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By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
More than 500 people turned out yesterday for a hearing at which employees of the Health Care Financing Administration demanded that federal officials keep their agency in Woodlawn.The union representing most of the agency's 2,800 workers is opposing a proposal to move the parent agency of the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs to downtown Baltimore.Hundreds of HCFA employees were taken by bus to Martin's West yesterday for a hearing before the General Services Administration, the federal agency that is assessing the environmental impacts of a site on Security Boulevard in Woodlawn and another next to Oriole Park at Camden Yards.
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Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Nearly three-quarters of Americans say they have trust in federal employees , a spike in public confidence that some are attributing to last year's partial government shutdown. In a recent Battleground Poll by George Washington University, 22 percent of registered voters surveyed said they had "a lot" of confidence in federal workers , and 51 percent said they had "some. " The public's confidence in the federal workforce waned in 2012 and 2013 after scandals involving the Internal Revenue Service and the General Services Administration but rebounded after the shutdown last October.
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NEWS
September 19, 1990
A memorial service for James I. McKenney, a retired supervisor employed by the General Services Administration at the Social Security Administration headquarters in Woodlawn, will be held at noon today at the Nutter Funeral Home, 2501 Gwynns Falls Parkway.Mr. McKenney died Saturday of leukemia at his home on Sonya Road in Randallstown. He was 68.Known to his friends as Mack, Mr. McKenney retired in 1982 after 30 years with the GSA. Earlier, he was a civilian employee of the Army at Fort Meade.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 22, 2014
Humanity faces its biggest refugee crisis since World War II, and Rep. Andy Harris, the Republican congressman from Maryland's 1st District, pledges to do everything in his power to keep a tiny fraction of Central American children out of a shelter in Carroll County. Harris is a doctor, but apparently not a compassionate one. Maybe he should start his own organization as a conservative counterweight to rampant humanitarianism. He could call it Doctors With Borders, Medecins Avec Frontieres.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 18, 2001
WASHINGTON - The General Services Administration has found that departing members of the Clinton administration did not vandalize the White House during the presidential transition, as unnamed aides to President Bush and other critics had insisted. Responding to a request from Rep. Bob Barr, a Georgia Republican who asked for an investigation, the GSA found that nothing out of the ordinary had occurred. "The condition of the real property was consistent with what we would expect to encounter when tenants vacate office space after an extended occupancy," according to a GSA statement.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | August 22, 1992
The struggle over whether the headquarters for the federal Health Care Financing Administration will move to downtown Baltimore or stay in Baltimore County is not over.The joint venture that proposed a 21-story building near Oriole Park at Camden Yards has filed a protest with the Government Accounting Office (GAO) asking it to overturn the awarding of the contract to a group that would build the government complex in Woodlawn."We were robbed," said Daniel Henson III, president of the Henson Co., one of the companies in the joint venture proposing the downtown site.
NEWS
Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Nearly three-quarters of Americans say they have trust in federal employees , a spike in public confidence that some are attributing to last year's partial government shutdown. In a recent Battleground Poll by George Washington University, 22 percent of registered voters surveyed said they had "a lot" of confidence in federal workers , and 51 percent said they had "some. " The public's confidence in the federal workforce waned in 2012 and 2013 after scandals involving the Internal Revenue Service and the General Services Administration but rebounded after the shutdown last October.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake - who has gained a national reputation for welcoming Hispanic families to Baltimore - joined a growing chorus of Maryland officials Tuesday raising concerns over a proposal to turn a vacant office building in the city into a shelter for immigrant children largely from Central America. Rawlings-Blake said she has "serious concerns" about an idea being explored by the Obama administration to retrofit the massive office complex on North Greene Street known as Metro West to help contain a recent surge in unaccompanied children who are crossing the border illegally.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Baltimore County recently mailed bills for its new stormwater fees, and the Social Security Administration faces a charge of more than $35,000 for its Woodlawn headquarters. But it's unclear if the agency will pay a penny. "At this time we have not determined whether it will be appropriate to remit payment for those assessments," spokeswoman Dorothy J. Clark said. "We will study the issue and come to a decision in the near future. " The uncertainty reflects a broader murkiness on whether federal agencies will pay the new state-mandated fee. Derided by some as a "rain tax," the fees are meant to pay for pollution-reducing improvements and are generally based on a property's amount of paved or hard surfaces.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Federal officials are eying a large, vacant office building near Lexington Market on Baltimore's west side as a potential shelter for children caught entering the country illegally, an idea that met with resistance from several Maryland lawmakers on Monday. The children, most of whom are from Central America, are part of a surge of immigrants that has overwhelmed holding facilities along the Southwest border in recent weeks and forced the Obama administration into a frantic search to find shelter space elsewhere.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
