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January 8, 1991
A Mass of Christian burial for Nasma J. Hatem, a retired general store operator who belonged to community and religious groups in Havre de Grace, will be offered at 10:30 a.m. today, at St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church in the Harford County community.Mrs. Hatem, who was 82 and known to many as Nancy, died Friday after a heart attack at her home in Havre de Grace.For many years, she and her husband, Joseph T. Hatem, operated a general store that was founded by his father. Joseph Hatem died in 1968.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Keith Kratz grew up in White Hall in northern Baltimore County with happy memories of visits to the general store just across the two-lane street from his home. "It was a mom-and-pop convenience store back then," he said. "There was even a gas pump out front. " Kratz, 49, hasn't strayed far from his roots. In fact, he purchased that general store in 2001 for $170,000. His intention was to turn the property, sitting on 2.2 acres, into a home for himself and commercial space for his landscaping business, Outdoor Expressions.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | August 7, 1993
Miriam Morrison Patterson, a teacher, nurse and general store owner, died July 4 of heart failure at Manor Care Ruxton. She was 92.She was a resident of Sweet Air, where she moved after her marriage in 1923 to William B. Patterson. The couple operated Patterson's General Store at the intersection of Sweet Air and Manor roads for many years. Her husband died in 1979."The country store in those days was the community center," recalled Richard M. Patterson, her son. "The basement was the headquarters of the local savings and loan association, and there were horseshoe pitching contests there on Saturday nights as well."
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
You try to show journalists that some of their imagined rules and standard practices are without foundation,* and it is of no avail. Citations from dictionaries, evidence from corpus analysis, examples over decades or centuries from notable writers, and appeals to authorities on usage pass over them, leaving no impression. "I just write the way that sounds right to me," they say.  I have puzzled over this reluctance to be informed, and yesterday I recalled a story my father once told me that made everything fall into place.  After my grandfather died suddenly of a heart attack in 1945, my father, Raymond McIntyre, undertook to make a go of his general store in Elizaville Kentucky.  He told me that one week the man who drove the bread truck was apprehensive.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | December 28, 1994
It was the local meeting place for a generation -- a general store with a porch and filling station out front and a stove and telephone inside.But now it is one of two vacant buildings -- the other is a former parsonage next door -- that Anne Arundel Community Development Services Inc. hopes to sell to someone who will put community-oriented businesses in them and double the number of commercial buildings in the crossroads hamlet of Friendship, near the...
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
HARNEY -- What's a town like this doing without a general store?High in the northwest corner of the county, bumping against Frederick County and Pennsylvania, Harney is just about as far out of the way as Detour.The seclusion means the pay phone booth on Harney Road in the heart of town offers a caller almost as much privacy as his living room.But the sleepy streets leave residents without much to choose from in the way of one-stop shopping.When the Harney General Store closed in April, residents were forced to leave town if they wanted to buy more than the cigarettes and sodas they could get at Ridinger's Store at the corner of Harney and Conover roads.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
Within 10 minutes, one customer bought two packs of cigarettes and a gallon of milk, another a lottery ticket, and a third purchased a kit to dye Easter eggs.But the owners say the business isn't enough for them to keep the Gamber General Store open. After at least 80 years, the little shop at the corner of Routes 32 and 91 will probably close at the end of this month."We don't want to leave, but it's something that has to be done," said Charles Risko, who has owned the business with his wife, Joanne, for four years.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1997
The historic Warfield Building on Sykesville's Main Street is in the hands of an entrepreneur who wants to turn it into a general store.Loriann Pfefferkorn, owner of the Sykesville Emporium antiques and flower shop, bought the three-story brick and granite structure for $172,500 last week, a price she considers a bargain."
NEWS
By John Murphy and Brenda J. Buote and John Murphy and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
Residents of Uniontown said goodbye to a village landmark yesterday. The historic T. L. Devilbiss General Store closed its doors for the last time as dusk settled in the sleepy hollow.Loyal customers said their farewells the best way they knew how: They bought out the store, down to the last piece of penny candy."It's sad to see it close," said Anna Marie Devilbiss, 71, who shares a surname with the store owner, Caroline "Toots" Devilbiss, but is not related.Anna Marie Devilbiss moved to Uniontown 53 years ago. "For many years, it was the only store I knew," she said.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1999
A three-alarm fire destroyed a historic wood and stone building early yesterday that formerly was the Greenmount train station, post office, general store and granary off Route 30.The building, used as an antiques and crafts shop between 1983 and 1993, has been vacant since then. Greenmount is just north of Hampstead.State fire marshals said the fire broke out on the east, or railroad track side, of the building and spread throughout the post-and-beam structure.The cause of the fire has not been determined, said K. Arthur McGhee, deputy state fire marshal, who estimated the age of the two-story building at about 125 years.
