the older, whiter generation of Americans who turned two weeks ago and the younger, more racially diverse electorate that turned out two years ago. Before turning to the implications of this generational tension, let's examine the differences between those two electorates.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | May 20, 2010
We've all heard about America's aging population, its immigration challenges and its fiscal irresponsibility — but we rarely think about how these disparate, disturbing trends intersect. Think about the "cultural generation gap," a compelling concept introduced in a Brookings Institution report this month. The concept and its implications take a bit of construction and deconstruction, but its long-term significance for 21st Century America could be as great as the effects that the turn-of-the-20th-Century immigrant influx, the creation of Social Security and the baby boom had on the 20th Century.
ENTERTAINMENT
By dave rosenthal and nancy johnston and dave rosenthal and nancy johnston,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
Jessica Anya Blau's first novel, The Summer of Naked Swim Parties, was a fixture on summer reading lists. Part memoir, part fiction, it tells of a 14-year-old California girl with free-wheeling parents. We asked Blau, a Baltimorean who teaches in the Johns Hopkins University's writing program, about the novel, her book tour and what's next. Here are excerpts from that interview; a longer version and the complete audio are posted on Read Street. Why not just write a memoir? I guess the reason is that when it comes to writing, I like to have control over everything, and when you write a memoir you have to have an allegiance to the truth.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 19, 2008
Lakeview Terrace starts out mixing social burlesques and melodrama and ends up one more failed thriller about men behaving badly - and stupidly. Interracial couple Chris and Lisa Mattson (Patrick Wilson and Kerry Washington) move to an L.A. suburb and almost immediately suspect their neighbor, Abel Turner (Samuel L. Jackson), a veteran black cop, is plotting to drive them out of the neighborhood. This movie is so obvious, the audience never suspects: It knows. Abel reacts like a pop-eyed fool to the realization that Chris is not a mover, but Lisa's husband.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | April 7, 2008
Croquet is a white-glove, pressed-linen kind of sport. But the two teams competing yesterday were more than just civil during the annual match-up in Annapolis. Before the first stroke, the teams settled on the final score. A tie - 0-0. Rain forced the tournament between St. John's College and Ginger Cove retirees, dubbed the "Generation Gap," to be canceled. "It's the first time we've had a tie, isn't it?" said Ian Hanover, a St. John's College senior, shaking hands with Bill Krause, an 86-year-old retired chemical company manager.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | February 21, 1992
When it comes to appropriate environmental behavior around the house, Father doesn't know best. Neither does Mother.A national poll says it is the youngsters who not only worry more about the declining planet but also are doing more about it.This emerging environmental "generation gap" is the overriding message in a survey conducted by Peter D. Hart Research Associates Inc., a Washington-based public opinion analyst. Although the environmental movement has been nurtured by millions of adult Americans since the 1970s, the survey notes, "Today much of the impetus for the green revolution is coming from a new generation of kids and teen-agers."
NEWS
September 13, 1999
Endless summerTHIS summer's free outdoor film series in Little Italy was a big hit. Now that the summer is over, what's next?Here is a possibility. A cinema in London is having quite a bit of success with movie karaokes. It has sub-titled all the songs in "The Sound of Music," enabling audiences to sing together.Tickets have sold like hot cakes. And some theater goers have come dressed up for the parts. Women and men have worn nuns' costumes. And there have been lederhosen and Austrian dresses to evoke the von Trapp children.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | December 23, 2007
Leave our threads alone, Harford County students say. A poll conducted recently revealed a generational divide. Among Harford County public school students, 87.9 percent opposed uniforms, while the school system's teachers and administrators were overwhelmingly in favor of them. The voluntary survey had a 47.7 percent participation rate. Among parents, 58.4 percent indicated that they support mandatory uniforms. Troy Shuman, a senior at C. Milton Wright High School in Bel Air, said uniforms would be "teaching conformity and squelching individual thought."
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | June 8, 2006
The LPGA began the 2006 season promoting its youth, in particular a rookie class with glittering resumes and at least one second-year player, Paula Creamer, who had already proved she could compete with the best in the world. The veterans seemed to be an afterthought. As the women's tour sets up shop at Bulle Rock golf course in Havre de Grace for the McDonald's LPGA Championship starting with the opening round today, a message has been sent by those who had won tournaments long before some of these fledglings had broken par. They were not ready to relinquish the LPGA Tour - their tour - to a bunch of deftly marketed upstarts.
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