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By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
General Physics Corp., on the heels of a merger with a former subsidiary, announced the resignation yesterday of its president and chief executive.Roger E. Klose's departure from the Columbia-based engineering and nuclear power services company comes less than a month after the completion of a merger with GPS Technologies Corp., a former subsidiary that splintered from General Physics in September 1991.Mr. Klose, who resigned his position of four years for "personal reasons," according to a company statement, will remain a senior consultant to the company through 1997.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2011
General Physics Corp. had already built a strong business training police and fire departments in the use of emergency equipment. But after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the doors of opportunity opened even wider. The attacks focused officials at all levels of government on homeland security, and federal money to support it become plentiful. Protecting against terrorist attacks became a high priority for municipalities and federal grants to support the effort became plentiful.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1995
General Physics Corp. plans to relocate and shrink its headquarters within Columbia by September, a shift the company expects will save $1 million annually.The nuclear and environmental engineering firm's new offices in the Columbia Overlook building will be roughly one-half as large as its current headquarters.General Physics recently eliminated jobs because of a reduction in its core nuclear energy business and the sale of some subsidiaries.The space reduction was also made possible by cuts in administrative staff after the absorption of GPS Technologies Inc., a subsidiary that was spun off in 1991 but reacquired in August 1994.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN REPORTER | April 22, 2008
Think technology business, and you'll likely imagine a company run by a 20-something or even younger upstart. At RWD Technologies Inc., a Baltimore consulting and training company, the founder turned 84 in March. But don't ask Robert W. Deutsch about his retirement plans. He doesn't have any. Deutsch is just as active in the company today as when he founded it 20 years ago. Deutsch, who gave up his chief executive duties four years ago but remains the board chairman, oversees the private company's research and product development efforts.
BUSINESS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
Two investors have filed a federal class-action suit against General Physics Corp. of Columbia, claiming the company concealed information about financial problems to boost its stock price.A company official denied the charges yesterday.The suit, filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, followed the company's announcement Thursday that second-quarter profits would be lower than forecast. Its stock price fell 36 percent the next day.In court papers, the investors charge that General Physics misled investors and artificially inflated its stock price with an announcement in March.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | July 7, 1994
General Physics Corp., a Columbia-based company that specializes in training workers at nuclear power plants, is seeking approval to purchase GPS Technologies Inc., a defense and utilities industry contractor also based in Columbia.The purchase offer, which includes $10 million in cash, stock and stock purchase options, is valued at $30 million to $40 million, depending on stock price fluctuations, company executives said.The sale must be approved by stockholders of the two publicly held companies.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1995
General Physics Corp., in an abrupt reversal of an earlier decision, acknowledged yesterday that it will maintain its existing headquarters rather than relocate to a smaller building within Columbia.As a result, the nuclear and environmental engineering firm will stay in a four-story building in the Manekin Corp.'s Gateway Crossing 95 business park. In keeping with its recent downsizing, however, General Physics will occupy less than half of the 79,000-square-foot building, constructed as its headquarters in 1987.
BUSINESS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
Two investors have filed a federal class-action suit against General Physics Corp. of Columbia, claiming the company concealed information about financial problems to boost its stock price.A company official denied the charges yesterday.The suit, filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, followed the company's announcement Thursday that second-quarter profits would be lower than forecast. Its stock price fell 36 percent the next day.In court papers, the investors charge that General Physics misled investors and artificially inflated its stock price with an announcement in March.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2004
A Maryland company that helps local governments prepare for terrorism is currently consumed with a much different problem: How to get rid of 25,000 truckloads of debris. General Physics Corp. of Elkridge was hired by Polk County in central Florida to manage the logistics for cleaning up the aftermath of two hurricanes in three weeks. The county, which expects to pay between $2 million and $3 million for the company's services, last saw a major hurricane in 1960. General Physics has 135 people in Florida - almost all of them temporary, local hires who were out of work from their regular jobs because of the storms.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | June 20, 1992
Columbia-based General Physics Corp. expects its second-quarter earnings to be "significantly lower" than expected because of delays in new contracts and continued high overhead costs.Analysts had been projecting earnings of 24 cents to 27 cents a share for the quarter.The announcement, made late Thursday, sent the company's stock into a tailspin yesterday. Shares of General Physics dropped nearly 36 percent to close at $5.875 on the New York Stock Exchange, down $3.25 for the day. The stock had closed Thursday down 12.5 cents at $9.125.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2004
A Maryland company that helps local governments prepare for terrorism is currently consumed with a much different problem: How to get rid of 25,000 truckloads of debris. General Physics Corp. of Elkridge was hired by Polk County in central Florida to manage the logistics for cleaning up the aftermath of two hurricanes in three weeks. The county, which expects to pay between $2 million and $3 million for the company's services, last saw a major hurricane in 1960. General Physics has 135 people in Florida - almost all of them temporary, local hires who were out of work from their regular jobs because of the storms.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2004
VALHALLA, N.Y. -- Scotty Hager delivers the bad news: 128 dead from a rare disease masquerading as the flu. Local hospitals overrun. Terrorism suspected. On the projection screen behind him, President Bush intones: "None of us will ever forget this day." None of it happened. The fire, police and health officials listening intently had brought Hager from Maryland to stage a terrorism scenario so they could be prepared for the real thing. For Westchester County, 20 miles north of Ground Zero in Lower Manhattan, terrorism response plans and exercises are deadly serious work.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1997
RWD Technologies Inc., a fast-growing Columbia company that has helped manufacturers from Chrysler to Anheuser-Busch harness technology and improve productivity, is close to selling 22 percent of itself to public investors.Founded and owned by Robert W. Deutsch, who also started Columbia's General Physics Corp. and took it public 15 years ago, RWD intends to sell 3 million shares for between $10 and $12 each. Ronald Holtz, RWD's chief financial officer, said the company's first stock offering would be made "in the very near future."
