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By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1995
Dr. Anthony F. Carozza, a retired general practitioner who held several state and city medical posts, died Wednesday at St. Agnes Hospital after a stroke. He was 87 and lived at the Charlestown Retirement Community.In 1985, Dr. Carozza closed his practice, which he had maintained at his Govans home since 1937 and for a time before that in Little Italy.In 1973, he became medical director at the Edgewood Nursing Home, now the Meridian Nursing Center-Homewood, and was medical director for several other homes in the Meridian chain before his retirement in 1988.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 13, 2010
Robert James Lyden Sr., a longtime Baltimore County general practitioner who helped soothe jittery patients' nerves with Tootsie Roll pops, died Tuesday of cancer at his Rosedale home. He was 84. Dr. Lyden, the son of a tavern owner and a homemaker, was born and raised in Clarksburg, W.Va. After graduating in 1943 from St. Mary's High School in Clarksburg, he attended Mount St. Mary's College in Emmitsburg for a year before enlisting in the Navy. He served as a hospital corpsman in the Pacific before being discharged in 1946.
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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2006
Dr. Eugene J. Schnitzer, who survived the Holocaust by hiding in cellars and attics with his wife in German-occupied Czechoslovakia and later was a general practitioner in South Baltimore, died June 16 at his retirement home in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. He was 102. Born in Sabinov, in what is now Slovakia and was then Hungary, he was educated at a Roman Catholic school run by Jesuit fathers and received his medical education in Prague at the Charles University....
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2006
Dr. Eugene J. Schnitzer, who survived the Holocaust by hiding in cellars and attics with his wife in German-occupied Czechoslovakia and later was a general practitioner in South Baltimore, died June 16 at his retirement home in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. He was 102. Born in Sabinov, in what is now Slovakia and was then Hungary, he was educated at a Roman Catholic school run by Jesuit fathers and received his medical education in Prague at the Charles University....
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff writer | November 4, 1990
Sixteen county attorneys have applied for a soon-to-be-vacant seat on the District Court bench, a state courts official said Friday.The vacancy will be created when Judge Thomas J. Curley Jr. retires in February. Curley, 67, the last of the original People's Court judges still sitting on Maryland's District Court bench, announced his retirement plans in September.Although candidates were supposed to file no later than Thursday, that deadline has been extended to Nov. 13, Michael V. O'Malley, an assistant state courts administrator, said Friday.
NEWS
July 21, 1999
Dr. Edwin L. Pierpont, 80, general practitionerDr. Edwin Lowell Pierpont, a general practitioner in Baltimore County for 33 years, died Monday of heart failure at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 80 and lived in Finksburg.Dr. Pierpont opened his practice in Rockdale on Liberty Road in 1949 after spending a year in residence at the University of Iowa."He was one of the last practitioners from that great generation of family doctors," said his son-in-law Earle Flick, a veterinarian in Finksburg.
NEWS
December 28, 1994
Dr. Percival SmithGeneral practitionerDr. Percival Carlton Smith, who practiced general medicine in Baltimore since 1953, died Dec. 23 at the University of Maryland Medical Center of complications after heart surgery. The Baltimore resident was 76.Dr. Smith was born in Pembroke, Bermuda, but grew up in Boston.He graduated from the Howard University School of Medicine in 1945 and completed his residency at the old Provident Hospital on Division Street in Baltimore. He then moved to Indian Head, Charles County, where he began practicing general medicine at the Perry Wright Project.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 2002
HYDE, England - Dr. Harold Shipman, the suburban family doctor convicted two years ago of murdering 15 of his patients, actually killed at least 215 of them, an official investigation reported yesterday. The inquiry head, Judge Dame Janet Smith of the High Court, said the killing spree stretched over 23 years in which the gray-bearded, soft-spoken general practitioner built up a reputation for attentive and trustworthy medical care while systematically injecting the people in his care with lethal doses of the painkiller diamorphine.
