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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | December 8, 1992
Q: My son had a physical for high school basketball. They checked his urine and found a little bit of protein. Should we worry?A: Chances are there is nothing wrong with your son's health, but we would need some additional information to reassure you completely.Sometimes, protein in the urine can be a sign of kidney problems. Some teen-agers, however, will have a bit of protein in the urine after exercising. Even in the absence of exercise, it is not unusual for otherwise healthy adolescents to have a small amount of protein in their urine; the cause of this is unknown.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 1997
Every year about this time I begin to wonder about the same thing. When is it safe for children to go outside barefoot? My mother used to say the last day of school.Medical science may not help you much with this one!When the ground is frozen, walking on it for extended periods of time can cause frostbite. That is bad.Once the weather is past that point, however, bare feet are not much to worry about medically in temperate climates where earthborn human parasites are rare.Cold feet can cause discomfort, but they can't cause pneumonia, ear infections or colds.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | August 13, 1991
Q. My sons are 8 and 10 and seem excessively frightened of insects.A. Most children have had the unpleasant experience of being stung. Insects can be unsettling, especially at night when children tend to be worried and frightened by the dark.Your children have reached an age when they may be somewhat skeptical of your reassurances and need to find things out for themselves. Study insects with your children. Good books at their reading levels are available. Science centers and museums of natural history usually have excellent displays with explanations.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 1995
My grandchildren, ages 8 and 10, stayed with me last week. I wanted to take them to a movie. They begged to see an action movie I thought would be too violent. They pouted and said their parents would let them go. In fact, they named movies they had seen that surprised me. What should a grandmother do in this situation? I have made it a rule not to interfere with how my son raises his children.With ready access to movies on videotape, it has become harder to monitor what even young children see, but we think you should stick to your standards.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | September 7, 1993
Q: We have two dogs. Our 6-month-old just loves them. He is always talking to them, leaning forward and trying to touch them. Should we let him? We are anxious for them to learn to co-exist as soon as possible.A: Dog bites can be dreadful. We have seen a number of children whose faces have been permanently disfigured or who have had to undergo plastic surgery procedures because of dog bites.We believe concern for the child should always be higher than concern for dogs. So the first question we would ask is: Have your dogs ever bitten anyone?
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | August 24, 1993
Q: I just read that infant walkers are dangerous. My 5-month-old just loves his. Do I have to get rid of it? Can I let him use it if I watch him every minute?A: Many babies have been seriously injured while riding in walkers. Some have died. Most serious injuries occur when the baby rides the walker down the stairs. We think this is too big a chance to take with something as precious as your baby.A walker provides no developmental advantage for your baby, though we can well imagine what you mean when you say he loves it. Of course he gets joy out of exploring his world.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | September 28, 1993
Q: My 10-year-old daughter has begun to complain about her bedtime, saying that she isn't sleepy. I insist that she go to bed at 8 on a school night like she always has. She says that all her friends get to stay up later and she should get to, too. What is TTC the right bedtime for a 10-year-old?A: Neither your daughter's age nor what her friends do can tell you absolutely when she should go to bed. Most children need less sleep as they get older, and we think 8 o'clock sounds early for your daughter.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | August 31, 1993
Our 10-year-old son likes to get close to the TV when he watches it. Will it ruin his eyesight if he watches a lot of TV that close to the set?We don't recommend that children watch a lot of TV from any distance.Television substitutes too easily for other activities. However, we do not believe that watching TV, even from close range, will ruin children's eyes.On the other hand, we wonder if your child already has an eye problem. Perhaps he doesn't see well from a distance and that's why he prefers to be so close to the TV. We suggest you get his eyes tested.
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By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | February 22, 1994
Q: A friend came to see our 4-month-old for the first time and brought an unusual gift -- a pretty little gold ring. Is is all right for her to wear it?We have seen several babies wearing rings recently, but we worry about them.Babies' hands grow quickly. A ring that just fits now will soon be too tight.A tight ring might restrict growth or become difficult to remove as the finger grows. On the other hand, if a ring is loose, it might slip off.That could be quite dangerous because it might be swallowed.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 1997
Every year about this time I begin to wonder about the same thing. When is it safe for children to go outside barefoot? My mother used to say the last day of school.Medical science may not help you much with this one!When the ground is frozen, walking on it for extended periods of time can cause frostbite. That is bad.Once the weather is past that point, however, bare feet are not much to worry about medically in temperate climates where earthborn human parasites are rare.Cold feet can cause discomfort, but they can't cause pneumonia, ear infections or colds.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | November 15, 1994
Q: I feel silly even writing about this, but here's my problem. My 4-year-old son doesn't want to wear pajamas, even in the winter. He wants to go to bed naked. I think he got the idea from his father. I don't know what to do about it!A: You haven't said why you think your son should wear pajamas! We are guessing your reasons have more to do with modesty than with health. We know of no health problems that result from being pajamaless. Bed covers are sufficient for warmth.We recommend that you let your son sleep naked in his room at home if that's what he wants.