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1996
Fourteen months ago, the Manekin Corp. had won the battle but was losing the war with its General Physics Building in Columbia.Although the developer convinced General Physics Corp. to maintain its headquarters in a four-story project completed in 1987, keeping the nuclear and environmental engineering firm came at a price.In exchange for staying put, General Physics sliced its office need more than in half to help avert a corporate meltdown, suddenly leaving its landlord with 47,000 square feet of empty space.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1995
General Physics Corp., in an abrupt reversal of an earlier decision, acknowledged yesterday that it will maintain its existing headquarters rather than relocate to a smaller building within Columbia.As a result, the nuclear and environmental engineering firm will stay in a four-story building in the Manekin Corp.'s Gateway Crossing 95 business park. In keeping with its recent downsizing, however, General Physics will occupy less than half of the 79,000-square-foot building, constructed as its headquarters in 1987.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1995
General Physics Corp. plans to relocate and shrink its headquarters within Columbia by September, a shift the company expects will save $1 million annually.The nuclear and environmental engineering firm's new offices in the Columbia Overlook building will be roughly one-half as large as its current headquarters.General Physics recently eliminated jobs because of a reduction in its core nuclear energy business and the sale of some subsidiaries.The space reduction was also made possible by cuts in administrative staff after the absorption of GPS Technologies Inc., a subsidiary that was spun off in 1991 but reacquired in August 1994.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
Three Columbia-based companies and a Swedish firm are joining forces to create an international computer simulation company based in Columbia.Simulation, Systems and Services Technologies Co., known as S3, agreed Friday to merge with EuroSim AB of Sweden and two Columbia-based units of National Patent Development Corp. to form a new company to be known as Global Simulation and Engineering Systems Inc. (GSE).The new company, which will be housed in S3's Columbia headquarters, will be headed by S3 Chief Executive William E. Kuhlmann, a former General Physics Corp.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1993
Travelers unloads some assetsAs part of its attempt to unload $1 billion in underperforming assets by year's end, the Travelers Corp. yesterday sold a large portion of its portfolio of foreclosed real estate and bad commercial loans for $634 million.The insurance company sold the properties and loans to Quantum Realty Fund of the Netherlands Antilles. The sale included 12 commercial mortgage loans and 35 foreclosed properties around the country, most of them office buildings.Sales by wholesalers dip againSales by wholesalers slipped for a second straight month in July, the Commerce Department said yesterday, while stocks of unsold goods shrank for a second consecutive month.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
General Physics Corp., on the heels of a merger with a former subsidiary, announced the resignation yesterday of its president and chief executive.Roger E. Klose's departure from the Columbia-based engineering and nuclear power services company comes less than a month after the completion of a merger with GPS Technologies Corp., a former subsidiary that splintered from General Physics in September 1991.Mr. Klose, who resigned his position of four years for "personal reasons," according to a company statement, will remain a senior consultant to the company through 1997.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | July 7, 1994
General Physics Corp., a Columbia-based company that specializes in training workers at nuclear power plants, is seeking approval to purchase GPS Technologies Inc., a defense and utilities industry contractor also based in Columbia.The purchase offer, which includes $10 million in cash, stock and stock purchase options, is valued at $30 million to $40 million, depending on stock price fluctuations, company executives said.The sale must be approved by stockholders of the two publicly held companies.
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