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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 6, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. appointed R. Stevens Cassard Jr. as secretary of the state Department of General Services yesterday, replacing Boyd K. Rutherford, who was named to a position in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Cassard, 48, had most recently been deputy secretary. Also yesterday, Ehrlich named B. Diane Wilson deputy secretary, filling Cassard's previous position. Wilson had been assistant secretary for facilities operations and maintenance, and previously had been a facilities manager with the University of Maryland Medical System.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
The project manager who oversaw the development of Baltimore's food truck policy is expected to lead a review of charging fees for items set outside homes and businesses, under a contact the city's spending panel is asked to approve Wednesday. The Board of Estimates will decide whether to approve a $73,300 one-year contract for Babila Lima, who is the mayor's cousin, to work under the director of the Department of General Services. The city's ethics policy doesn't recognize the relationship between an elected official and their cousin in its nepotism rules.
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and William Thompson and Thomas W. Waldron and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1990
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has begun reshaping his Cabinet for his second term by forcing the departure of Earl F. Seboda, the long-time secretary of the Department of General Services, according to a well-placed source in Annapolis.Seboda, 52, has run the Department of General Services since 1983 and was a holdover from the Cabinet of Schaefer's predecessor, Harry R. Hughes.Two weeks ago Schaefer ordered his entire Cabinet and hundreds of top appointed officials to submit letters of resignation immediately.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
"Charge 'em for the lice, extra for the mice Two percent for looking in the mirror twice Here a little slice, there a little cut Three percent for sleeping with the window shut... " - "Master of the House," Les Miserables A business owner in Baltimore could be excused for feeling like he's living permanently in Monsieur Thénardier's inn from Les Miserables. On top of the highest income and property tax rates in the state, business owners here must contend with the Byzantine set of fees for what are known as "minor privileges" - everything from a table and chairs on the sidewalk outside a cafe to, rather famously, a papier mache flamingo suspended 20 feet above the ground.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2004
An off-duty police officer for the state Department of General Services was shot to death early yesterday morning outside a Parkville bar, Baltimore County police said. Albert Jerome Roulhac, 32, was walking to his car in the parking lot outside Tee-Bee's Place, a bar on Darlington Drive just north of the city line, when several gunshots hit him in the upper body, police said. Roulhac was taken to Good Samaritan Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 2 a.m., police said. A General Services police officer for two years, Roulhac was assigned to patrol the state office complex on Preston Street in Baltimore, said Anne Hubbard, a spokeswoman for General Services.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1996
Howard County government officials are moving to dissolve one department and create a new one a proposal that caused a few sparks during last night's County Council meeting."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | March 8, 1992
the Department of General Services and the Sheriff's Department -- took their turns Thursday before the commissioners, submitting what were described as "maintenance" budgets.J. Michael Evans, director of the Department of General Services, submitted proposed spending plans for fiscal 1993 for five bureaus, including administration, development review and permits and inspections, and for other programs under his charge, such as recycling.Budget requests within the Department of General Services ranged from a 7.1 percent increase in spending for the Bureau of DevelopmentReview to a 4.6 decrease in the central warehouse, a storage facility for county agencies.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Josh Cohen, who lost a tight race for re-election as Annapolis mayor, has a new job. He said this week he'll start Wednesday as the chief administrative officer for Maryland's Department of General Services, reporting to Secretary Alvin C. Collins. "After the election, I updated my resume and sent it out," said Cohen, who lost to Republican Mike Pantelides by 59 votes out of about 8,000 cast Nov. 5. "Independent of that, Secretary Collins reached out to me. We have known each other and worked together in different capacities.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 29, 1999
Two bomb threats triggered the evacuation of 6,000 state employees in four Baltimore state office buildings yesterday, but no explosive devices were found, authorities said.Police were investigating the anonymous threats, which were phoned in early yesterday to the Maryland Department of General Services, in a building it shares with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene at 201 W. Preston St., and later to the Department of Human Resources, 311 W. Saratoga St.As a precaution, officials emptied those buildings and state-owned complexes at 300 and 301 W. Preston.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
Baltimore's CitiStat director resigned Friday, after he refused a transfer to a different job in city government, administration officials said. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake on Friday informed Chad Kenney, who was named director in 2012, that she wanted to transfer him within city government, according to Kevin Harris, the mayor's spokesman. Kenney declined, and resigned instead, Harris said. "He was never asked to leave the administration. He was given the opportunity to go into a different position," Harris said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
