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May 7, 1995
Leesburg, Va., will be filled with infantry, cavalry, sutlers, wagons and carriages Saturday and May 14 as the Loudoun Museum presents "The Road to Antietam."North King Street will be closed to traffic from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days, and the hands of time turn back to the year of 1862 as General Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia pass through town on their way to the Battle of Antietam.The event depicts a Civil War funeral, a military court, a field hospital, a fashion show and an 1860 ball.
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Dan Rodricks | June 18, 2012
It was a big, beautiful weekend for Sailabration in the city of Baltimore, with superb weather, tall ships, Blue Angels, sailboats in the Inner Harbor (and at least one canoe), even a reason for the party (War of 1812 commemoration). And while I'm sure the opening of the new Wegman's in Columbia was exciting, it couldn't compete with Sailabration. ••• But all those people - gobs of people, mobs of people in downtown Baltimore! They were absolutely everywhere during Sailabration, crowding the promenade and the bridges connecting the piers.
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NEWS
By Bridget Seamon and Bridget Seamon,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
On July 1, 1863, Union and Confederate troops clashed at the Battle of Gettysburg in what proved to be Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's his final effort to move decisively from Virginia into the Northern states. Today, the battleground is covered with monuments and markers in remembrance of the estimated 51,000 soldiers who were killed, wounded or captured there, according to the National Park Service at Gettysburg. The Union walked away bloodied but victorious, halting Lee's attack and ultimately, the Confederate war effort.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 5, 2005
One's fondness for the big-screen Dukes of Hazzard will depend on how many times one can be gladdened by hearing the exclamation "Yeeeeeee-haaaaaa." That's certainly the dominant line of dialogue in this movie, a multimillion-dollar version of a bargain-basement, down-home comedy that ran on CBS from 1979 to 1985. As the rhymingly named Luke Duke, Johnny Knoxville gets to scream it 47 times, while Willie Nelson as moonshining Uncle Jesse Duke bellows it 19 times and Jessica Simpson as the buxom, short-shorted Daisy Duke squeals it 11 times.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1995
GETTYSBURG -- At this very moment, the spitting image of Gen. Robert E. Lee is outside his tent bowing to a lady and kissing her hand. That much is clear. What's blurry is just when "this very moment" occurs.One supposes the present.A living-history group called the Maryland Members of the Confederacy -- led by Carole and Art Twigg, who live in Sykesville and portray the white-haired general and his wife -- is camped now at General Lee's headquarters at Gettysburg. The encampment is one of several events marking the anniversary of the great Civil War battle here July 1, 2 and 3, 1863.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 7, 1991
The climactic battle for the Shenandoah Valley, General Pickett's headlong charge at Gettysburg and the first and second battles of Manassas are the stuff Richard Berg has fashioned a business from.Mr. Berg, 47, a former New York City criminal defense lawyer, is the inventor of more than a dozen Civil War games designed to give Civil War buffs an opportunity to change history."I think of the games as paper time machines that re-create the Civil War," Mr. Berg said."We give players the battlefield, the soldiers and the basic rules.
NEWS
July 2, 1998
Military scheduleFriday, July 3* 10 a.m.: Mortar fire demonstration* 4 p.m.: First Contact: The Great Battle Begins: Buford's stand, Reynolds' 1st Corps, Heth's division, Rodes arrives, the Confederate sweepSaturday, July 4* 10 a.m.: Hood's Advance: the Triangular Field, the Orange Blossoms Fall, the Battle for Little Round Top begins, the Wheatfield* 1 p.m.: Cavalry battle actions* 2 p.m.: The Battle for Little Round Top Rages: Vincent's Brigade and the...
NEWS
June 28, 1998
THE EVENTSMILITARY SCHEDULEFriday, July 3* 10 a.m.: Mortar fire demonstration* 4 p.m.: First Contact: The Great Battle Begins: Buford's stand, Reynolds' 1st Corps, Heth's division, Rodes arrives, the Confederate sweepSaturday, July 4* 10 a.m.: Hood's Advance: the Triangular Field, the Orange Blossoms Fall, the Battle for Little Round Top begins, the Wheatfield* 1 p.m.: Cavalry battle actions* 2 p.m.: The Battle for Little Round Top Rages: Vincent's Brigade...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 18, 2012
It was a big, beautiful weekend for Sailabration in the city of Baltimore, with superb weather, tall ships, Blue Angels, sailboats in the Inner Harbor (and at least one canoe), even a reason for the party (War of 1812 commemoration). And while I'm sure the opening of the new Wegman's in Columbia was exciting, it couldn't compete with Sailabration. ••• But all those people - gobs of people, mobs of people in downtown Baltimore! They were absolutely everywhere during Sailabration, crowding the promenade and the bridges connecting the piers.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 5, 2005
One's fondness for the big-screen Dukes of Hazzard will depend on how many times one can be gladdened by hearing the exclamation "Yeeeeeee-haaaaaa." That's certainly the dominant line of dialogue in this movie, a multimillion-dollar version of a bargain-basement, down-home comedy that ran on CBS from 1979 to 1985. As the rhymingly named Luke Duke, Johnny Knoxville gets to scream it 47 times, while Willie Nelson as moonshining Uncle Jesse Duke bellows it 19 times and Jessica Simpson as the buxom, short-shorted Daisy Duke squeals it 11 times.
