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August 3, 1991
William Ball, 60, the flamboyant and inspirational stage director who trained a generation of major actors, died early Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles. The cause of death wasn't immediately known. As founder and general director of San Francisco's American Conservatory Theater, Mr. Ball was a key figure in the regional theater movement that blossomed around the country in the mid-1960s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
A lot has happened, operatically, in Baltimore during the past few years. The city lost its proud Baltimore Opera Company after more than five decades, then gained a sort of second cousin in the form of Lyric Opera Baltimore. Opera Vivente folded its tent after more than a dozen years. Baltimore Opera Theatre came and went in what seemed like a flash. Amid these and other changes, Baltimore Concert Opera , founded by former Baltimore Opera singers, has managed to hang on and maintain a steady course.
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NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 8, 2008
Michael Harrison, general director of the Baltimore Opera Company for the past 20 years, has relinquished administrative duties and assumed the title of artistic director. The change was made "in order to allow him to devote more time to his son, who is critically ill," according a statement released yesterday by the company. Deborah Goetz, senior director of marketing and communications, said Harrison's job change was voluntary. James Handakas has been named acting general director and will be responsible for the administrative and fiscal side of the organization.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
President Barack Obama has nominated Baltimore native Roslyn A. Mazer to be inspector general of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the White House announced Thursday. The former Western High School student is currently the inspector general of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, for which she oversees inspections and audits. From 1993 to 2009 she served in senior positions at the Department of Justice. "During her tenure here, Roslyn has been instrumental in ensuring the highest standards of accountability," Stephanie O'Sullivan, the principal deputy director of national intelligence, said in a statement.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | February 1, 1991
Single tickets go on sale at 9 a.m. Monday for the Baltimore Opera Company's final two productions of the season, Verdi's "A Masked Ball" in March and Puccini's "Madame Butterfly" in April.Verdi's opera will be performed at 8:15 p.m. Saturday, March 9, Wednesday, March 13, Friday, March 15, and at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 17 at The Lyric. Puccini's opera will be presented at 8:15 p.m. Saturday, April 20, Wednesday, April 24 and Friday, April 26 and 3 p.m. Sunday, April 28.Singing in "A Masked Ball" will be Stefka Evstatieva, a Bulgarian soprano, as Amelia; Ruben Dominguez, a Venezuelan (replacing the originally scheduled Kristjan Johannsson)
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 15, 2009
The recession - or is it the Great Depression II? - continues to take its toll on the local arts scene. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra laid off five of its 67 administrative employees and changed one full-time position to part-time yesterday in an effort to reduce expenditures. Those moves, along with a decision not to fill certain open staff positions, will save the BSO about $500,000. "We can see that the economic downturn is going to be a lot more prolonged than we had expected," president/CEO Paul Meecham said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
Placido Domingo, as usual, is in full multitask mode as he wraps up his 15-year tenure as general director of Washington National Opera. The famed Spanish tenor has seven more performances to sing as Oreste in the company's first-ever production of Gluck's "Iphigenie en Tauride," which opened last Friday. He'll also switch gears to conduct five performances of Donizetti's "Don Pasquale," which opens this Friday. At 70, Domingo could be pursuing an enviable, pampered life of leisure, but that's a thoroughly alien concept to him. Besides, he gives every indication of thriving on packed schedules like the one he has this month in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
A lot has happened, operatically, in Baltimore during the past few years. The city lost its proud Baltimore Opera Company after more than five decades, then gained a sort of second cousin in the form of Lyric Opera Baltimore. Opera Vivente folded its tent after more than a dozen years. Baltimore Opera Theatre came and went in what seemed like a flash. Amid these and other changes, Baltimore Concert Opera , founded by former Baltimore Opera singers, has managed to hang on and maintain a steady course.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 23, 2003
As you may recall (so to speak), California has been in the news a lot lately, and none too favorably. What with movie stars, TV stars and porn stars vying to succeed the personality challenged governor - if he gets tossed out of office prematurely - the state looks a little more off-beat than usual. That's also how two of California's major musical institutions looked, too, when I checked them. The San Francisco Opera, for example, didn't start its season earlier this month with a staple by Verdi or Puccini, guaranteed to please all the well-heeled folks who love donning their jewels for a grand night of audience-watching and hit-tune-listening.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | September 19, 2005
Since its Parisian premiere 150 years ago, Verdi's I Vespri Siciliani - The Sicilian Vespers - has ranked among the also-rans of his operatic entries. Other than the overture and maybe one or two arias, the work just can't get a firm hold on the public. Some of the trouble is easily spotted. The plot creaks noisily. The music dips in quality here and there. And, even when the original third-act ballet is cut, as in Washington National Opera's new production at the Kennedy Center, the piece is not exactly concise.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
