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General Development Plan

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NEWS
July 7, 1997
SOUTH COUNTY RESIDENTS in Shady Side, Deale and Mayo are once again forcing Anne Arundel County planners and politicians to explain how the proposed General Development Plan will affect their communities.This is not a bad thing. Their questioning has forced planners to focus more sharply on the issues of controlling growth.Earlier in the process, South County residents had problems with wording in the plan.In their minds, the designation "primary growth area" meant that high-density development would be dumped into their relatively rural communities.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Opponents of a controversial Anne Arundel County zoning change filed suit Thursday in county Circuit Court, seeking to overturn the legislation that could intensify growth in some of the county's most rural areas. The suit alleges that the County Council violated state law in passing several amendments to the bill because the changes would allow development that opponents believe is prohibited by long-established land-use principles. It asks the court to throw out all or part of the bill and force the council to restart the zoning process.
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NEWS
June 20, 1997
PLANNERS LISTENED to the citizens' complaints about Anne Arundel County's proposed General Development Plan and made appropriate changes: The designation of a "primary growth area" has been dropped. And, the density of future development in South County communities has been reduced.With these alterations, the Department of Planning and Code Enforcement improved what was already a thoughtfully constructed master plan. The revised version contains the same basic philosophy for growth.It still calls for funneling 90 percent of future development into the 40 percent of the county that has water and sewer service.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2011
Anne Arundel County residents, disgruntled by a series of zoning changes affirmed by the County Council last week, are weighing legal options to challenge what they claim is a violation of state law. The County Council overturned 10 vetoed amendments to the comprehensive rezoning bill for South County and Annapolis, allowing zoning changes on a number of projects, including a 118-acre trailer park. County Executive John R. Leopold vetoed 16 amendments to the bill last month, calling them a "flagrant violation" of long-standing development principles.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | January 25, 2009
County officials are encouraging residents to submit comments on a draft of the General Development Plan, the final version of which is to be completed later this year. The land-use plan, which is required by the state, is revised every decade. The plan is meant to serve as a guide for county growth and development during next 10 to 20 years. The more than 200-page draft addresses several topics, including land use and development policy, priority preservation areas, transportation and water resources.
NEWS
January 13, 1997
Jessup Improvement Association has scheduled a town meeting from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Jan. 23 at Jessup Community Hall, 2920 Jessup Road.Members of the association's land-use committee will present the results of their investigation of the proposed General Development Plan for the county and how it would affect Jessup.Some residents have complained about increasing residential densities and commercial or industrial development in their area outlined in the county's proposed General Development Plan.
NEWS
March 24, 1991
Early plans for a business park near the county airport received theapproval of city planners last week.The Planning and Zoning Commission gave its blessing to the general development plan for the proposed 33-acre Carroll National Instrument Co., the Baltimore-based developer of the proposed park, is requesting annexation and rezoning ofthe tract, located east of Route 97.As part of its approval, the commission requested the developer be willing to pay...
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | January 22, 2007
After conducting a nationwide search for a planning director, Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold has made acting director Lois Villemaire his choice to oversee the county's fast-paced growth. Villemaire, a 58-year-old Annapolis resident, takes over the department at a time of explosive growth, fueled by the 20,000 jobs expected to arrive at Fort Meade within the next four years. The base expansion is triggering billions of dollars in retail, office and residential construction across Anne Arundel - and putting pressure on the county to upgrade roads and other infrastructure.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1997
Responding to loud complaints from south county residents, Anne Arundel County has backed away from a proposal to increase the planned density of residential development on two peninsulas.More than 1,000 acres on the Mayo and Shady Side peninsulas south of Annapolis will continue to be marked for up to two homes an acre instead of up to five homes an acre.This change in the county's proposed long-range land-use plan for 1997 through 2020 was announced Friday by Steven Cover, director of the county's Department of Planning and Code Enforcement.
NEWS
August 9, 1995
If you fear what will happen to the empty meadow next door, hate the way Ritchie Highway looks or think something must be done to spark life into downtown Glen Burnie, the Anne Arundel County Department of Planning and Code Enforcement wants to hear from you. The county is working on its "general development plan," a blueprint for zoning and regulations that will guide development for the next 20 to 25 years."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold has vetoed several sections of a zoning bill that recently passed the County Council and sought to intensify development in some of the county's most rural areas. Leopold announced Tuesday that he had vetoed 16 amendments to the comprehensive rezoning bill for South County and Annapolis, which the council passed unanimously last week. Leopold called the amendments in question a "flagrant violation of the principles of the General Development Plan and the Small Area Plans that proceeded it. " The move is likely to be cheered by some South County residents, many of whom opposed the changes.
