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By Karol V. Menzieand Randy Johnson | September 15, 1990
Trim-out time for electrical, heating and plumbing systems is when the house begins to look and act more finished.Baths get sinks, faucets and toilets. Kitchens get sinks and faucets and range hoods. Heating ducts disappear with tidy grills, and everywhere extension cords recede as electrical outlets multiply. Homeowners start picking out (or at least arguing over) paint colors and collecting wallpaper books.While trim-out is the last stage before decorating, there are some elements of a design scheme that need to be in place first: ceramic or vinyl bathroom floors, for instance.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Baltimore-based Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. has been chosen as general contractor to build Maryland's sixth casino at National Harbor, a nearly $1 billion project on the Potomac River expected to get under way in weeks and be completed in about two years. The casino owner, MGM National Harbor LLC, announced Tuesday that it had chosen Whiting-Turner, which is finishing up work on the state's fifth casino, Horseshoe Casino Baltimore. That $442 million project is expected to open in late August near M&T Bank Stadium, another Whiting-Turner project.
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NEWS
March 15, 1999
COST OVERRUNS and missed deadlines on school projects have dogged many area school systems struggling to keep up with enrollment.Increasingly, boards of education in bigger counties are hiring professional construction management firms to oversee building projects and advise the boards on hiring subcontractors (who do most of the work).The practice provides school boards with valuable -- and often missing -- construction expertise. Paid a set fee, the manager acts as a direct employee of the school board in overseeing projects.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
A Baltimore-based contracting company overbilled the city's Department of Public Works $26,492 last year, according to a report released by the city's inspector general Thursday. According to Baltimore Inspector General David McClintock, EBA Engineering billed the city between March and July of last year for 313 hours of labor that it did not provide. The company had been hired to do design and engineering work to improve the city's sewer system. Nanda Sen, president of EBA Engineering, acknowledged Thursday that his company had indeed overbilled the city and said the problem was caused by a computer coding error.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1997
Host Marriott Corp. of Bethesda said yesterday that it had reached a $70 million settlement in a 13-year-old lawsuit against contractors who built the Marriott Marquis Hotel in New York City.The hotel's general contractor, Morse-Diesel Inc., filed suit against Trinity Industries Inc., of Dallas, and other subcontractors in 1984. The general contractor complained about delays in construction of the hotel's steel structure. The hotel was completed in 1985.To settle the suit, the defendants paid $70 million, most of which will go to Times Square Marquis Hotel LP, an affiliate of Host Marriott.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | December 27, 1990
Kajima International, general contractor of the 30-story Commerce Place now under construction downtown, has been selected to build its second high-rise in Baltimore, the first residential tower of the $600 million HarborView community off Key Highway.The U.S. subsidiary of one of the world's largest construction companies, with headquarters in Japan, Kajima International was selected earlier this month over four other companies that submitted bids to serve as general contractor for the above-ground portion of the 27-story tower, called 100 HarborView Drive.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff and news services | July 20, 2011
Forrest Blue, a quick, powerful center who made the Pro Bowl for the San Francisco 49ers from 1971 to 1974 and finished his career with the Baltimore Colts from 1975 to 1978, died Saturday at an assisted-living center in Carmichael, Calif. He was 66. A first-round draft pick out of Auburn in 1968, Blue was a 49ers mainstay for seven seasons and was a first-team All-Pro in 1971 and 1972. "You can't get around him," former San Diego Chargers defensive tackle Ron East once said.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Baltimore-based Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. has been chosen as general contractor to build Maryland's sixth casino at National Harbor, a nearly $1 billion project on the Potomac River expected to get under way in weeks and be completed in about two years. The casino owner, MGM National Harbor LLC, announced Tuesday that it had chosen Whiting-Turner, which is finishing up work on the state's fifth casino, Horseshoe Casino Baltimore. That $442 million project is expected to open in late August near M&T Bank Stadium, another Whiting-Turner project.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | August 12, 1995
A custom homebuilder with roots in prefabricated housing for World War II veterans has filed for bankruptcy-law protection, citing sluggish sales during the housing slowdown of the past few years.Pridemark Enterprises Inc. of Millersville, one of Maryland's zTC oldest custom builders, sought Chapter 11 protection from creditors Wednesday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore, listing assets of less than $50,000 and debts of more than $1.14 million.But the company, which builds custom, single-family houses in the Baltimore region priced from $120,000 to $500,000, still intends to complete unfinished homes with no delays, plus start a new modular home business, said Roger Blitz, president, and the third generation of his family to head Pridemark.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | March 10, 1991
