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By JANET KIDD STEWART and JANET KIDD STEWART,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 16, 2005
Religion, it seems, pays. But why? Identifying communities of frequent churchgoers, Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist Jonathan Gruber found higher incomes and education levels and less welfare participation, along with more marriages and fewer divorces, than in the general population. The "Religious Market Structure, Religious Participation and Outcomes: Is Religion Good For You?" study was published in May for the National Bureau of Economic Research. Comparing national statistics on religion and income, Gruber found higher income and education levels in communities densely populated by a particular religion.
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NEWS
By Nancy Johnston | May 23, 2009
Watch out, baby boomers. The Millennials are coming for your jobs. This generational warfare is the story developing in the media, and as with most trend stories, it does have a kernel of truth. The baby boomer generation - born between 1946 and 1964 - has had a stranglehold on nearly every arena in American life, including politics, economics and the culture wars, since I was born. Even President Barack Obama, who campaigned on a promise to leave behind the boomers' old campus feuds, is, technically, one of them.
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff Kelly Gilbert contributed to this story | April 29, 1991
Fifteen inmates at the Maryland Penitentiary have gone to court to stop state prison officials from moving them out of solitary confinement and into the general population, where they claim they would be in danger.In four lawsuits filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore over the last three weeks, the inmates claim that they fear living in close contact with other prisoners in the general population."I told them I had enemies in the general population . . . and that I was in fear for my safety," inmate William A. Niewiadomski wrote in his lawsuit.
FEATURES
By HOLLY SELBY | November 22, 2007
For many Americans, the holiday season begins today with a journey -- perhaps in a car crammed with pies, kids and the family dog or on an overbooked flight. Unfortunately, for some, the trip to Grandma's or Uncle Joe's or sister Sue's may be marred by motion sickness. About one-third of the general population may be affected by motion sickness on a regular basis, says Dr. Russell Wright, otolaryngologist and president of the medical staff at St. Joseph Medical Center. Though motion sickness is not considered medically serious, if you are the one suffering from the condition, it can feel serious indeed.
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,Los Angeles Times | January 11, 2007
During their first two weeks out of prison, former convicts have a nearly 13 times greater risk of death than the general population, according to a study published today of more than 30,000 former inmates. The leading cause was overdose of illegal narcotics, the researchers found. Though the study did not look at the reason for the high number of drug overdoses, the researchers surmised that the stress of release and the ex-prisoners' reduced tolerance to drugs after their sentences were major factors.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | October 15, 1992
Researchers investigating one of the health claims against silicone breast implants said they have failed to find any link between the devices and scleroderma, a disease of the skin and internal organs."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | October 21, 1992
The suicide rate was seven times higher among AIDS patients in the late 1980s than it was in the general population, but a statistical study published today found hopeful signs the problem may be lessening.Scientists sifting through records of the National Center for Health Statistics found evidence of 165 people with AIDS who killed themselves from 1987 through 1989.In a complex calculation, the epidemiologists found the suicide rate was 7.4 times higher among AIDS patients than it was among the U.S. adult population -- but the gap narrowed substantially during that period.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1996
A 23-year-old prison inmate filed a $200,000 suit against Baltimore County yesterday, alleging that he was raped by a cellmate in the County Detention Center and that authorities had failed to provide adequate protection.The inmate was jailed in December on battery and theft charges, said Maxine Eldridge, a prison system spokeswoman.Within days of his arrival, according to the lawsuit filed in the county Circuit Court, the inmate told a corrections officer that he had been threatened by several other prisoners and as a result he was placed in protective custody.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | November 11, 1990
At the request of inmates with the AIDS virus, the state Division of Correction has closed a special Maryland Penitentiary housing unit for them and returned the 12 prisoners who lived there to the general prison population.The unit, known as the "Living Room," was opened in August 1989 to give inmates who had been hospitalized with human immunodeficiency virus -- HIV -- a place of their own when they were returned to the prison system.But the 10-cell ward near the penitentiary's infirmary soon became a prison within a prison.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | April 14, 1993
A Maryland Penitentiary inmate serving three life sentences is conducting a hunger strike to protest conditions that include human waste backing up into shower drains and thick deposits of pigeon dung on windowsills.A spokesman at the East Baltimore prison said yesterday that 13 other inmates in the segregation unit have quit the strike that began April 4.Cpl. J. Scott McCauley, spokesman for the Division of Correction, said that the leader is continuing the protest because he wants to force his return to the prison's general population to revive a profitable business selling a fermented wine called "jump."