NEWS
August 10, 2011
For anyone looking into why Maryland's 14-year-old campaign to reduce sprawl development has proved so ineffective, we present the learned members of the Anne Arundel County Council. Next week, they're scheduled to give a demonstration of how not to follow the growth restrictions advocated by their own constituents. As long as anyone can remember, Route 214 (Central Avenue) has been the line of demarcation between the commercial development on Route 2 (Solomons Island Road) and the rural South County.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2011
The Anne Arundel County Council will consider zoning changes to parcels of land across the county beginning next month, a process that will likely take most of the year and begin with projects related to the federal military realignment plan expected to bring thousands of new residents and jobs to the region. In an effort to prepare for the influx, the council plans to tackle the process of comprehensive rezoning incrementally, with legislators first considering rezoning applications in council districts 1 and 4. Those districts are in close proximity to Fort Meade and the National Security Agency — where the bulk of development relating to the Defense Department's base realignment and closure plan, or BRAC, is expected.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | January 25, 2009
County officials are encouraging residents to submit comments on a draft of the General Development Plan, the final version of which is to be completed later this year. The land-use plan, which is required by the state, is revised every decade. The plan is meant to serve as a guide for county growth and development during next 10 to 20 years. The more than 200-page draft addresses several topics, including land use and development policy, priority preservation areas, transportation and water resources.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2007
As Anne Arundel officials delve into the once-a-decade revamping of the county's growth plan, a familiar and controversial face in development circles has been hired as a consultant - former planning officer Joseph W. Rutter Jr. County officials confirmed last week that Rutter, now an executive with a Howard County development company, has been subcontracted by Bethesda-based planning consultant TischlerBise to help measure how future growth would financially...
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | February 2, 2007
One of the two developers of a $500 million housing and retail development near Fort Meade has threatened to scrap that plan and erect an industrial warehouse project on part of the site, unless the county immediately moves to change the property's zoning. Parkland Properties of Millersville is ready to submit plans to Anne Arundel County for 500,000 square feet of warehouse "flex-space" on almost 50 acres in the heart of a 300-acre parcel south of the Oak Hill Youth Center, one of Parkland's partners, Jay Baldwin, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1997
Some Jessup residents don't like the vision of increasing residential and commercial or industrial development in their area outlined in the county's proposed General Development Plan.They say they like the community's rural feel, which is hard enough to maintain sandwiched between Interstate 95 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway and surrounded by prisons.More residential and industrial development would change Jessup's character and worsen traffic congestion on two-lane Route 175, according to Alvera Miller, who has lived in Jessup since 1949.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
Responding to the protests of residents fearful of booming development, Anne Arundel County planners are considering eliminating the controversial term "primary growth area" from their long-term land-use plan.It is not clear, however, if the change will be more than cosmetic.The county Planning Advisory Board met yesterday to discuss possible revisions to the general development plan, including NTC eliminating the "primary growth area" designation.But county officials plan to continue using the same philosophy for managing growth that they've followed for decades, said Richard Josephson, chief of land use and facilities planning for the county.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | January 22, 2007
After conducting a nationwide search for a planning director, Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold has made acting director Lois Villemaire his choice to oversee the county's fast-paced growth. Villemaire, a 58-year-old Annapolis resident, takes over the department at a time of explosive growth, fueled by the 20,000 jobs expected to arrive at Fort Meade within the next four years. The base expansion is triggering billions of dollars in retail, office and residential construction across Anne Arundel - and putting pressure on the county to upgrade roads and other infrastructure.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | July 2, 2000
NEIGHBORING merchants are profoundly interested in how the Parole Plaza shopping center will take shape. Among the businesses are Giolitti Delicatessen & Catering, Fred's Restaurant, Parole Shoe and Luggage Repair and Riley's Cleaners. Business owners have watched from the sidelines as the Parole Plaza's owner dueled with local planners and one very strident county councilwoman. Carl Freedman, a New Jersey resident whose family has owned Parole Plaza for 40 years, wants to lure a giant retailer - Wal-Mart, to be specific.
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