In Baltimore, some business owners say they're constantly nagged by city fees for making improvements to their stores. Add a bike rack outside? There's a fee for that. Put up a security camera? Another fee. Add more lighting? There's a fee for that, too. That's why some are expressing disappointment that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake used her first veto since taking office in 2010 to strike down a bill aimed at reducing or eliminating many of the so-called "minor privilege" fees the city charges.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Baltimore's food truck industry will be able to petition Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration for additional places to sell their fares, under a bill approved Monday by the City Council. The legislation calls on the Department of General Services to create new "food truck zones," while also allowing the mobile vendors to operate on streets throughout the city as long as they adhere to meter restrictions, said Babila Lima, a special assistant who is guiding the process for the city.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
The city and state are putting up a $450,000 black steel fence around the downtown War Memorial to stop homeless men and women - some of whom are veterans - from sleeping on the steps under the Greek-inspired columns of the landmark building across from City Hall. Activists who work with the homeless say the new fence, to be complete by mid-June, is a "disappointing" reminder of the ways government has failed to serve vulnerable people. But stewards of the historic structure say the barrier is needed to protect the War Memorial from trespassing and the occasional campfire.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
City officials this weekend dedicated a portion of Jefferson Street in East Baltimore to honor Troy Douglas - an 8-year-old boy who was killed following a gas explosion in February. His family spent Sunday afternoon singing "Happy Birthday" at his graveside at King Memorial Park. He would have been 9. "He was a regular, 8-year-old kid," his mother, Shanika Brown, said. "His life got taken from him. It wasn't his fault. " Brown and Troy's father, also named Troy Douglas, are separated, but they and a dozen other relatives gathered at Brown's McElderry Park home after visiting the cemetery.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
In one of the city's first historic preservation battles, Baltimore residents paid $17,000 in 1924 to save the soaring Phoenix Shot Tower from a wrecking ball and a future as a Union Oil Company gas station. Today, preservationists are again rallying around the Shot Tower. While it is no longer in danger - the city has abandoned a 2012 proposal to consider selling more than a dozen historic properties, including the tower - they say more needs to be done to showcase the attraction and to fully restore what was once the nation's tallest building.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Joseph L. McCarthy, a former social worker who established, sponsored and coached baseball and soccer teams to keep East Baltimore youths away from drugs and crime, died Tuesday of congestive heart and kidney failure at Genesis Loch Raven Center. The longtime Parkville resident was 78. The son of Joseph McCarthy and Angela McCarthy Gardina, Joseph Leo McCarthy was born in Baltimore and raised in Waverly. "His father died when he was 14, and he was raised by my father, Vincent Gardina, a city courthouse clerk, and my mother, who was a C&P Telephone Co. operator," said his half brother, Vincent J. Gardina, the former Baltimore County councilman who is now director of the county's Department of Environmental Protection and Sustainability.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
The historic Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum in Baltimore, which lost its longtime curator and was shuttered in September amid an operational reorganization, has in the last month been defaced by graffiti and robbed of its wooden front steps, according to those involved in the museum's revitalization. City officials said they are aware of the damage and recently repainted the museum door, which had been scrawled with mostly illegible writings in marker. They also said they regularly check on the museum and respond to any complaints about its condition.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
In Baltimore, some business owners say they're constantly nagged by city fees for making improvements to their stores. Add a bike rack outside? There's a fee for that. Put up a security camera? Another fee. Add more lighting? There's a fee for that, too. That's why some are expressing disappointment that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake used her first veto since taking office in 2010 to strike down a bill aimed at reducing or eliminating many of the so-called "minor privilege" fees the city charges.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
A panel of advisers to an established senior center on the edge of Mount Vernon is protesting a proposal to lease space in its city-owned building to Baltimore's gay community center. The Waxter Center Advisory Council fears younger patrons of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore could disturb older patrons of the building's senior center, which has been in operation for nearly 40 years, said Lester Buster, president of the advisory council. "We just don't know whether or not that will be a good mix," said Buster, 79, of West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
I. Morton "Buddy" Schindler, an electrical engineer who oversaw the pumping operation for Baltimore's water supply system, died Friday at Sinai Hospital of complications of a fall he suffered in December. He was 87 and lived in Pikesville. Born in Baltimore and raised near Patterson Park, Mr. Schindler was a 1944 Patterson Park High School graduate. He was awarded a scholarship to the former Western Maryland College, where he studied for several months before being drafted into military service.
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