FEATURES
By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
You could brave an indoor play place or children's museum with your baby, paying a hefty admission fee and hoping your tot won't get trampled by big kids. Or you could visit the Baltimore County Public Library's Storyville in Woodlawn or at the Rosedale branch. The colorful, interactive, and free play area is designed specifically for children ages 0-5. Babies can play safely in a gated-off area while older siblings play dress-up, read books, or explore Storyville's general store, post office, and puppet theater.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | March 20, 2013
Don't let the vintage sign hanging above Randy & Steve's The New General Store on Main Street in Ellicott City fool you. Everything inside is -- as their name suggests -- “new” but with an old-fashioned touch. After closing The Good Life Market on nearby Tonge Row and taking a two-year sabbatical in Madeira, Portugal, Randy Neely and his partner, Steve Archuleta, returned to downtown Ellicott City to open a store in the former location of Yates Market, which had been a Main Street mainstay for more than 100 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
Jean C. Fulton, an artist who worked in watercolors and metal, and with her husband transformed the derelict Monkton Hotel into a venue for artists and vendors, died Sunday of multiple organ failure at Sinai Hospital. The one-time Monkton and Tuscany-Canterbury resident was 79. The daughter of Wallace Oles and Charlotte Lehman Oles, Jean Carolyn Oles was born in Baltimore and raised on Enfield Road in Homeland. The family had founded the Oles Envelope Co. in 1912. After graduating from Bryn Mawr School in 1951, she attended Goucher College.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2012
Shuttered since early 2011, Sanders ' Corner will be reopening, it looks like. The Loch Raven landmark on Cromwell Bridge Road is in new hands, scouts report.  The scouts happen to be members of the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad Historical Society , who have been concerned about memorabilia inside Sanders' Corner relating to the rail  line fondly remembered as the Ma & Pa - the line's Loch Raven Station, destroyed by fire...
EXPLORE
By Pat van den Beemt | May 25, 2011
News that was once shared over a backyard fence, at a general store or over the telephone is now being emailed to thousands of North County residents. Several Hereford Zone folks have amassed email lists and when something big is happening, at least 2,000 people out here find out. Immediately. I know, because I’m on several of those lists. Just yesterday, I received an email from Cockeysville police precinct captain Marty Lurz, warning about traffic tie-ups because of William Donald Schaefer’s funeral procession.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2011
STILL POND Life isn't the same at the historic center of this Eastern Shore community since the loss of the chief social media: the post office and convenience store, both housed in a late 19th-century building badly damaged by fire last fall. It was the sort of place where you could usually figure on bumping into a neighbor, and sometimes also his pet chicken. "If we didn't have e-mail, if we didn't have the phones, we'd have the post office" and the combination deli counter, coffee shop, gas station and chat lounge that was the Market at Still Pond, said Kate O'Donnell, who lives near the five-corner crossroads about 10 miles north of Chestertown.
NEWS
By MICHELLE HOFFMAN | July 29, 1993
In this hustle-bustle world, convenience is a must. Rush to work, rush through dinner, rush to the store to pick up a few things. It seems that life plays at full speed, and everyone is just a number.In Uniontown, the pace is slower. At the town post office and Devilbiss general store, everyone has a name and is treated like one of the family.Owned and operated by siblings Caroline Devilbiss, 73, and Robert Devilbiss, 65, the combination store and post office, a substation of Westminster, is open from 7 a.m to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Saturdays.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
Some things never seem to change -- including downtown Butler.After months of speculation about the future of the north Baltimore County hamlet where chunks of commercial property have been for sale, the fate of one key piece is decided.Ann "Pat" Parks, owner of the Butler Store and Liquors, purchased for an undisclosed price this week the half-acre where her business and the community post office stand."I like things to stay just as they are in Butler," said Parks, whose family has owned the general store since 1948.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Gullard | Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2010
One of the first things a visitor will notice upon entering the Vincents' 4,000-square foot home, constructed variously in the early- to mid-19th century, is the flooring. Several different widths of planks are placed in assorted directions, sometimes in the same room, and are of different woods. Pine floors cover the kitchen and general store wing dating from 1858, while chestnut boards creak underfoot in the original 1810 structure. The second story has areas of painted pine floors.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 21, 2009
Marjorie L. "Margie" Nagle, whose family's renowned handmade ice cream kept devotees coming to their Carroll County general store for more than 80 years, died Sunday of congestive heart failure at her Snydersburg home. She was 92. Marjorie Lavinia Simmons was born on her parents' Snydersburg Road farm, and was 8 years old when she moved into a house and general store her parents built across from the farm and opened as Simmons General Store. Mrs. Nagle, a graduate of Carroll County public schools, began working in the general store with her parents when she was a child.
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