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General Janet Reno

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October 6, 1994
U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno will be guest speaker Oct. 15 at a countywide neighborhood summit on crime prevention at Harford Community College.The summit is the creation of County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann, who said its purpose is to help find neighborhood-based solutions to drug and crime problems "because our usual way of doing business isn't going to get the results we need."As the nation's country's chief law-enforcement official, Mrs. Reno will offer ideas for strengthening America's neighborhoods, Mrs. Rehrmann said.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
The attorneys general for Maryland and the United States exhorted an overflow audience at the Johns Hopkins University last night to press for more sweeping measures to reduce the roughly 30,000 annual deaths caused by guns. "We changed the culture on smoking, and we can do the same thing on gun violence," Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. told about 200 listeners in Schafler Auditorium. Maryland has been a leader among states in fighting tobacco companies. U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno praised Maryland's recently passed law that requires safety locks on handguns, and she suggested further steps.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
The attorneys general for Maryland and the United States exhorted an overflow audience at the Johns Hopkins University last night to press for more sweeping measures to reduce the roughly 30,000 annual deaths caused by guns. "We changed the culture on smoking, and we can do the same thing on gun violence," Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. told about 200 listeners in Schafler Auditorium. Maryland has been a leader among states in fighting tobacco companies. U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno praised Maryland's recently passed law that requires safety locks on handguns, and she suggested further steps.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2000
The country could see rising crime rates without programs to help inmates make a smooth transition from prison to their old neighborhood and old temptations, U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno said yesterday during a visit to Baltimore, where she called on Congress to spend $145 million on such programs nationwide. Speaking with civic leaders at St. Katherine's Episcopal Church in Druid Heights, Reno praised Baltimore community groups that help ex-convicts adjust to life outside prison and said such programs are critical as the nation's prison population approaches a record 2 million inmates.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Senior Justice Department prosecutors are recommending that Attorney General Janet Reno seek appointment of an independent counsel to investigate allegations against Labor Secretary Alexis Herman, government sources said yesterday.If Reno accepts their recommendation, which comes after a five-month preliminary investigation, she will petition the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals early next week to name the sixth special counsel to investigate the Clinton administration since it took office in January 1993.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The special prosecutor chosen to investigate President Clinton's Arkansas land dealings says he plans a broad inquiry that would include questioning the president and his wife, Hillary, under oath and an examination of any possible links to the suicide of a senior White House aide.The prosecutor, Robert B. Fiske Jr., is a New York lawyer and former Republican U.S. attorney in Manhattan. Speaking with reporters yesterday after Attorney General Janet Reno announced the selection, he said Ms. Reno had given him a wide grant of authority to conduct "a thorough, complete and impartial" criminal investigation.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Attorney General Janet Reno and her top advisers are weighing a strong recommendation from the former head of the inquiry into illegal campaign donations that she turn over the probe to an independent counsel.In a report summarizing his analysis of the law and facts he gathered as lead prosecutor in the investigation, Charles G. LaBella has intensified political pressure on Reno to change her position and recommend appointment of an outside prosecutor to explore evidence against high-level government officials and Democratic Party fund-raisers.
NEWS
April 16, 1997
POLITICS SPAWNS perversity. Nowhere on the Washington scene is this more apparent than in Attorney General Janet Reno's refusal to appoint an independent counsel to investigate fund-raising irregularities of the Clinton-Gore campaign.Republicans are screaming so loudly they miss the point that Ms. Reno's decision plays right into their hand. And the White House, seeking comfort wherever it can be found, fails to see that the attorney general has put the Democrats in a tight box.Consider: By insisting that prosecutors in the Justice Department are quite capable of handling what has become a very large probe, the attorney general is virtually committed to come up with evidence damaging to her own administration.
