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By Los Angeles Times | September 27, 1991
MIAMI -- Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega demanded a payoff of at least $100,000 for every planeload of Colombian cocaine passing through Panama, saying that it would have been "crazy" for him to take less, the deposed leader's former personal pilot testified yesterday.Floyd Carlton Caceres, who said he piloted four drug flights into Panama with General Noriega's approval, told a federal court jury he delivered envelopes containing $600,000 to the military leader in 1982 and 1983, giving them to an intermediary at General Noriega's instructions.
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NEWS
June 13, 1992
At one level, Panama has recovered nicely since the United States' invasion of December 1989. The economy is growing rapidly. Bank deposits are rising. Some dent has been made in the debt inherited from the dictatorship of Manuel Noriega, so that the country is once again eligible for IMF credit. New high-rises alter the Panama City skyline. The Panama Canal is efficiently managed under the 1977 treaties; 1991 saw the second-highest tonnage in its history.But at another level, where most of the 2.5 million Panamanians live, the little country is a mess.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 2, 1991
MIAMI -- The lawyer defending Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega hammered away at the prosecution's star witness for the second consecutive day yesterday, accusing him of "shaking down" the cocaine-trafficking ring based in Medellin, Colombia, for $500,000 in bribes by "trading on the general's name."Chief defense counsel Frank Rubino also coaxed from Floyd Carlton Caceres, General Noriega's former personal pilot, an admission that the general "did not know the details" of four drug flights from Colombia to Panama that Mr. Carlton had previously testified to having flown.
NEWS
By ASSOCIASTED PRESS | February 7, 1992
MIAMI -- Federal prosecutors fought yesterday to keep jurors from hearing about confidential government reports favorable to Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega during the testimony of a top U.S. drug agent.James Bramble, former head of the Drug Enforcement Administration office in Panama, testified for the defense that the former Panamanian leader's police arrested the cousin of the Ochoa brothers who founded the Medellin drug cartel.Prosecutors had said Marta Saldarriaga Ochoa was the Miami coordinator of a drug-trafficking and money-laundering operation run by the cartel through Panama under General Noriega's protection.
NEWS
By Mary T. Schmich and Mary T. Schmich,Chicago Tribune | September 3, 1991
Manuel Antonio Noriega has spent most of the past year and eight months in what is called the "Dictator's Suite" in the Metropolitan Correctional Center near Miami.He lives alone in a three-room cell equipped with a paper shredder, a copying machine, a stationary bicycle, an alarm-equipped file filled with classified documents, a toilet, a television set, a bunk and a shelf for a few books, among them a Spanish-language Bible.In his long, solitary wait for a trial, Panama's deposed dictator, who reportedly sought spiritual succor in several religions, including Buddhism, before his imprisonment, reputedly has become a born-again Christian.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 17, 1990
PANAMA CITY, Panama -- Capt. Asuncion Gaitan, the right-hand man to deposed Panamanian leader Manuel Antonio Noriega, was reported missing yesterday from the Vatican Embassy here, where he had been granted asylum in December.The captain, among the most wanted men from the Noriega regime, became the object of a massive manhunt last night that included U.S. helicopters. Beefed-up security patrols were assigned to watch all airports and border crossings.How Captain Gaitan left the embassy was unknown.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 29, 1991
MIAMI -- A former Panamanian ambassador passed $10 million in bribes to Manuel Antonio Noriega in return for permission to fly nearly 20 tons of cocaine into the United States, a federal prosecutor said yesterday.The disclosure came in U.S. District Court as Ricardo Bilonick, 44, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiring with the deposed Panamanian leader to smuggle cocaine through their country in the mid-1980s.Bilonick, a former diplomat and businessman who holds a law degree from Tulane University, is said to be one of the prosecution's most important witnesses against General Noriega.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 9, 1990
WASHINGTON -- A new dispute erupted yesterday in the case of deposed Panamanian dictator Manuel Antonio Noriega with the disclosure that the government had recorded some of General Noriega's phone calls from jail to his defense attorneys.An outraged Frank A. Rubino, the chief defense lawyer, said that he would seek dismissal of federal drug-trafficking charges on grounds that confidential attorney-client conversations had been breached.But a prosecutor, Myles Malman, told U.S. District Judge William M. Hoeveler in Miami that federal lawyers had not listened to any of the tapes and that the FBI was investigating to determine how copies were obtained and broadcast by Cable News Network.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 17, 1990
MIAMI -- Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega, standing erect in his full military uniform, made a dramatic plea for fairness yesterday, telling a federal court that the U.S. government "has done as much as possible to deprive me of a fair trial."The deposed Panamanian dictator told U.S. District Judge William M. Hoeveler that "the government of the United States does not wish that I defend myself" as preparations bogged down for his drug-trafficking trial.Uttering his first words in public since being forcibly brought to the United States in January at the conclusion of the U.S. invasion of Panama, General Noriega protested that he was being prevented from retaining his private lawyers of choice because his overseas bank accounts had been frozen by federal officials.
NEWS
By David Lyons and David Lyons,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 17, 1991
MIAMI -- Federal prosecutors raised the curtain yesterday on the government's complex drug case against Manuel Antonio Noriega, telling jurors that the deposed Panamanian leader was a "crooked cop" who remained behind the scenes while underlings helped make him rich from the drug trade."
