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By Los Angeles Times | June 2, 1995
MOSCOW -- Russia's most charismatic general, Lt. Gen. Alexander I. Lebed, has resigned his army command to protest Kremlin policies and is widely believed to be preparing to run for political office -- possibly challenging President Boris N. Yeltsin in 1996.Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev approved General Lebed's letter of resignation yesterday. It is now up to Mr. Yeltsin to decide whether the 45-year-old war hero poses more of a threat from his post as commander of the 14th Army in Trans-Dniester or from outside the army as a political rival.
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NEWS
October 18, 1996
THE MARCH TO CIVILITY by Russia is shown by the loser of a vicious Kremlin power struggle, accused of heinous offenses, freely giving a radio interview to announce his intended return to vigorous politics. Gen. Alexander Lebed is out. He is not through.The young retired army general came in a startling third in last June's presidential election. Then he performed two great services to President Boris Yeltsin and Russia. The first was to throw his support behind the incumbent against the Communist challenger, Gennady Zyuganov, in the July run-off.
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NEWS
June 20, 1996
THE PROMOTION of retired Gen. Alexander Lebed -- and the quick firing of Defense Minister Pavel Grachev -- are such stunningly deft and opportunistic moves on the part of President Boris N. Yeltsin that there is a danger of overestimating their long-term significance. In the short term, though, Mr. Yeltsin may well have assured his re-election by including his tough-talking No. 2 challenger in his inner circle as the top national security adviser.Unlike the United States, that position in Russia means overseeing both the armed forces and the internal security apparatus.
NEWS
July 3, 1996
FIVE YEARS after the collapse of communism, Russia may have many outward trappings of an open society but it is far from a normal Western-style democracy. Just consider the bizarre disappearance of President Boris N. Yeltsin and the difficult-to-believe official assurances that he just lost his voice and had to cancel prior commitments on the eve of today's crucial run-off election.In a truly open country, the media and the voters would demand full disclosure. Not in Russia, though, where it has for centuries been an accepted practice to utter untruths and have them not challenged by others, even though they are easily recognized as lies.
NEWS
October 18, 1996
THE MARCH TO CIVILITY by Russia is shown by the loser of a vicious Kremlin power struggle, accused of heinous offenses, freely giving a radio interview to announce his intended return to vigorous politics. Gen. Alexander Lebed is out. He is not through.The young retired army general came in a startling third in last June's presidential election. Then he performed two great services to President Boris Yeltsin and Russia. The first was to throw his support behind the incumbent against the Communist challenger, Gennady Zyuganov, in the July run-off.
NEWS
June 18, 1996
THE SURPRISINGLY strong No. 3 finish of retired Gen. Alexander Lebed in Sunday's presidential elections underscores how unhappy many Russians are about their country's situation. By not voting in larger numbers for the second-place finisher, communist Gennady Zyuganov, they signaled they do not want the return of Marxist-Leninist rule. But many are not satisfied with the first-round winner either, blaming President Boris N. Yeltsin for economic hardships, crime, social instability and war in Chechnya.
NEWS
By Jerry F. Hough | June 26, 1996
THE SELECTION of retired Gen. Alexander Lebed as chief of the Russian Security Council almost surely guarantees Boris Yeltsin's election as president next month. He now has credible force at his disposal to deal with a recalcitrant Parliament and demonstrations in the streets, and Russia has a powerful new contender in the struggle to succeed Mr. Yeltsin.In the United States, the Security Council deals with foreign policy, and the national-security adviser is an insignificant figure in domestic politics.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | November 4, 1994
Washington -- TWO RUSSIAN leaders now engage our attention. One, because we think we know him well -- but don't. The other, because we do not know him at all -- but soon will.First, the well-known one, Boris Yeltsin. The predominant view of the Clinton administration is that Mr. Yeltsin is at least close to creating a real democrat, and that our interests are well served by his longevity. He will be in power a long time, they persist in saying.But behind what seems more and more to be a Potemkin facade, a new Boris Yeltsin is emerging in the eyes of the people who know him best.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 26, 1995
TIRASPOL, Moldova -- Brusque, even coarse and perpetually scowling, Alexander Lebed is on his way to becoming a popular hero in Russia: a rough-and-ready lieutenant general who speaks his mind but who kept his troops out of war.Last week, Russians began to talk seriously about him as a candidate for president.General Lebed is on the periphery of the Russian world -- in Moldova, a small country far from Moscow. He commands an army that stayed behind when the Soviet Union broke up, and he used that army in 1992 to smother a nasty little war of secession.
NEWS
November 10, 1995
HERE'S WHAT Gen. Alexander Lebed, the potential presidential candidate of the Russian nationalist right, had to say about Boris Yeltsin's defense minister, Pavel Grachev: "He has lost his honor. He is a prostitute, and I don't like prostitutes, whether in skirts or pants." The quotation is instructive because Mr. Grachev is the fellow who has just signed an agreement with U.S. Defense Secretary William Perry to have Russian troops serve in Bosnia under American generals.This accord is sure to be a big issue in the Russian parliamentary elections scheduled next month.
