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By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2006
Shares of Martek Biosciences Corp. jumped as much as 14 percent yesterday after the Columbia biotech company said it landed a deal for its nutritional supplements to be used by General Mills. The cereal giant is expected to launch a food item using Martek's product next year, Martek said in a news release. Martek manufactures DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish and some plants. Its product, which is derived from algae, is in more than two-thirds of the world's baby formula. Martek announced a similar deal last year with Kellogg Co., the country's No. 1 cereal maker.
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SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
I'm old enough to remember that it was a big deal when athletes were chosen to grace the front of a Wheaties box, yet I've never eaten a flake of it. General Mills would like to change that. The company has unveiled a promotion that, for the first time in the 90-year history of Wheaties, will allow the public to choose who's going on the iconic orange carton. The selection of athletes and the methodology show how General Mills is skewing younger with this promotion, the Wheaties Next Challenge . Lacrosse, the fastest-growing sport at the college and high school levels, gets a nod -- Rob Pannell, a former Cornell All-American and now a star with Major League Lacrosse's New York Lizards, is one of the five athletes up for the vote.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 1, 1999
MINNEAPOLIS -- General Mills Inc., the maker of Cheerios and Wheaties, passed Kellogg Co. for the first time as the largest U.S. cereal maker based on revenue.General Mills held 32.5 percent of the U.S. market based on dollars spent for the 12-week period that ended Dec. 6, according to Goldman, Sachs & Co. analyst Nomi Ghez, citing sales data collected by Information Resources Inc. That beats the 31.6 percent share notched by Kellogg.General Mills is succeeding by developing variations of its best-known brands such as Chex and new products including Cinnamon Toast Crunch that aren't readily copied by makers of discount and generic cereals.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
"Extract" is an exuberant original. This daft farce about a man who has founded and run a successful flavor extract company and lost the sexual attention of his wife is a workplace film like no other and one of the best comedies of the year. The film has sharper testicle jokes than all of the Judd Apatow gang's recent farces put together, a poolside seduction that's organic and uproarious, and a streak of stoner-slacker humor that's like repeated hits from a bong that's actually good for you. If those accolades have a primal ring to them, it's because writer-director Mike Judge, who a decade ago made the ultimate cubicle movie, "Office Space," brings the brains of a satirical biologist to his view of life on a bottling line and in all the office nooks and crannies - and trailer parks and upscale suburbs - surrounding it. If the movie doesn't surge with unabated potency like classic screwball comedy, it's got its own erratic snap, crackle and pop. And the ensemble (including Jason Bateman as company owner Joel Reynold and Kristen Wiig as his wife, Suzie)
FEATURES
By Harry Berkowitz and Harry Berkowitz,Newsday | April 20, 1994
Are consumers fed up with stratospheric cereal prices? Or have they become hopelessly addicted to cents-off cereal coupons and half-price sales?General Mills and the rest of the $8 billion U.S. cereal industry are about to find out.The answers could affect the level of profits for the food industry's most profitable major category -- and could alter the way America shops for its flakes, loops and brans.Starting this month, General Mills, the second-biggest cereal maker, is cutting prices on eight of its most popular brands -- including Cheerios, Wheaties, Total and Lucky Charms -- by 30 cents to 70 cents a box. At the same time, it is cutting back sharply on discount coupons and eliminating buy-one-get-one-free sales.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | January 14, 2007
How does the future look for my shares of General Mills Inc.? It has so many popular brands I would think it would do even better than it has. - R.L., via the Internet As one of North America's largest packaged-food companies, it is indeed a company of champions: Wheaties, Cheerios, Betty Crocker, Pillsbury, Gold Medal, Hamburger Helper, Progresso and Yoplait. It is constantly introducing products, benefiting lately from new Fruity Cheerios and Caribou Coffee granola bars. Eighty new products will be launched in its current fiscal year, among them low-sugar Disney-branded cereals and Nature Valley cereals.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 1, 1999
MINNEAPOLIS -- General Mills Inc., the maker of Cheerios and Wheaties, passed Kellogg Co. for the first time as the largest U.S. cereal maker based on revenue.General Mills held 32.5 percent of the U.S. market based on dollars spent for the 12-week period that ended Dec. 6, according to Goldman, Sachs & Co. analyst Nomi Ghez, citing sales data collected by Information Resources Inc. That beats the 31.6 percent share notched by Kellogg.General Mills is succeeding by developing variations of its best-known brands such as Chex and new products including Cinnamon Toast Crunch that aren't readily copied by makers of discount and generic cereals.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 3, 1997
MINNEAPOLIS -- General Mills Inc. raised the price of its breakfast cereals an average of 2.6 percent yesterday, saying the company needs to adjust for inflation and possibly signaling the end of a costly price war.General Mills, maker of Cheerios, Wheaties, Trix and other popular cereals, has seen its costs rise "on everything across the board," from wages to material costs, spokesman David Dix said. The price increase is effective immediately.Food companies, reacting to consumer complaints, started to slash prices on breakfast cereals more than a year ago. Cereal company earnings have since been squeezed, with General Mills last week reporting a 12 percent decline in fiscal fourth-quarter earnings, more than expected.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 18, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - General Mills Inc., the maker of Cheerios and Wheaties cereals, said yesterday that its fiscal first-quarter profit rose 18 percent as the company sold more yogurt and snacks and reduced interest and other expenses. Net income for the quarter that ended Aug. 26 rose to $188 million, or 64 cents a share, from $158.9 million, or 55 cents, a year earlier. Revenue rose 5.7 percent, to $1.77 billion from $1.67 billion, the company said. Interest expense dropped 11 percent in the quarter as interest rates fell, Chief Financial Officer James Lawrence said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | December 27, 1996
WASHINGTON -- General Mills Inc.'s purchase of Chex cereal brands from Ralcorp Holdings Inc. got clearance yesterday from U.S. antitrust authorities, who moved to promote price competition for Chex, the key ingredient in a popular snack.General Mills, America's second-largest cereal maker, agreed to drop noncompete restrictions on the sale of private-label versions of Chex as a condition of Federal Trade Commission antitrust approval for its $570 million purchase of Chex and other products from Ralcorp.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | May 11, 2009
ROBERT B. CHOATE JR., 84 Led fight for cereal nutrition labels Robert B. Choate Jr., a self-styled "citizen lobbyist" who in the 1960s and 1970s played a vital role in exposing malnutrition in America and was best remembered for embarrassing cereal companies into providing nutritional labels on their boxes, died May 3 at a retirement community in Lemon Grove, Calif. He had a medical condition that prevented him from swallowing. Mr. Choate was a civil engineer before reinventing himself in the late 1950s as a philanthropist, and consumer advocate.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | January 14, 2007
How does the future look for my shares of General Mills Inc.? It has so many popular brands I would think it would do even better than it has. - R.L., via the Internet As one of North America's largest packaged-food companies, it is indeed a company of champions: Wheaties, Cheerios, Betty Crocker, Pillsbury, Gold Medal, Hamburger Helper, Progresso and Yoplait. It is constantly introducing products, benefiting lately from new Fruity Cheerios and Caribou Coffee granola bars. Eighty new products will be launched in its current fiscal year, among them low-sugar Disney-branded cereals and Nature Valley cereals.