NEWS
By KENNETH E. SHARPE | December 15, 1991
Two years ago this week, a U.S. swat team of 27,000 troops invaded Panama, and arrested the chief drug lord, general and ruler, Manuel Noriega. U.S. Ambassador to Panama Deane Hinton called it "the biggest drug bust in history." The outcome of the current Noriega trial in Florida is still uncertain, but the evidence has already shown why the U.S. drug war in Latin America is condemned to failure.What has clearly emerged from the trial is how Panama's deposed leader and his military made a fortune by fighting on both sides in the drug war.General Noriega has a stack of letters from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration praising his cooperation: he helped the DEA make drug busts, confiscated a bank owned by a drug cartel and smashed a major cocaine lab. The United States was grateful for his help in spying on Cuba and aiding Nicaragua's contra exiles, and he received pay from the CIA (the U.S. government maintains it paid its man in Panama $320,000, while he claims $10 million)
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | October 12, 1991
MIAMI -- Cuban President Fidel Castro may be barred by legal technicalities from making a videotaped appearance as a witness in the trial of Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega.Potential legal problems associated with Mr. Castro's possible testimony in the trial were raised by U.S. District Judge William Hoeveler during a private conference in the courtroom with prosecutors and defense attorneys. It was conducted out of earshot of the jury and members of the public.The bench conference occurred in late September, and transcripts of the discussion were released yesterday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 2, 1991
MIAMI -- The lawyer defending Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega hammered away at the prosecution's star witness for the second consecutive day yesterday, accusing him of "shaking down" the cocaine-trafficking ring based in Medellin, Colombia, for $500,000 in bribes by "trading on the general's name."Chief defense counsel Frank Rubino also coaxed from Floyd Carlton Caceres, General Noriega's former personal pilot, an admission that the general "did not know the details" of four drug flights from Colombia to Panama that Mr. Carlton had previously testified to having flown.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 27, 1991
MIAMI -- Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega demanded a payoff of at least $100,000 for every planeload of Colombian cocaine passing through Panama, saying that it would have been "crazy" for him to take less, the deposed leader's former personal pilot testified yesterday.Floyd Carlton Caceres, who said he piloted four drug flights into Panama with General Noriega's approval, told a federal court jury he delivered envelopes containing $600,000 to the military leader in 1982 and 1983, giving them to an intermediary at General Noriega's instructions.
NEWS
By David Lyons and David Lyons,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 17, 1991
MIAMI -- Federal prosecutors raised the curtain yesterday on the government's complex drug case against Manuel Antonio Noriega, telling jurors that the deposed Panamanian leader was a "crooked cop" who remained behind the scenes while underlings helped make him rich from the drug trade."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 6, 1991
MIAMI-- After months of delays and legal melodrama, jury selection began yesterday in the trial of deposed Panamanian dictator Manuel Antonio Noriega -- an unprecedented proceeding expected to explore the methods and morality of U.S. intelligence operations abroad.The drug-trafficking trial represents the first time a foreign leader has been seized by invading U.S. forces and tried as a criminal in civilian court.General Noriega is facing 10 separate charges of conspiracy, racketeering and international drug-trafficking based on allegations that he turned his country into a haven for Colombian cocaine dealers to smuggle their drugs into the United States.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 9, 1990
PANAMA CITY, Panama -- The U.S.-backed Panamanian defense chief has been fired because he acquiesced in or backed a series of small-bomb attacks against senior government officials, according to well-placed sources here.The attacks were aimed at showing the administration of President Guillermo Endara that the country needs a regular military force capable of dealing with such bombings, not just a police force as advocated by the government.According to these sources, Lt. Col. Eduardo Herrera Hassan was fired Aug. 22 after a police investigation uncovered his role.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | October 12, 1991
MIAMI -- Cuban President Fidel Castro may be barred by legal technicalities from making a videotaped appearance as a witness in the trial of Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega.Potential legal problems associated with Mr. Castro's possible testimony in the trial were raised by U.S. District Judge William Hoeveler during a private conference in the courtroom with prosecutors and defense attorneys. It was conducted out of earshot of the jury and members of the public.The bench conference occurred in late September, and transcripts of the discussion were released yesterday.
NEWS
September 5, 1991
Says Judge William Hoeveler, who will preside over the trial of deposed Panamanian strongman Manuel Noriega: "As far as I'm concerned, the trial will be conducted just like any other trial."Oh, sure, just another trial, except for the fact that the defendant was head of a sovereign nation, that he surrendered to law enforcement authorities only after his country was invaded by U.S. troops, that he was secretly on the U.S. payroll for years, that Fidel Castro may be a witness, that an informant has received $510,000 from the United States since agreeing to testify against the general and that the defense strategy is to subpoena every top secret U.S. document extant dealing with Latin America while claiming that the defendant was arrested and charged only because he wouldn't help overthrow the Sandinistas in Nicaragua.
NEWS
By Mary T. Schmich and Mary T. Schmich,Chicago Tribune | September 3, 1991
Manuel Antonio Noriega has spent most of the past year and eight months in what is called the "Dictator's Suite" in the Metropolitan Correctional Center near Miami.He lives alone in a three-room cell equipped with a paper shredder, a copying machine, a stationary bicycle, an alarm-equipped file filled with classified documents, a toilet, a television set, a bunk and a shelf for a few books, among them a Spanish-language Bible.In his long, solitary wait for a trial, Panama's deposed dictator, who reportedly sought spiritual succor in several religions, including Buddhism, before his imprisonment, reputedly has become a born-again Christian.
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