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NEWS
March 22, 2012
Op-ed writer John Clayton Young suggests that school should be optional for some students ("Why force a kid to go to school?" March 12). He claims a child shouldn't have to attend school if he or she doesn't want to and that forcing people to be there is a violation of their freedom. I couldn't disagree more. There are certainly other ways a child can get an education, acquire knowledge and learn to find his or her way in the world. But a general education opens a child's mind.
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NEWS
By Peter Morici | April 30, 2012
Young people face a cruel irony. Most can't land a decent job without a college education, yet many graduates are locked into poorly paying positions that don't permit repayment of student loans. For two generations, college price tags have risen much faster than inflation and families' ability to pay. More importantly, costs have leaped faster than what graduates can earn over working lifetimes, and many diplomas do not offer a positive return on investment, as measured by graduates' ability to service their debt.
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NEWS
March 5, 1995
Stephen Cohen joins Vision AssociatesDr. Stephen Cohen, an optometrist for the Army for the past 20 years, recently joined Vision Associates in Aberdeen.Dr. Cohen has worked throughout the United States and in Korea. His last assignment with the Army was at Aberdeen Proving Ground.He is a graduate of the Massachusetts College of Optometry and the University of Southern California. He was recently made a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry.Dr. Cohen lives in Bel Air with his wife, Tina, and their three children.
NEWS
March 22, 2012
Op-ed writer John Clayton Young suggests that school should be optional for some students ("Why force a kid to go to school?" March 12). He claims a child shouldn't have to attend school if he or she doesn't want to and that forcing people to be there is a violation of their freedom. I couldn't disagree more. There are certainly other ways a child can get an education, acquire knowledge and learn to find his or her way in the world. But a general education opens a child's mind.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | April 30, 2012
Young people face a cruel irony. Most can't land a decent job without a college education, yet many graduates are locked into poorly paying positions that don't permit repayment of student loans. For two generations, college price tags have risen much faster than inflation and families' ability to pay. More importantly, costs have leaped faster than what graduates can earn over working lifetimes, and many diplomas do not offer a positive return on investment, as measured by graduates' ability to service their debt.
NEWS
April 15, 2004
The Howard County public school system's Department of Special Education and the Special Education Community Advisory Committee will sponsor an open forum for parents and members of the community at 7 o'clock tonight. Parents and community members will have an opportunity to choose from among seven small discussion groups - each including members of the Department of Special Education. Topics include graduation requirements and academic interventions to improve achievement; access to general education and a less restrictive environment; reading, writing and mathematics through eighth grade; and supporting children's social and emotional needs.
NEWS
By Mary Tillar | February 24, 2008
Over the past month, the Anne Arundel County school system has received many e-mails about the special education program for students with emotional disabilities at Chesapeake High School. Many have expressed concern that students enrolled in the Chesapeake Regional Program (CRP), which operates in a wing at Chesapeake High School, pose a safety danger for students in the high school's general education population. It is evident from recent public comments that misperceptions still exist.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2004
The quality of special education throughout Howard County varies drastically by school, despite efforts to unify offerings, members of an advisory committee told the Board of Education last night during a meeting. "Some schools do a fabulous job, some don't," said Anne Long, chairwoman of the Special Education Citizens Advisory Committee. "We want school-based administrators to be guided more by the Department of Special Education." The 2002 reauthorization of the federal No Child Left Behind Act requires all students, including those in special education, to be proficient in reading and math by 2014.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to The Sun | March 11, 2007
The $200,000 allocated to Best Buddies in the proposed $5.2 billion state education budget might not seem like much. For Kelly Smither-Kemp, a 14-year-old with mild retardation, the line item is huge. Best Buddies, which pairs special-education students with students in general education, is Kelly's social lifeline. In her general- and special-education classes at Magothy River Middle School in Arnold, Kelly struggles to make friends, said her mother, Rene Smither of Cape St. Claire. Through the Best Buddies chapter, one of three in county schools, Kelly has bonded with fellow seventh-grader Ericka Landeck.
NEWS
June 6, 1995
The Howard County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has issued a set of recommendations that, while well-meaning in spirit, could prove highly problematic if put into practice. In a report released last week, the group suggests that the county school system eliminate all classes for low achievers, even including special education. Doing away with such courses would establish high expectations for all students, the NAACP's education committee concluded.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Baltimore International College is set to hand over control of its operations to Virginia's Stratford University after restructuring its debt and receiving approval from the required accrediting agencies. The downtown culinary college held its final graduation Dec. 10 and will officially become a branch of Stratford on Jan. 1. Baltimore International students will be able to continue their classes at Stratford in January, and the branch will begin admitting new students in February.