NEWS
October 26, 1993
Attorney General Janet Reno's challenge to the entertainment industry to clean up its act regarding gratuitous television violence is exactly the kind of principled stand a public official ought to take on an issue that affects her department.Former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop used his office as a similar bully pulpit to proselytize against cigarette smoking and to speak out forthrightly about the steps needed to combat the spread of AIDS. He was roundly criticized for his views but his message came through loud and clear.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2000
The country could see rising crime rates without programs to help inmates make a smooth transition from prison to their old neighborhood and old temptations, U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno said yesterday during a visit to Baltimore, where she called on Congress to spend $145 million on such programs nationwide. Speaking with civic leaders at St. Katherine's Episcopal Church in Druid Heights, Reno praised Baltimore community groups that help ex-convicts adjust to life outside prison and said such programs are critical as the nation's prison population approaches a record 2 million inmates.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 30, 2000
WASHINGTON -- When Attorney General Janet Reno trekked to Capitol Hill last week to face a gaggle of angry Republicans, it was an exercise nearly as familiar to her, if not as pleasurable, as her early-morning walks. Eyes straight ahead, indifferent to the cameras to her side, Reno has made the march to Congress on countless occasions during her seven years as attorney general. She had expected to be back this week to be questioned again about her decision to order the armed seizure of 6-year-old Elian Gonzalez from the Miami home of his relatives, a raid some Republicans have called shameful, damaging to Elian and unlawful.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | April 26, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Attorney General Janet Reno must be thinking these days that the guy who said a picture is worth a thousand words was a piker. That Associated Press photo of the federal agent brandishing a submachine gun while flushing a scared Elian Gonzalez out of that closet did more to cause her grief than all the words of reproach aimed at her for the armed assault she ordered to return the boy to his father. Without the photo, the protests no doubt would have come anyway from the boy's Miami relatives and all those onlookers who prefer to see the sad saga as a Cold War confrontation between Fidel Castro and Bill Clinton, who hid behind Ms. Reno's skirts for most of the extended episode.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Karen Hosler and Susan Baer and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 25, 2000
WASHINGTON -- With young Elian Gonzalez and his father secluded at Andrews Air Force Base, Republican critics of the pre-dawn seizure of the boy took the first steps yesterday toward congressional hearings into Saturday's forceful raid. As a prelude to such proceedings, Senate Republican leaders summoned Attorney General Janet Reno to Capitol Hill today to explain her decision to order heavily armed federal agents to burst into the Gonzalez home in Miami before the break of day. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, among the Republicans who have angrily criticized the operation, asked Reno to answer to a bipartisan, hand-picked group of 10 senators plus himself in a private meeting to be held today in the most secure room in the Capitol, far from the news media.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Attorney General Janet Reno and her top advisers are weighing a strong recommendation from the former head of the inquiry into illegal campaign donations that she turn over the probe to an independent counsel.In a report summarizing his analysis of the law and facts he gathered as lead prosecutor in the investigation, Charles G. LaBella has intensified political pressure on Reno to change her position and recommend appointment of an outside prosecutor to explore evidence against high-level government officials and Democratic Party fund-raisers.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Senior Justice Department prosecutors are recommending that Attorney General Janet Reno seek appointment of an independent counsel to investigate allegations against Labor Secretary Alexis Herman, government sources said yesterday.If Reno accepts their recommendation, which comes after a five-month preliminary investigation, she will petition the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals early next week to name the sixth special counsel to investigate the Clinton administration since it took office in January 1993.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- FBI Director Louis J. Freeh told Congress yesterday that he disagreed "on a matter of law" with Attorney General Janet Reno when she decided against seeking an independent counsel to investigate fund-raising phone calls by President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore.But Freeh said his recommendation in favor of an outside counsel did not mean that he thought "any particular person has committed a crime or has done anything improper."In his first public statements on what he called the "worst-kept secret in Washington" -- his public split with Reno, his boss, over her decision last week -- Freeh said he believed his advice that she seek an independent counsel "had a sound basis in law and fact."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 9, 1993
NEW YORK -- Bathed continually in television lights and strobes, accompanied by camera crews and autograph collectors as doggedly as by her security guards, praised from every podium by lawyer after lawyer after lawyer, Attorney General Janet Reno spent the weekend enrapturing the American Bar Association.With few celebrated male lawyers around this year, with a triumphal appearance by Justice-to-be Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and quite possibly with the bar group's first female president on the horizon, the ABA convention now under way at a constellation of hotels in midtown Manhattan has been an affair to remember for women.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | April 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In purely political terms, the prudent course for Attorney General Janet Reno would be to name a special prosecutor to look into Democratic fund-raising for the 1996 campaign. Such a decision would insulate her from the charges she is trying to cover up a scandal embarrassing to President Clinton.But the Republican reaction to her refusal to do so has been so extreme that the political equities may be quite different from what they appeared to be.Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich accused Ms. Reno ofbehaving like a latter-day John N. Mitchell, the late attorney general who helped in the Watergate cover-up for President Richard M. Nixon in 1973.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a blunt challenge to Attorney General Janet Reno, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee appealed yesterday to FBI Director Louis J. Freeh to launch his own investigation of Democratic fund-raising improprieties.Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, a Utah Republican, said Freeh has authority to undertake a "concurrent" inquiry independent of the probe already being conducted under Reno's broad direction.Freeh should do that, Hatch asserted, because the FBI director has differed with Reno's decision not to seek an independent counsel to review fund-raising efforts by President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Lyle Denniston contributed to this article | December 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Bucking the advice of the FBI director, Attorney General Janet Reno announced her conclusion yesterday that an independent counsel is not needed to investigate the campaign fund-raising activities of President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore.Bringing to an end a preliminary investigation into campaign fund raising by the two of leaders in the executive branch, Reno said there was no firm evidence that Clinton or Gore broke any federal law."These decisions were arrived at after thousands of hours of investigation and discussion with investigators, attorneys and senior officials at the Justice Department and the FBI," Reno said at a brief news conference that ended the suspense generated by a preliminary inquiry she began three months ago."
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