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General Schwarzkopf

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NEWS
February 2, 1991
By a division of 57 percent to 34 percent, Americans believe there should be more military censorship of Persian Gulf war news, according to a poll by the Times Mirror News Interest Index. We think that's bad news -- bad for the media, the public, the military and the policy makers.Censorship keeps news the public needs out of its hands. It also inevitably produces bum stories. There was a story in one American newspaper that said the Navy had been denied a role in stopping the massive oil slick.
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NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia | October 18, 1992
IT DOESN'T TAKE A HERO.H. Norman Schwarzkopf.with Peter Petre.Linda Grey/Bantam Books.530 pages. $25. Two months before he would launch the greatest U.S. military offensive since the Vietnam War, Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf had, by his own recollection, worked himself up "into a ferocious state" while meeting with the 22 American generals and admirals under his command.Standing before a huge map of Kuwait and Iraq, the bearish commander in chief of the U.S. Central Command outlined the battle plan for a U.S.-led attack against Iraqi forces and handed out combat assignments.
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FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 30, 1991
Washington -- What a gathering of might we have here! A uniformed Gen. Colin L. Powell gabbing to D.C. Mayor Sharon Pratt Dixon on one side, Gen. "Stormin' " Norman Schwarzkopf on the other.But wait! Something's wrong with this picture. Mayor Dixon's big, signature glasses have no lenses in them! This woman must be a fake.And Stormin'! Stormin', what's with this white clown makeup around your temples? Uh-huh! An impostor.And General Powell . . . Well, gee, Gen., what happened to your stars and Vietnam War decorations?
NEWS
September 22, 1992
Military top brass have been messing around in civilian politics since George Washington became president. This, however, does not prevent a bit of eye-rolling at the spectacle of Adm. William J. Crowe, a former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, endorsing Bill Clinton's White House bid, or Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, hero of the Persian Gulf war, questioning the Democratic candidate's qualifications to be commander-in-chief.Both of these four-star fellows have moved on to carve out lucrative careers in mufti -- Admiral Crowe as a television military commentator and General Schwarzkopf as author of a guaranteed best-seller soon to hit the book stores.
NEWS
By R. A. Zaldivar and R. A. Zaldivar,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In a heartfelt homecoming address to Congress, Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf declared yesterday that he is "damned proud" to be an American soldier and told the lawmakers that it is now up to the civilians to secure peace in the Middle East."
NEWS
By Carol Morello and Carol Morello,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 17, 1990
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, commander of U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf, said yesterday in an interview that any gulf war would be an all-out battle that could last six months or more."
NEWS
By DAVID EVANS | March 28, 1991
Dazzled by America's blitzkrieg victory over Iraq, Sen. Bob Kasten, R-Wis., has put forth a resolution that the architects of this triumph, Gens. Colin L. Powell and H. Norman Schwarzkopf, be promoted to five-star rank.''This is the least we can do,'' he said.Actually, the Congress can't do it. Mr. Kasten's resolution asks President Bush to offer such appointments, which the Senate would speedily approve. Obviously, Democrats being castigated as wimps on the war would have a hard time opposing the rush to heap honors on the commanders of America's legions as they come home to Rome.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf -- conqueror of the Iraqis, near-gainsayer of the president and outspoken scourge of anything he regards as "bovine scatology" -- showed yesterday he knew also when to shut up.The commander of U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf was honored at lunch with President Bush and top aides at the White House following his homecoming Sunday.On their way from the Oval Office, the group stopped for pictures on the steps leading to the Rose Garden, where an army of reporters and TV crews was gathered.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 28, 1991
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, overall allied commander in the Persian Gulf war, revealed yesterday that deception had been a major weapon in the defeat of Iraq.Breaking a news blackout on the coalition's battlefield strategy, General Schwarzkopf used an hourlong briefing to unveil charts showing roughly where his forces had breached Iraq's defenses and moved north.As described by General Schwarzkopf, the buildup of naval forces in the Persian Gulf, and the much-publicized rehearsals for a Marine amphibious landing, were ruses to encourage Iraq to expect an attack from the sea and to prepare its defenses accordingly.