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,Los Angeles Times | January 11, 2007
During their first two weeks out of prison, former convicts have a nearly 13 times greater risk of death than the general population, according to a study published today of more than 30,000 former inmates. The leading cause was overdose of illegal narcotics, the researchers found. Though the study did not look at the reason for the high number of drug overdoses, the researchers surmised that the stress of release and the ex-prisoners' reduced tolerance to drugs after their sentences were major factors.
NEWS
October 2, 2006
Broad AIDS testing a good investment The Sun's editorial "Too broad a brush" (Sept. 27) expressed the opinion that widespread, routine screening for HIV-AIDS makes little sense because of the high cost. In fact, two independent estimates of the cost-effectiveness of routine screening of the general U.S. population were published in The New England Journal of Medicine in 2005. Both studies found that routine screening of the general population (in which the rate of HIV infection is about one per 1,000 people)
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART and JANET KIDD STEWART,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 16, 2005
Religion, it seems, pays. But why? Identifying communities of frequent churchgoers, Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist Jonathan Gruber found higher incomes and education levels and less welfare participation, along with more marriages and fewer divorces, than in the general population. The "Religious Market Structure, Religious Participation and Outcomes: Is Religion Good For You?" study was published in May for the National Bureau of Economic Research. Comparing national statistics on religion and income, Gruber found higher income and education levels in communities densely populated by a particular religion.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | August 28, 2005
WHETHER OR NOT Thomas Herrion's death after an NFL preseason game a week ago proves to be weight-related, the league now has an obligation to answer the most basic of health concerns. What is the price of success in the offensive line? In the tradeoff for money and fame, what is the cost to players who weigh upward of 300 pounds so they can better protect their quarterback? Herrion, a third-string guard, died shortly after he completed a 14-play drive for the San Francisco 49ers. After reportedly complaining about playing in Denver's mile-high altitude, Herrion, 23, collapsed in the locker room and died despite the best medical treatment he could have received in those circumstances.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - A drug specifically intended for use by African-Americans with congestive heart failure received a major boost yesterday when an advisory committee to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommended unanimously that the agency approve it. If the FDA accepts the committee's advice, as it usually does, BiDil would become the first drug approved in the United States for use by a particular racial or ethnic group. FDA action on the application could come next week. Black medical experts in the audience cheered the committee's vote yesterday.
TOPIC
By Cesar Chelala and Cesar Chelala,INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE | August 15, 2004
When oil was found in 1996 in Equatorial Guinea, the former Spanish colony in West Africa was one of the poorest countries in the world. Today, this small and sparsely populated country of 465,000 inhabitants has an offshore production of 350,000 barrels a day, making it the third-largest sub-Saharan producer of oil, behind Nigeria and Angola. According to the African Development Bank, a year after oil was found, gross domestic product went up 76 percent. In my role as a public health consultant, I recently visited Equatorial Guinea for the first time since 1993.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | August 28, 2005
WHETHER OR NOT Thomas Herrion's death after an NFL preseason game a week ago proves to be weight-related, the league now has an obligation to answer the most basic of health concerns. What is the price of success in the offensive line? In the tradeoff for money and fame, what is the cost to players who weigh upward of 300 pounds so they can better protect their quarterback? Herrion, a third-string guard, died shortly after he completed a 14-play drive for the San Francisco 49ers. After reportedly complaining about playing in Denver's mile-high altitude, Herrion, 23, collapsed in the locker room and died despite the best medical treatment he could have received in those circumstances.
FEATURES
By HOLLY SELBY | November 22, 2007
For many Americans, the holiday season begins today with a journey -- perhaps in a car crammed with pies, kids and the family dog or on an overbooked flight. Unfortunately, for some, the trip to Grandma's or Uncle Joe's or sister Sue's may be marred by motion sickness. About one-third of the general population may be affected by motion sickness on a regular basis, says Dr. Russell Wright, otolaryngologist and president of the medical staff at St. Joseph Medical Center. Though motion sickness is not considered medically serious, if you are the one suffering from the condition, it can feel serious indeed.
TOPIC
By Ronald Kotulak and Ronald Kotulak,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 4, 2004
What are people to make of studies suggesting that antidepressants may increase the risk of suicide in adolescents, that breast enhancement surgery may also make some women more prone to kill themselves, or that antibiotics may increase the chance of breast cancer? Well, scientists themselves don't know what to make of them. After all, these kinds of studies are intended to look for red flags when they find associations between drugs and other medical interventions and adverse side effects.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2001
The local branch of the NAACP endorsed yesterday a compromise plan to redraw Annapolis' eight voting districts, three days after persuading the city's redistricting committee to revise its original proposal, which the group had called unfair to blacks. The revised plan drafted Monday night by the city's committee would create three majority-black wards, one more than under its original plan, which proposed two majority-black wards and a ward in which various minorities together would constitute a majority.
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