The federal government will run out of money to deal with the influx of Central American children crossing the U.S. border illegally this summer if lawmakers fail to approve $3.7 billion in emergency funds, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson told a Senate panel Thursday. Meanwhile, federal officials planned to assess a former Army Reserve site in Westminster as a possible shelter for some of the children, according to a document obtained by The Baltimore Sun. The Obama administration has considered - and rejected - three other sites in Maryland.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake - who has gained a national reputation for welcoming Hispanic families to Baltimore - joined a growing chorus of Maryland officials Tuesday raising concerns over a proposal to turn a vacant office building in the city into a shelter for immigrant children largely from Central America. Rawlings-Blake said she has "serious concerns" about an idea being explored by the Obama administration to retrofit the massive office complex on North Greene Street known as Metro West to help contain a recent surge in unaccompanied children who are crossing the border illegally.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Federal officials are eying a large, vacant office building near Lexington Market on Baltimore's west side as a potential shelter for children caught entering the country illegally, an idea that met with resistance from several Maryland lawmakers on Monday. The children, most of whom are from Central America, are part of a surge of immigrants that has overwhelmed holding facilities along the Southwest border in recent weeks and forced the Obama administration into a frantic search to find shelter space elsewhere.
BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
— An effort to lure the FBI to Maryland could have a profound payoff for the state's economy, but the benefits could take years to materialize and the eventual impact would hinge on the way local officials handle the project, several of the state's top economists say. Maryland's congressional delegation has been pressing for months to make Prince George's County the new home of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which is currently headquartered in...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2013
Two years after the Obama administration relaunched an effort to get rid of surplus federal buildings, almost all of the excess property identified in Maryland remains in government hands, a review by The Baltimore Sun has found. Red tape, lack of congressional action and inadequate funding have left federal agencies stuck with at least 200 vacant or underutilized properties in the state, from closet-size storage sheds in Beltsville to an eight-story, historic office building a block from Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Baltimore County recently mailed bills for its new stormwater fees, and the Social Security Administration faces a charge of more than $35,000 for its Woodlawn headquarters. But it's unclear if the agency will pay a penny. "At this time we have not determined whether it will be appropriate to remit payment for those assessments," spokeswoman Dorothy J. Clark said. "We will study the issue and come to a decision in the near future. " The uncertainty reflects a broader murkiness on whether federal agencies will pay the new state-mandated fee. Derided by some as a "rain tax," the fees are meant to pay for pollution-reducing improvements and are generally based on a property's amount of paved or hard surfaces.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | April 12, 2012
By now you've likely heard about the infamous Las Vegas convention bash during which federal civil servants at the General Services Administration indulged in various frivolities to the tune of $823,000 of your money. That conference featured, among other things, a hired professional clown -- which is like Picasso hiring some guy from out of the Yellow Pages to paint a mural. As with political sex scandals, nothing vaults a fiscal scandal into the headlines faster than photographic or video evidence.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
The federal government will run out of money to deal with the influx of Central American children crossing the U.S. border illegally this summer if lawmakers fail to approve $3.7 billion in emergency funds, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson told a Senate panel Thursday. Meanwhile, federal officials planned to assess a former Army Reserve site in Westminster as a possible shelter for some of the children, according to a document obtained by The Baltimore Sun. The Obama administration has considered - and rejected - three other sites in Maryland.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
General Services Administration officials said Wednesday they had received nearly three dozen responses to a request for ideas about a new FBI headquarters, a potentially lucrative development that Maryland leaders hope to land in Prince George's County. State and local officials have been working behind the scenes for months to lure the FBI to Maryland if the agency leaves its 38-year-old headquarters, the J. Edgar Hoover Building, in downtown Washington. The state is competing with Virginia and Washington for the roughly 11,000 jobs associated with the facility.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | April 12, 2012
By now you've likely heard about the infamous Las Vegas convention bash during which federal civil servants at the General Services Administration indulged in various frivolities to the tune of $823,000 of your money. That conference featured, among other things, a hired professional clown -- which is like Picasso hiring some guy from out of the Yellow Pages to paint a mural. As with political sex scandals, nothing vaults a fiscal scandal into the headlines faster than photographic or video evidence.
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