NEWS
By Mary Tillar | February 24, 2008
Over the past month, the Anne Arundel County school system has received many e-mails about the special education program for students with emotional disabilities at Chesapeake High School. Many have expressed concern that students enrolled in the Chesapeake Regional Program (CRP), which operates in a wing at Chesapeake High School, pose a safety danger for students in the high school's general education population. It is evident from recent public comments that misperceptions still exist.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | January 13, 2008
Unlike most students who graduate from high school at age 17 or 18, students with significant special needs can remain in the school system until they are 21. But until recently, those students - even if they attended their community schools - were not allowed to participate in all the activities connected with their senior year, including going to the prom and walking across the stage during the graduation ceremony. The Special Education Community Advisory Committee worked to change that, and in November, a new policy was announced: Children with special needs could participate in all graduation ceremonies, even if they were not going to leave school after the events.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to The Sun | March 11, 2007
The $200,000 allocated to Best Buddies in the proposed $5.2 billion state education budget might not seem like much. For Kelly Smither-Kemp, a 14-year-old with mild retardation, the line item is huge. Best Buddies, which pairs special-education students with students in general education, is Kelly's social lifeline. In her general- and special-education classes at Magothy River Middle School in Arnold, Kelly struggles to make friends, said her mother, Rene Smither of Cape St. Claire. Through the Best Buddies chapter, one of three in county schools, Kelly has bonded with fellow seventh-grader Ericka Landeck.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
An audit released by the State Department of Education this week calls into question more than 120 diplomas awarded to special-education students by city high schools last summer. State officials say that findings involving student records at 24 high schools indicate that the problems seen at Walbrook High Uniform Services Academy - where 93 students were allowed to graduate in June without meeting requirements - might not have been isolated. City school officials vigorously contested the audit's conclusions yesterday.
NEWS
April 15, 2004
The Howard County public school system's Department of Special Education and the Special Education Community Advisory Committee will sponsor an open forum for parents and members of the community at 7 o'clock tonight. Parents and community members will have an opportunity to choose from among seven small discussion groups - each including members of the Department of Special Education. Topics include graduation requirements and academic interventions to improve achievement; access to general education and a less restrictive environment; reading, writing and mathematics through eighth grade; and supporting children's social and emotional needs.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1994
Starting this fall, students at Anne Arundel Community College interested in early childhood education will be able to get an associate's degree that will qualify them for jobs in the child care field.The Maryland Higher Education Commission has approved the 60-credit career program, college officials said."The idea is to get the students to know the stages of child development, both physically and emotionally," said Rosemary Wolfe, chairwoman of the college's education department.After their course work is completed, students will receive an associate's degree in early childhood education that will qualify them for jobs such as director of a child care center, junior teacher in prekindergarten classes, preschool teacher and instructional aide in nursery, kindergarten or at the elementary level.
NEWS
January 28, 1992
Western Maryland College in Westminster is one of the good, small, privately endowed liberal arts colleges of Maryland that has been concentrating on what it does best for 125 years. With the great new library made possible by the generosity of both the state and longtime benefactors Dr. Samuel and Elsie Hoover, the college is facing the future with optimism.Times are tough, the freshman-aged population is down and the recession makes private tuition impossible for many. But this will change.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2004
The quality of special education throughout Howard County varies drastically by school, despite efforts to unify offerings, members of an advisory committee told the Board of Education last night during a meeting. "Some schools do a fabulous job, some don't," said Anne Long, chairwoman of the Special Education Citizens Advisory Committee. "We want school-based administrators to be guided more by the Department of Special Education." The 2002 reauthorization of the federal No Child Left Behind Act requires all students, including those in special education, to be proficient in reading and math by 2014.
NEWS
March 28, 2002
Schools must strive to identify at-risk kids in the early grades The report of the success of the Mary E. Moss Academy in Anne Arundel County underscores the importance of full funding for comprehensive alternative education programs ("A school of refuge for second chance," March 17). Principal Vanessa V. Bass' concern about the fate of the students who are returned to their home schools without follow-up services echoes the frustrations of many educators involved in the design and implementation of programs to help meet the needs of at-risk students.
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