NEWS
July 17, 1993
Dr. Martin E. StrobelGeneral practitionerDr. Martin E. Strobel, who had been a general practitioner in Reisterstown from 1948 until his 1981 retirement, died Wednesday of heart failure at a hospital in Conway, S.C.The 74-year-old Baltimore native moved to South Carolina in 1985.Reared in Braddock Heights in Frederick County, he was a graduate of Middletown High School, Gettysburg (Pa.) College and the University of Maryland medical school. He performed his internship at what was then University Hospital and a residency at Maryland General Hospital.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
There are two things to note about Dr. George Taler's black bag. The first is that he carries one at all. The second is what he puts in it: a portable computer, a digital camera, an instrument for measuring oxygen in the blood and, depending on which patient he's headed to see, a hand-held EKG machine. "You might liken it to a supercharged V-8 in a Model T frame," said Taler, director of long-term care at Washington Hospital Center. Given that most doctors' visits are made in an office or hospital setting, few physicians use a black bag any longer - and, even if they have one, it's probably on an office shelf or in the attic.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2003
As he entered his Ellicott City law office in the little white house with the rusted roof, Jim Hanson was expecting a quiet day -- one filled with preparations for a custody hearing. Within minutes, that plan was kaput, and Hanson was dispensing advice as diverse as his practice -- from the walk-in who wanted to talk about trusts to the client trying to force a business to pay what it promised for a paint job. "I come in. I sit down at my desk," Hanson said dryly. "And I just wait for chaos to roll through my door."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 2002
HYDE, England - Dr. Harold Shipman, the suburban family doctor convicted two years ago of murdering 15 of his patients, actually killed at least 215 of them, an official investigation reported yesterday. The inquiry head, Judge Dame Janet Smith of the High Court, said the killing spree stretched over 23 years in which the gray-bearded, soft-spoken general practitioner built up a reputation for attentive and trustworthy medical care while systematically injecting the people in his care with lethal doses of the painkiller diamorphine.
NEWS
July 21, 1999
Dr. Edwin L. Pierpont, 80, general practitionerDr. Edwin Lowell Pierpont, a general practitioner in Baltimore County for 33 years, died Monday of heart failure at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 80 and lived in Finksburg.Dr. Pierpont opened his practice in Rockdale on Liberty Road in 1949 after spending a year in residence at the University of Iowa."He was one of the last practitioners from that great generation of family doctors," said his son-in-law Earle Flick, a veterinarian in Finksburg.
NEWS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1995
Dr. Anthony F. Carozza, a retired general practitioner who held several state and city medical posts, died Wednesday at St. Agnes Hospital after a stroke. He was 87 and lived at the Charlestown Retirement Community.In 1985, Dr. Carozza closed his practice, which he had maintained at his Govans home since 1937 and for a time before that in Little Italy.In 1973, he became medical director at the Edgewood Nursing Home, now the Meridian Nursing Center-Homewood, and was medical director for several other homes in the Meridian chain before his retirement in 1988.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | May 9, 1995
Brandon stares ahead, listless, his eyes tinged with pink. His family doctor has found swollen glands and, peeking inside the 2-year-old's ears, claims to see Simba.No response."You're too sick to care, aren't you, sweetie?" Dr. Alex Rocha asks the sad towhead. He turns to Brandon's mother, Dawn Goodman: "He's got tonsillitis," the doctor says.A few minutes later, Dr. Rocha is talking to an 80-year-old farmer about the arthritis in his leg and stops to examine his sandpaper hands."Look at these mitts," he tells Howard Leister, who recently painted 12,000 feet of white fence.
NEWS
December 28, 1994
Dr. Percival SmithGeneral practitionerDr. Percival Carlton Smith, who practiced general medicine in Baltimore since 1953, died Dec. 23 at the University of Maryland Medical Center of complications after heart surgery. The Baltimore resident was 76.Dr. Smith was born in Pembroke, Bermuda, but grew up in Boston.He graduated from the Howard University School of Medicine in 1945 and completed his residency at the old Provident Hospital on Division Street in Baltimore. He then moved to Indian Head, Charles County, where he began practicing general medicine at the Perry Wright Project.
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