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By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | March 1, 1994
Q: My son has had three ear infections. Do you think I caused jTC them by getting water in his ears when I washed his hair?He really hates to get his hair washed and fights me when I do it even though he's only 2.A: Bathwater does not cause ear infections. Ear infections happen in a part of the ear canal called the middle ear.The eardrum stretches across the canal, preventing water from reaching the middle ear.Ear infections are caused by bacterial, and possibly viral germs.These do not get into the middle ear through the ear canal.
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By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | February 22, 1994
Q: A friend came to see our 4-month-old for the first time and brought an unusual gift -- a pretty little gold ring. Is is all right for her to wear it?We have seen several babies wearing rings recently, but we worry about them.Babies' hands grow quickly. A ring that just fits now will soon be too tight.A tight ring might restrict growth or become difficult to remove as the finger grows. On the other hand, if a ring is loose, it might slip off.That could be quite dangerous because it might be swallowed.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | September 28, 1993
Q: My 10-year-old daughter has begun to complain about her bedtime, saying that she isn't sleepy. I insist that she go to bed at 8 on a school night like she always has. She says that all her friends get to stay up later and she should get to, too. What is TTC the right bedtime for a 10-year-old?A: Neither your daughter's age nor what her friends do can tell you absolutely when she should go to bed. Most children need less sleep as they get older, and we think 8 o'clock sounds early for your daughter.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | September 7, 1993
Q: We have two dogs. Our 6-month-old just loves them. He is always talking to them, leaning forward and trying to touch them. Should we let him? We are anxious for them to learn to co-exist as soon as possible.A: Dog bites can be dreadful. We have seen a number of children whose faces have been permanently disfigured or who have had to undergo plastic surgery procedures because of dog bites.We believe concern for the child should always be higher than concern for dogs. So the first question we would ask is: Have your dogs ever bitten anyone?
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | August 31, 1993
Our 10-year-old son likes to get close to the TV when he watches it. Will it ruin his eyesight if he watches a lot of TV that close to the set?We don't recommend that children watch a lot of TV from any distance.Television substitutes too easily for other activities. However, we do not believe that watching TV, even from close range, will ruin children's eyes.On the other hand, we wonder if your child already has an eye problem. Perhaps he doesn't see well from a distance and that's why he prefers to be so close to the TV. We suggest you get his eyes tested.
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By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | March 1, 1994
Q: My son has had three ear infections. Do you think I caused jTC them by getting water in his ears when I washed his hair?He really hates to get his hair washed and fights me when I do it even though he's only 2.A: Bathwater does not cause ear infections. Ear infections happen in a part of the ear canal called the middle ear.The eardrum stretches across the canal, preventing water from reaching the middle ear.Ear infections are caused by bacterial, and possibly viral germs.These do not get into the middle ear through the ear canal.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | November 15, 1994
Q: I feel silly even writing about this, but here's my problem. My 4-year-old son doesn't want to wear pajamas, even in the winter. He wants to go to bed naked. I think he got the idea from his father. I don't know what to do about it!A: You haven't said why you think your son should wear pajamas! We are guessing your reasons have more to do with modesty than with health. We know of no health problems that result from being pajamaless. Bed covers are sufficient for warmth.We recommend that you let your son sleep naked in his room at home if that's what he wants.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | August 24, 1993
Q: I just read that infant walkers are dangerous. My 5-month-old just loves his. Do I have to get rid of it? Can I let him use it if I watch him every minute?A: Many babies have been seriously injured while riding in walkers. Some have died. Most serious injuries occur when the baby rides the walker down the stairs. We think this is too big a chance to take with something as precious as your baby.A walker provides no developmental advantage for your baby, though we can well imagine what you mean when you say he loves it. Of course he gets joy out of exploring his world.
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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 3, 1993
Q: My husband and I will both be working full-time days soon. We think we might put our 2-year-old daughter in nursery school. We have found one we really like. Will five days of nursery school be too much for her? Should we take her to a sitter part of the time?A: Your question is difficult to answer without knowing more about your daughter and what she is accustomed to, but your dilemma is a familiar one. Many young children must be cared for out of their own homes because their parents work.
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