NEWS
July 5, 2005
ANTIETAM is the site of the bloodiest day of combat in any war in all of this nation's history. Since the awful day in 1862, the battlefield has always been treated as a solemn, ghostly place. Its monuments are modest; the prevailing aesthetic is to leave things as they were. As a result, the rolling hills have changed little in a century and a half. A visitor can walk Bloody Lane and Burnside Bridge and still imagine the intense fighting that left 23,000 men dead or wounded. The latest conflict to visit Sharpsburg is over a fairly new arrival - a 24-foot bronze statue of Robert E. Lee sitting astride his horse.
NEWS
By Bridget Seamon and Bridget Seamon,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
On July 1, 1863, Union and Confederate troops clashed at the Battle of Gettysburg in what proved to be Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's his final effort to move decisively from Virginia into the Northern states. Today, the battleground is covered with monuments and markers in remembrance of the estimated 51,000 soldiers who were killed, wounded or captured there, according to the National Park Service at Gettysburg. The Union walked away bloodied but victorious, halting Lee's attack and ultimately, the Confederate war effort.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1999
The last meeting between Robert E. Lee and George Gordon Meade, on the Gettysburg battlefield in 1863, determined the course of American history.Yesterday, they met again. Sort of.Their great-great-grandsons -- both of them namesakes -- got together in Taneytown to rehearse for a radio play in which they portray the commanding generals in the Civil War's pivotal battle.Their meeting wasn't as momentous as the one at Gettysburg. It was a bit awkward. After all, an athletic director from Maryland (Lee)
NEWS
July 2, 1998
Military scheduleFriday, July 3* 10 a.m.: Mortar fire demonstration* 4 p.m.: First Contact: The Great Battle Begins: Buford's stand, Reynolds' 1st Corps, Heth's division, Rodes arrives, the Confederate sweepSaturday, July 4* 10 a.m.: Hood's Advance: the Triangular Field, the Orange Blossoms Fall, the Battle for Little Round Top begins, the Wheatfield* 1 p.m.: Cavalry battle actions* 2 p.m.: The Battle for Little Round Top Rages: Vincent's Brigade and the...
NEWS
June 28, 1998
THE EVENTSMILITARY SCHEDULEFriday, July 3* 10 a.m.: Mortar fire demonstration* 4 p.m.: First Contact: The Great Battle Begins: Buford's stand, Reynolds' 1st Corps, Heth's division, Rodes arrives, the Confederate sweepSaturday, July 4* 10 a.m.: Hood's Advance: the Triangular Field, the Orange Blossoms Fall, the Battle for Little Round Top begins, the Wheatfield* 1 p.m.: Cavalry battle actions* 2 p.m.: The Battle for Little Round Top Rages: Vincent's Brigade...
NEWS
By Andrew D. Faith and Andrew D. Faith,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1998
Thousands of Civil War re-enactors are converging on Gettysburg, Pa., next week, much as the original armies converged there in 1863.By mid-June of that year, the Northern and Southern armies were arriving at positions that would make a clash in southern Pennsylvania likely.Brig. Gen. Albert G. Jenkins had crossed the Potomac River on June 15 with his gray cavalry brigade, and Maj. Gen. Robert E. Rodes' infantry division had followed the next day. The infantry corps of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet and Lt. Gen. A. P. Hill crossed the Potomac on June 24 and 25. On June 25 Longstreet and Hill united their columns at Hagerstown.
NEWS
By Andrew D. Faith and Andrew D. Faith,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1998
Thousands of Civil War re-enactors are converging on Gettysburg, Pa., next week, much as the original armies converged there in 1863.By mid-June of that year, the Northern and Southern armies were arriving at positions that would make a clash in southern Pennsylvania likely.Brig. Gen. Albert G. Jenkins had crossed the Potomac River on June 15 with his gray cavalry brigade, and Maj. Gen. Robert E. Rodes' infantry division had followed the next day. The infantry corps of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet and Lt. Gen. A. P. Hill crossed the Potomac on June 24 and 25. On June 25 Longstreet and Hill united their columns at Hagerstown.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1999
The last meeting between Robert E. Lee and George Gordon Meade, on the Gettysburg battlefield in 1863, determined the course of American history.Yesterday, they met again. Sort of.Their great-great-grandsons -- both of them namesakes -- got together in Taneytown to rehearse for a radio play in which they portray the commanding generals in the Civil War's pivotal battle.Their meeting wasn't as momentous as the one at Gettysburg. It was a bit awkward. After all, an athletic director from Maryland (Lee)
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1995
GETTYSBURG -- At this very moment, the spitting image of Gen. Robert E. Lee is outside his tent bowing to a lady and kissing her hand. That much is clear. What's blurry is just when "this very moment" occurs.One supposes the present.A living-history group called the Maryland Members of the Confederacy -- led by Carole and Art Twigg, who live in Sykesville and portray the white-haired general and his wife -- is camped now at General Lee's headquarters at Gettysburg. The encampment is one of several events marking the anniversary of the great Civil War battle here July 1, 2 and 3, 1863.
FEATURES
May 7, 1995
Leesburg, Va., will be filled with infantry, cavalry, sutlers, wagons and carriages Saturday and May 14 as the Loudoun Museum presents "The Road to Antietam."North King Street will be closed to traffic from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days, and the hands of time turn back to the year of 1862 as General Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia pass through town on their way to the Battle of Antietam.The event depicts a Civil War funeral, a military court, a field hospital, a fashion show and an 1860 ball.
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