NEWS
June 29, 1996
REGARDLESS OF WHO wins Russia's July 3 presidential run-off, one thing appears to be certain: The next Kremlin administration will be more isolationist and wary of Western influences.This shift is likely to slow the pace of key reforms, such as $H privatization, and cause friction with foreign corporations and organizations active in Russia. The flood of Western mass culture -- from movies to music records -- will be curtailed and obtaining residents' visas will become more difficult for foreigners.
NEWS
By Jerry F. Hough | June 26, 1996
THE SELECTION of retired Gen. Alexander Lebed as chief of the Russian Security Council almost surely guarantees Boris Yeltsin's election as president next month. He now has credible force at his disposal to deal with a recalcitrant Parliament and demonstrations in the streets, and Russia has a powerful new contender in the struggle to succeed Mr. Yeltsin.In the United States, the Security Council deals with foreign policy, and the national-security adviser is an insignificant figure in domestic politics.
NEWS
June 20, 1996
THE PROMOTION of retired Gen. Alexander Lebed -- and the quick firing of Defense Minister Pavel Grachev -- are such stunningly deft and opportunistic moves on the part of President Boris N. Yeltsin that there is a danger of overestimating their long-term significance. In the short term, though, Mr. Yeltsin may well have assured his re-election by including his tough-talking No. 2 challenger in his inner circle as the top national security adviser.Unlike the United States, that position in Russia means overseeing both the armed forces and the internal security apparatus.
NEWS
June 18, 1996
THE SURPRISINGLY strong No. 3 finish of retired Gen. Alexander Lebed in Sunday's presidential elections underscores how unhappy many Russians are about their country's situation. By not voting in larger numbers for the second-place finisher, communist Gennady Zyuganov, they signaled they do not want the return of Marxist-Leninist rule. But many are not satisfied with the first-round winner either, blaming President Boris N. Yeltsin for economic hardships, crime, social instability and war in Chechnya.
NEWS
November 10, 1995
HERE'S WHAT Gen. Alexander Lebed, the potential presidential candidate of the Russian nationalist right, had to say about Boris Yeltsin's defense minister, Pavel Grachev: "He has lost his honor. He is a prostitute, and I don't like prostitutes, whether in skirts or pants." The quotation is instructive because Mr. Grachev is the fellow who has just signed an agreement with U.S. Defense Secretary William Perry to have Russian troops serve in Bosnia under American generals.This accord is sure to be a big issue in the Russian parliamentary elections scheduled next month.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 2, 1995
MOSCOW -- Russia's most charismatic general, Lt. Gen. Alexander I. Lebed, has resigned his army command to protest Kremlin policies and is widely believed to be preparing to run for political office -- possibly challenging President Boris N. Yeltsin in 1996.Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev approved General Lebed's letter of resignation yesterday. It is now up to Mr. Yeltsin to decide whether the 45-year-old war hero poses more of a threat from his post as commander of the 14th Army in Trans-Dniester or from outside the army as a political rival.
NEWS
June 29, 1996
REGARDLESS OF WHO wins Russia's July 3 presidential run-off, one thing appears to be certain: The next Kremlin administration will be more isolationist and wary of Western influences.This shift is likely to slow the pace of key reforms, such as $H privatization, and cause friction with foreign corporations and organizations active in Russia. The flood of Western mass culture -- from movies to music records -- will be curtailed and obtaining residents' visas will become more difficult for foreigners.
NEWS
July 3, 1996
FIVE YEARS after the collapse of communism, Russia may have many outward trappings of an open society but it is far from a normal Western-style democracy. Just consider the bizarre disappearance of President Boris N. Yeltsin and the difficult-to-believe official assurances that he just lost his voice and had to cancel prior commitments on the eve of today's crucial run-off election.In a truly open country, the media and the voters would demand full disclosure. Not in Russia, though, where it has for centuries been an accepted practice to utter untruths and have them not challenged by others, even though they are easily recognized as lies.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 26, 1995
TIRASPOL, Moldova -- Brusque, even coarse and perpetually scowling, Alexander Lebed is on his way to becoming a popular hero in Russia: a rough-and-ready lieutenant general who speaks his mind but who kept his troops out of war.Last week, Russians began to talk seriously about him as a candidate for president.General Lebed is on the periphery of the Russian world -- in Moldova, a small country far from Moscow. He commands an army that stayed behind when the Soviet Union broke up, and he used that army in 1992 to smother a nasty little war of secession.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | November 4, 1994
Washington -- TWO RUSSIAN leaders now engage our attention. One, because we think we know him well -- but don't. The other, because we do not know him at all -- but soon will.First, the well-known one, Boris Yeltsin. The predominant view of the Clinton administration is that Mr. Yeltsin is at least close to creating a real democrat, and that our interests are well served by his longevity. He will be in power a long time, they persist in saying.But behind what seems more and more to be a Potemkin facade, a new Boris Yeltsin is emerging in the eyes of the people who know him best.
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