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NEWS
July 31, 1994
The big three U.S. automakers are making much more than record profits these days. In one of the most remarkable turnarounds in the annals of heavy industry, the lords of Detroit have recreated themselves as the manufacturing force they had been for half a century but seemed fated never to be again. The record quarterly earnings General Motors, Ford and Chrysler reported, welcome to management and stockholders, are even better news for the U.S. economy.Just 15 years ago, Chrysler was begging for a federal handout to survive and GM was a doddering behemoth tripping over its own limbs.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
About one in five cars on American roadways connects to outside parties via cellular telephone networks, transmitting data on drivers' speeding and braking habits, their location, and their vehicle's health and performance. By 2025, AAA predicts, all new cars will. Computers on board most vehicles on the road already collect and monitor such data, which can be downloaded at dealerships for repair purposes and shared with manufacturers, who say it's used to make cars safer and more reliable.
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NEWS
September 22, 2002
John Walter Raymond, a retired General Motors assemblyman, died Tuesday at Avalon Manor Nursing Home in Hagerstown from complications of colon cancer. He was 80 and lived in Essex. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Raymond grew up in the Pimlico area. He left school after the eighth grade, and worked as a deliveryman and did other odd jobs. In 1942, he enlisted in the Army. Mr. Raymond was sent to Europe and fought in the Battle of the Bulge. He earned the Bronze Star after a raid on an enemy artillery position during the battle, his family said.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 11, 2014
General Motors has fired 15 employees after an internal investigation into the company's handling of defective ignition switches that led to at least 13 fatalities. But the only way to stop lawbreaking at GM or any other big corporation is to prosecute the people who break the law. And so far, no one at GM has been prosecuted. "What GM did was break the law. ... They failed to meet their public safety obligations," scolded Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx after imposing the largest possible penalty on the giant automaker.
NEWS
March 22, 2003
Rose Rebsamen, a retired personnel secretary who worked at the General Motors Fisher Body Division on Broening Highway, died Tuesday after an apparent stroke at a niece's home in Towson. She was 87. She was born Rose Mitchell in Flushing, Ohio, and attended public schools in Lafferty and Steubenville, Ohio, and Ambridge, Pa. In the early 1940s, she moved to Baltimore and joined GM's personnel department as a secretary. In 1948, she married William Rebsamen, who died in 1993. Mrs. Rebsamen established a women's section of the U.N. Club Auxiliary, an Italian-American fraternal organization.
NEWS
August 8, 2003
Milton Ay Yuhn, retired General Motors Corp. supervisor, died Monday while being taken from a hospital to a nursing home after suffering a fall nearly a month ago. The Parkville resident was 92. Born in Baltimore and raised on Cliftmont Avenue, he attended city public schools until the seventh grade. Mr. Yuhn told family members he left the city at age 16 and traveled across the country by jumping on railroad boxcars. He lived in California for several years before returning home and working in a relative's gas station.
NEWS
April 5, 2003
Raymond Powell, a retired General Motors Corp. assembly-line worker and a longtime volunteer for the homeless, died of lung cancer Wednesday at Harbor Hospital. The Glen Burnie resident was 74. Born in Collins, Ga., Mr. Powell was one of 11 children. When he was 18, he moved to Baltimore and worked as a construction worker for Welsh Construction. He was later promoted to supervisor. During the Korean War, he served from 1950 to 1951 in the Army with the 62nd Engineering Construction Battalion and was discharged with the rank of staff sergeant.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | December 29, 2008
James S. Brennan, a retired supervisor for General Motors who also served in the Air Force during the Korean War, died Dec. 21 in his Severna Park home after a lengthy battle with lung cancer. He was 75. Mr. Brennan was born in Baltimore. He graduated from City College in 1951 and attended the University of Maryland, College Park. He enlisted in the Air Force and fought as an airman first class in the Korean War. He then returned to Maryland, where he worked as a supervisor for General Motors for more than 20 years.
NEWS
June 19, 2005
Calvert Thomas, a descendant of Maryland's founding family who became a leading attorney for the General Motors Corp., died Friday at Hartford Hospital in Connecticut. He was 88 and had suffered from prostate cancer. He was born and raised in Baltimore, where he competed in wrestling and lacrosse at the YMCA and graduated from Polytechnic Institute. Mr. Thomas received his bachelor's degree from Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Va., where he became a two-time conference wrestling champion.