BUSINESS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2006
Shares of Martek Biosciences Corp. jumped as much as 14 percent yesterday after the Columbia biotech company said it landed a deal for its nutritional supplements to be used by General Mills. The cereal giant is expected to launch a food item using Martek's product next year, Martek said in a news release. Martek manufactures DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish and some plants. Its product, which is derived from algae, is in more than two-thirds of the world's baby formula. Martek announced a similar deal last year with Kellogg Co., the country's No. 1 cereal maker.
FEATURES
By ROHINA PHADNIS | March 11, 2006
What it is -- A crispy whole-wheat and rice cereal with the taste of French toast What we like about it --The super-sweet squares of cereal are decorated with syrupy swirls, yet they have a nice crunch. This is a quick way to get a taste of the breakfast classic without the eggy mess. And there's at least a half-serving of whole grains. What it costs --$3.83 for a 13.6-ounce box. Where to buy --Available in the cereal aisles of most grocery stores.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Nine vendors whose companies include major names in the U.S. food industry were charged in federal court in New York yesterday with helping Columbia-based U.S. Foodservice Inc. perpetrate an $800 million accounting fraud that illustrated the pressure on suppliers to engage in a cover-up to maintain lucrative business relationships, attorneys said. The vendors, whose companies included General Mills Inc. and Tyson Foods Inc., were charged with aiding executives of U.S. Foodservice in producing false records that created the illusion of $800 million in added revenues over three years.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | July 7, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - So by now you've probably heard about the 34-year-old woman from Findlay, Ohio, who put some crumbled up granola bars in a pie and won $1 million in the Pillsbury Bake-Off last week. As the cameras flashed and the tapes rolled, Suzanne Conrad, a former children's librarian who grew up in Havre de Grace, confessed how she came up with the winning recipe: "I couldn't bake an apple pie, so I made this one instead." Give a million dollars to a cook who can't make an apple pie?
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
I'm old enough to remember that it was a big deal when athletes were chosen to grace the front of a Wheaties box, yet I've never eaten a flake of it. General Mills would like to change that. The company has unveiled a promotion that, for the first time in the 90-year history of Wheaties, will allow the public to choose who's going on the iconic orange carton. The selection of athletes and the methodology show how General Mills is skewing younger with this promotion, the Wheaties Next Challenge . Lacrosse, the fastest-growing sport at the college and high school levels, gets a nod -- Rob Pannell, a former Cornell All-American and now a star with Major League Lacrosse's New York Lizards, is one of the five athletes up for the vote.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Nine vendors whose companies include major names in the U.S. food industry were charged in federal court in New York yesterday with helping Columbia-based U.S. Foodservice Inc. perpetrate an $800 million accounting fraud that illustrated the pressure on suppliers to engage in a cover-up to maintain lucrative business relationships, attorneys said. The vendors, whose companies included General Mills Inc. and Tyson Foods Inc., were charged with aiding executives of U.S. Foodservice in producing false records that created the illusion of $800 million in added revenues over three years.
NEWS
April 17, 2003
Charles H. Bell, 95, son of General Mills founder James Ford Bell and a former company president, died Saturday in Santa Barbara, Calif. With his father and grandfather, Mr. Bell played a key role in shaping General Mills, the Golden Valley-based food maker. In his time at the helm, Mr. Bell broadened the company's holdings to include toys, clothing and retail. He joined General Mills in 1930 at age 22. During his 47 years at the company, he worked in accounting, auditing, sales, research and production.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 18, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - General Mills Inc., the maker of Cheerios and Wheaties cereals, said yesterday that its fiscal first-quarter profit rose 18 percent as the company sold more yogurt and snacks and reduced interest and other expenses. Net income for the quarter that ended Aug. 26 rose to $188 million, or 64 cents a share, from $158.9 million, or 55 cents, a year earlier. Revenue rose 5.7 percent, to $1.77 billion from $1.67 billion, the company said. Interest expense dropped 11 percent in the quarter as interest rates fell, Chief Financial Officer James Lawrence said.
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