After taking the brunt of every slump in the homebuilding industry for the last 15 years while watching his employers get rich, Charlie Cockey decided he'd had enough.Last year the construction manager started his own business, Pioneer Inc. of Columbia, which offers people wanting custom-built homes a chance to be their own general contractors, even if they don't know the first thing about homebuilding.While many options are available to homeowners who want to participate in building their home, Cockey's approach is unique, said Bill Young, director of consumer affairs for National Association of Home Builders in Washington.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff and news services | July 20, 2011
Forrest Blue, a quick, powerful center who made the Pro Bowl for the San Francisco 49ers from 1971 to 1974 and finished his career with the Baltimore Colts from 1975 to 1978, died Saturday at an assisted-living center in Carmichael, Calif. He was 66. A first-round draft pick out of Auburn in 1968, Blue was a 49ers mainstay for seven seasons and was a first-team All-Pro in 1971 and 1972. "You can't get around him," former San Diego Chargers defensive tackle Ron East once said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 11, 2010
James Robert "Bobby" Sherman, a general contractor and avid outdoorsman, died Friday of cancer at his Sykesville home. He was 74. Mr. Sherman, the son of farmers, was born and raised in London, Ky. He moved to Baltimore in the 1940s with his mother, who came to work in the city's war plants, and attended city public schools. Mr. Sherman had worked in the construction industry for years and was the owner and operator of Sherman Builders, a commercial and residential construction company.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | March 27, 2009
Edward Erhard Eyring Sr., retired president of a family-owned general contracting firm that built a number of notable Baltimore buildings, died of complications from a stroke March 19 at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Ruxton resident was 89. Mr. Eyring was born and raised in Highlandtown. He was a 1938 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington and attended Villanova University. In 1941, he joined E. Eyring & Sons Co., which had been established by his grandfather, Erhard Eyring, in 1887.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | May 12, 2006
William Leonard Griffith, a general contractor who had been a noted college lacrosse player, ended his life Tuesday in Sparks. He was 78 and spent nearly his whole life in Roland Park. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Griffith attended Polytechnic Institute before graduating in 1946 from Gilman School. Newspaper stories detailed how he played lacrosse, ice hockey and football. He had varsity letters from both schools. A 1944 Sun article noted that he competed on the Poly team against Forest Park at Homewood Field in the Maryland Scholastic Association's first nighttime lacrosse game.
NEWS
April 5, 2005
Thomas "Gator" Price, a retired general contractor, died of lung and heart failure March 29 at North Arundel Hospital. The Pasadena resident was 69. Mr. Price was born and raised on his family's farm in Charlottesville, Va. He worked on the farm until moving to Baltimore in 1979, when he established Thomas Price & Sons, a general contracting firm that specialized in painting, concrete work, home renovation and additions. He closed it because of his failing health in 2002. He enjoyed fishing and playing poker and blackjack.
BUSINESS
By Brian Simpson and Brian Simpson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 1999
When Pam Loya and her husband Roy prepared to open bids from general contractors for a major renovation of their historic Monkton home, Pam had her camera ready. As Roy opened and read the first bid, Pam snapped the photo that froze his expression. Roy's face showed the emotions of a man being simultaneously electrocuted, beaten, and robbed."I expected that kind of face," she said. "But it was even higher than I was thought it would be. I was unpleasantly surprised."While not every bid for a renovation project induces such a strong reaction, homeowners dealing with stratospheric costs may be tempted to try anything to save some money.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | January 15, 1992
The University of Baltimore has begun preparing the southwest corner of Charles Street and Mount Royal Avenue for construction of a five-story building for the Robert G. Merrick School of Business, the newest addition to its growing midtown campus.The construction timetable for the 115,000-square-foot project was moved up as part of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's plan to speed up work on state capital improvement projects to help stimulate the economy. A construction fence will be put up around the site this week so work can begin later this month.
NEWS
March 15, 1999
COST OVERRUNS and missed deadlines on school projects have dogged many area school systems struggling to keep up with enrollment.Increasingly, boards of education in bigger counties are hiring professional construction management firms to oversee building projects and advise the boards on hiring subcontractors (who do most of the work).The practice provides school boards with valuable -- and often missing -- construction expertise. Paid a set fee, the manager acts as a direct employee of the school board in overseeing projects.
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