NEWS
March 10, 2003
Joseph D'Ascenzo, a retired electrician and longtime Highlandtown resident, died Thursday of heart failure in Morehead City, N.C. He was 94 and lived in Swansboro, N.C., for the past 18 years. Born in New York City, Mr. D'Ascenzo moved to Potomac Street in Highlandtown when he was age 5. He attended St. Mary's Industrial School. During World War I, he earned money delivering military mail for troops traveling through Baltimore. As a young man, he worked several jobs, including a nine-month stint as a Hoover Dam construction worker, a coal miner in West Virginia and an amateur boxer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Franklin S. Dail Sr., a retired General Motors executive who enjoyed tennis and running, died Thursday of pneumonia at University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 82. The son of Franklin Dail, a grocery store owner, and Anna Dail, a homemaker, Franklin Shelmon Dail Sr. was born and raised at a home on Dundalk Avenue. After graduating from Dundalk High School in 1950, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1953 in business management from the University of Baltimore, where he earned a law degree in 1961.
NEWS
February 11, 2014
After a 47-year career first with Bethlehem Steel and then with General Motors and not getting raises for years when the companies where losing money, I do not understand how civil service employees can spend my tax dollars and give raises within such a short time frame to a person who has not done the job that they where hired to do ("Former Md. health exchange director given 5 wage increases," Feb. 7). This is just another case of Maryland elected officials' cronyism that they would hire Rebecca Pearce to do a job that she was not qualified to do. J. Heming, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
Dundalk's high school deteriorated during the past two decades just as the community's once-bustling steel mill declined. From the school's top floor, you could see the Key Bridge and the detritus of a shuttered industrial past. Inside, the school mirrored the dilapidation. The windows had clouded over, no air conditioning meant classroom temperatures would soar, and the roof leaked so badly that large garbage cans were strategically placed during storms to catch water dripping through the ceiling.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
State energy officials and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will unveil a pair of electric vehicle charging stations outside City Hall on Friday, the first on a city public street, officials said. The stations were installed at the corner of Lexington and Gay streets on the War Memorial Plaza. A ceremony to open the stations for use will take place at 11 a.m. General Motors is providing a Chevy Spark vehicle to demonstrate the charging. The stations aren't the first ones available to the public in the city.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
General Motors officially launched its new electric motor in White Marsh Tuesday, a milestone in U.S. manufacturing - and a key part of the company's bet that the electric-vehicle market is poised to grow. With production under way at the Baltimore County "eMotor" plant, GM says, the company is the first automaker to manufacture electric-drive motors domestically. The operation is small for now: About 20 employees make motors for the plug-in electric Chevrolet Spark EV, side by side with 27 robots.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 16, 2013
Since the Motown sound went silent -- except on oldies stations -- and General Motors and Chrysler (but not Ford) required life support from Washington, there has been little to recommend Detroit, Mich., to visitors, much less its residents. The recent conviction of Kwame Kilpatrick, the former mayor of Detroit, on multiple charges, including racketeering, fraud and extortion, adds another insult to the city's injury, increasing its misery. During the mid-20th century, Detroit was a vibrant city with a population of almost 2 million.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | April 2, 1991
General Motors launched Saturn into orbit last October, but the idea for creating the new car company began in a planning meeting in 1982.At that time, General Motors was relying on Japan and South Korea to set the pace for new-car design. The company had even formed a division called Geo to sell Japanese cars in its Chevrolet stores. But General Motors decided to go a step further in meeting the imports.Saturn managers were given a blank sheet to design not only a new car, but a new way of doing business.
NEWS
December 26, 2006
Henry O. Holt Jr., a retired mechanical engineer for General Motors, died of a blood disease Dec. 19 at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 89. Mr. Holt, the son of a factory worker for Bethlehem Steel, was born in West Virginia and raised in Baltimore. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1935, he worked for Bethlehem Steel before enrolling at General Motors Institute in Flint, Mich., the first in his family to go to college. While in Flint, Mr. Holt met his future wife, Genevieve A. Waghorne.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
After a 45-year career in the private sector, first with Bethlehem Steel, then with Harley Davidson Motor Company and ending with General Motors, I lost wages, medical benefits and pensions when these companies were not making profits. Federal workers have not made any sacrifices that compare to losses in the private sector jobs ("Federal workers rally, underscore their sacrifices," Dec. 6). Most of them retire with 85 percent of their salary and medical benefits that they never paid into.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, Lorraine Mirabella and Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
As much of the Baltimore region shut down, some businesses made sure they could stay open - come hurricane and high water. The Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel brought in sandbags, ordered $30,000 in extra food and arranged for employees to stay overnight for the duration of the storm. The owner of Kooper's Tavern and two other Fells Point bars prepared to put his workers up Monday and Tuesday nights in his bed-and-breakfast, conveniently emptied by cancellations. Safeway rearranged shifts as it trucked in ice and extra bottled water to its grocery stores.
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