Placido Domingo, as usual, is in full multitask mode as he wraps up his 15-year tenure as general director of Washington National Opera. The famed Spanish tenor has seven more performances to sing as Oreste in the company's first-ever production of Gluck's "Iphigenie en Tauride," which opened last Friday. He'll also switch gears to conduct five performances of Donizetti's "Don Pasquale," which opens this Friday. At 70, Domingo could be pursuing an enviable, pampered life of leisure, but that's a thoroughly alien concept to him. Besides, he gives every indication of thriving on packed schedules like the one he has this month in Washington.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 9, 2009
John R. Miller, retired director of Maryland's Department of General Services and longtime recreational soccer coach, died Wednesday of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Timonium resident was 64. Mr. Miller was born in Miami and was raised in Switzerland and Bangor, Maine. He was a 1962 graduate of Deerfield Academy in Deerfield, Mass. He earned a master's degree in education in 1969 from the Johns Hopkins University and a second master's, also from Hopkins, in administration in 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 15, 2009
The recession - or is it the Great Depression II? - continues to take its toll on the local arts scene. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra laid off five of its 67 administrative employees and changed one full-time position to part-time yesterday in an effort to reduce expenditures. Those moves, along with a decision not to fill certain open staff positions, will save the BSO about $500,000. "We can see that the economic downturn is going to be a lot more prolonged than we had expected," president/CEO Paul Meecham said.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | November 8, 2008
Michael Harrison, general director of the Baltimore Opera Company for the past 20 years, has relinquished administrative duties and assumed the title of artistic director. The change was made "in order to allow him to devote more time to his son, who is critically ill," according a statement released yesterday by the company. Deborah Goetz, senior director of marketing and communications, said Harrison's job change was voluntary. James Handakas has been named acting general director and will be responsible for the administrative and fiscal side of the organization.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | September 19, 2005
Since its Parisian premiere 150 years ago, Verdi's I Vespri Siciliani - The Sicilian Vespers - has ranked among the also-rans of his operatic entries. Other than the overture and maybe one or two arias, the work just can't get a firm hold on the public. Some of the trouble is easily spotted. The plot creaks noisily. The music dips in quality here and there. And, even when the original third-act ballet is cut, as in Washington National Opera's new production at the Kennedy Center, the piece is not exactly concise.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 23, 2003
As you may recall (so to speak), California has been in the news a lot lately, and none too favorably. What with movie stars, TV stars and porn stars vying to succeed the personality challenged governor - if he gets tossed out of office prematurely - the state looks a little more off-beat than usual. That's also how two of California's major musical institutions looked, too, when I checked them. The San Francisco Opera, for example, didn't start its season earlier this month with a staple by Verdi or Puccini, guaranteed to please all the well-heeled folks who love donning their jewels for a grand night of audience-watching and hit-tune-listening.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 9, 2009
John R. Miller, retired director of Maryland's Department of General Services and longtime recreational soccer coach, died Wednesday of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Timonium resident was 64. Mr. Miller was born in Miami and was raised in Switzerland and Bangor, Maine. He was a 1962 graduate of Deerfield Academy in Deerfield, Mass. He earned a master's degree in education in 1969 from the Johns Hopkins University and a second master's, also from Hopkins, in administration in 1974.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2002
Dr. Salvatore R. Donohue, a physician and former medical director at Maryland General Hospital, died Saturday of a heart attack while on vacation at Bethany Beach, Del. He was 64 and had residences in Homeland and in Stuart, Fla. An internist who practiced in Baltimore, he was also a hospital administrator. "He helped bring Maryland General from a small, surgically oriented local hospital to a full-service community hospital," said Dr. Robert Roby, chief of emergency medicine at Maryland General.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2002
Dr. Salvatore R. Donohue, a physician and former medical director at Maryland General Hospital, died Saturday of a heart attack while on vacation at Bethany Beach, Del. He was 64 and had residences in Homeland and in Stuart, Fla. An internist who practiced in Baltimore, he was also a hospital administrator. "He helped bring Maryland General from a small, surgically oriented local hospital to a full-service community hospital," said Dr. Robert Roby, chief of emergency medicine at Maryland General.
NEWS
August 3, 1991
William Ball, 60, the flamboyant and inspirational stage director who trained a generation of major actors, died early Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles. The cause of death wasn't immediately known. As founder and general director of San Francisco's American Conservatory Theater, Mr. Ball was a key figure in the regional theater movement that blossomed around the country in the mid-1960s.
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