FEATURES
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 17, 1991
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia-- He's been on the wrong end of a devastating B-52 bombing raid, stranded with his men in a minefield and wounded in action twice.Now, Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf is waging a war in the Middle East, hoping that the kind of bad luck and timing he experienced in Vietnam will not befall his troops.The gruff, burly, 56-year-old, four-star commander of U.S. forces in the region, "Stormin' Norman," as some soldiers call him, has been mindful of the mistakes made during the Vietnam War and has vowed publicly and privately not to repeat them.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia | September 8, 1991
IN THE EYE OF THE STORM:THE LIFE OF GENERALH. NORMAN SCHWARZKOPF.Roger Cohen and Claudio Gatti.Farrar, Straus & Giroux.342 pages. $19.95.If the authors of this new biography of Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf are to be believed, the battle-hardened U.S. military commander was convinced by last Oct. 1 that economic sanctions against Iraq would not loosen its grip on neighboring Kuwait. He was anxious to go to war against Iraq, whose forces had invaded Kuwait two months earlier. He had a tailor-made battle plan -- described by the authors as "astonishing in its audacity" -- and needed to get enough troops and hardware in place quickly to launch an attack in January.
NEWS
By Michael Wines and Michael Wines,New York Times News Service | June 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf complained to Congress yesterday about the quality and timeliness of intelligence given his forces during the Persian Gulf war.The general was especially critical of the analyses of intelligence provided to his staff by specialists in Washington on the Iraqi military, saying that they had been "caveated, footnoted and watered down" to the point of being useless."
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | May 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- America's latest conquering hero, U.S. Army Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, told graduating midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy yesterday that Operation Desert Storm proved that great American leadership always emerges in times of crisis."
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 30, 1991
Washington -- What a gathering of might we have here! A uniformed Gen. Colin L. Powell gabbing to D.C. Mayor Sharon Pratt Dixon on one side, Gen. "Stormin' " Norman Schwarzkopf on the other.But wait! Something's wrong with this picture. Mayor Dixon's big, signature glasses have no lenses in them! This woman must be a fake.And Stormin'! Stormin', what's with this white clown makeup around your temples? Uh-huh! An impostor.And General Powell . . . Well, gee, Gen., what happened to your stars and Vietnam War decorations?
NEWS
By R. A. Zaldivar and R. A. Zaldivar,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In a heartfelt homecoming address to Congress, Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf declared yesterday that he is "damned proud" to be an American soldier and told the lawmakers that it is now up to the civilians to secure peace in the Middle East."
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf -- conqueror of the Iraqis, near-gainsayer of the president and outspoken scourge of anything he regards as "bovine scatology" -- showed yesterday he knew also when to shut up.The commander of U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf was honored at lunch with President Bush and top aides at the White House following his homecoming Sunday.On their way from the Oval Office, the group stopped for pictures on the steps leading to the Rose Garden, where an army of reporters and TV crews was gathered.
NEWS
By Stephen E. Nordlinger and Stephen E. Nordlinger,Washington Bureau of The Sun Peter Osterlund of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | January 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- U.S. warplanes bombed oil-pumping facilities in Iraq-occupied Kuwait in what the U.S. command said yesterday appeared to be a successful attempt to stanch the flow of millions of gallons of crude oil into the Persian Gulf.Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, commander of the allied forces in Operation Desert Storm, announced that F-111 fighter bombers, using highly sophisticated technology, had attacked a coastal complex of pipes considered vital to supplying oil to offshore tanker-loading operations.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON and ERNEST B. FURGURSON,Ernest B. Furgurson is associate editor of The Sun | March 29, 1991
Washington. When the Persian Gulf war was barely over, some interviewer asked Norman Schwarzkopf whether he was interested in going into politics. He said he had no such plans.If General Schwarzkopf is as sophisticated about politics as he is about war, he knows that in Washington code, saying you have no plans is the same as saying ''Make me an offer.''He gave the world another look at his sophistication, or lack of it, the other night when he sat for an hour-long conversation with David Frost.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | March 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush telephoned Army Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf yesterday and told him "not to worry" about a flap over the end of the war with Iraq.White House aides, hoping to end the embarrassing episode, said the two were "on the same wavelength.""The president told General Schwarzkopf not to worry about this incident. The president is totally relaxed about it, and the president is convinced they are on the same wavelength," deputy White House press secretary Roman Popadiuk told reporters.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON and ERNEST B. FURGURSON,Ernest B. Furgurson is associate editor of The Sun | March 29, 1991
Washington. When the Persian Gulf war was barely over, some interviewer asked Norman Schwarzkopf whether he was interested in going into politics. He said he had no such plans.If General Schwarzkopf is as sophisticated about politics as he is about war, he knows that in Washington code, saying you have no plans is the same as saying ''Make me an offer.''He gave the world another look at his sophistication, or lack of it, the other night when he sat for an hour-long conversation with David Frost.
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