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By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 1997
When he moved to his 112-acre farm outside Mount Airy 18 years ago, Don Walters bought enough property to build the one amenity his newfound home had to have.Two years later, Walters took his first flight from his own private airstrip, mere yards from his front door.A former commercial airline pilot who spent 23 years with US Airways (formerly USAir and Allegheny Airlines) after learning to fly in the Air Force, Walters, 68, said he had long dreamed of having his single-engine, turboprop airplane "parked right outside your house like your car."
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NEWS
June 20, 2007
The entire aviation industry knows the air traffic control system needs to be modernized ("Cleared for takeoff?" editorial, June 15). However, representatives of the Government Accountability Office and the inspector general of the U.S. Department of Transportation recently testified that the current funding system can raise the needed funds. As the GAO's director of physical infrastructure issues, Gerald L. Dillingham, testified before a House committee in March, "The current funding structure has supported the [Federal Aviation Administration]
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BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 5, 1998
This year, at age 15 -- even before she got her driver's license -- Blair Stahnke began learning to fly."Someday I'd probably like to be an airline pilot, but right now I want to get my private pilot's license and finish high school," said Stahnke, a Grand Prairie, Texas, high school junior.Women represent a vast resource of potential pilots both for general aviation -- the world of private and business flying -- and the airline industry, which depends on general aviation as a pipeline to supply pilots.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 30, 2004
Pilots of corporate and general aviation planes should not take off with any amount of snow, ice or frost on the tops of wings, federal air safety officials said in an unusually broad warning issued yesterday. The alert from the National Transportation Safety Board referred specifically to the crash of a Challenger 601 in Montrose, Colo., last month that killed three of the six people on board, including the son of NBC Sports chief Dick Ebersol. "The bottom line is that pilots should be aware that no amount of snow, ice or frost accumulation on the wing upper surface can be considered safe for takeoff," NTSB said in its alert.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | January 8, 1993
Engineers studying the need for a general aviation airport in Howard County said last night they plan to recommend a site in about five months."The site selection process could also include a no-build option," engineer Gary M. Luczak of Timonium told a gathering of about 75 people at the county office building.The type of general aviation facility envisioned for Howard would accommodate recreational pilots and businesses using privately owned single-engine aircraft or light, twin-engine aircraft, the group was told.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | June 26, 1991
Intense community opposition likely will keep any major commercial development from land near Tipton Army Airfield at Fort Meade, a spokesman for County Executive Robert R. Neall said yesterday.The executive had suggested that one way the county could afford to run Tipton as a self-supporting, general aviation airport would be to lease a 470-acre parcel to businesses and reap property and business taxes.But a spokesman said yesterday the county will take over the airport only if it can support itself by a means acceptable to the community.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | February 27, 1992
County Executive Robert R. Neall toured Odenton yesterday, visiting everything from blocked-off streets to teen-age mothers continuing their education.Neall used the opportunity to announce the first tentative steps toward operating Tipton Airport as a county-owned commercial airfield, as well as a $375,000 Army grant for the Sarah's House homeless shelter.Neall said he found no surprises on his day-long tour. "I pick upa lot just being out and being a part of the landscape," he said.At Fort Meade, which has lost nearly 9,000 acres to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and is scheduled to lose many troop divisions, Neall heard Col. Kent D. Menser describe the installation as a town.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1995
Private planes will be able to start using Tipton Army Airfield at Fort Meade beginning Oct. 1, when the Army turns it over to Anne Arundel and Howard counties to be converted into a public-use airport, according to Sam Minnitte, Anne Arundel's project manager.Mr. Minnitte briefed Anne Arundel's General Assembly delegation on the project at a meeting Friday morning.The Department of Defense designated the 440-acre airfield surplus property during the military's nationwide base closings and realignment in the late 1980s, and the Army must relinquish it by Sept.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2001
Every Saturday morning, the Old Buzzards Evermore, a gaggle of middle-aged pilots, gather around the table in Suburban Airport's lounge and get right down to business. They sip too-strong coffee, nibble on stale cookies and trade rumors: "What have you heard? When can we start flying again?" Since Sept. 11, the Old Buzzards' meetings have been the only activity at Suburban, a tiny airport hugging the Anne Arundel-Prince George's County line in Laurel. One of six general aviation airports that the Federal Aviation Administration has ordered closed since Sept.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1999
Talk about a cursed award.Two years ago, Florence Parlett died a few weeks before the Maryland Aviation Administration could give her its Pioneer Award for founding Lee Airport in Edgewater.Last week, Aubrey Patterson nearly followed Parlett's footsteps. The longtime parachute packer had a heart attack just before the awards ceremony and was unable to attend.However, the 81-year-old Glen Burnie resident quickly recovered and spent yesterday afternoon retrieving two more parachutes to be inspected and repacked.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2003
On a partly cloudy morning this month, the only thing moving on Haysfield Airport's 2,400-foot grass runway is David Bassler's riding lawn mower. Bassler, whose parents own the Clarksville airport and the bucolic 420-acre farm on which it sits, could spend all day mowing and not see more than one plane take off. Nearly two years after terrorists attacked the Pentagon, security-related flight restrictions over the Baltimore-Washington region have driven...
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
For much of the morning, Glenn Clevenger repeated himself as he answered the phone at Suburban Airport. "Hello? Yes, we're open now. No, there are no restrictions now." One by one, pilots strolled back into the Laurel airport's lounge yesterday, smiling -- for the first time in 100 days, they could fly again. "I can't believe it! We're back in the air," shrieked Jim Williamson, who has kept his Navion single-engine plane at Suburban since 1972. The scene replayed itself at Freeway Airport in Bowie and at Maryland Airport in Indian Head.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2001
Every Saturday morning, the Old Buzzards Evermore, a gaggle of middle-aged pilots, gather around the table in Suburban Airport's lounge and get right down to business. They sip too-strong coffee, nibble on stale cookies and trade rumors: "What have you heard? When can we start flying again?" Since Sept. 11, the Old Buzzards' meetings have been the only activity at Suburban, a tiny airport hugging the Anne Arundel-Prince George's County line in Laurel. One of six general aviation airports that the Federal Aviation Administration has ordered closed since Sept.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2001
Tipton Airport never saw this one coming. The 347-acre airport at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County has grown accustomed to delays in its 13-year transition from a military airfield to a general aviation county airport. It landed on, then was quickly removed from, the Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund list of the nation's most hazardous sites. Then, when its board inched ahead on a much-delayed project to build new hangars, a rare plant was found in a drainage ditch and blocked the airport's way. "Airport management is not an exercise in instant gratification," said David Almy, Tipton Airport Authority's spokesman and an executive at a Washington aviation trade group.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2001
Tipton Airport never saw this one coming. The 347-acre airport at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County has grown accustomed to delays in its 13-year transition from a military airfield to a general aviation county airport. It landed on, then was quickly removed from, the Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund list of the nation's most hazardous sites. Then, when its board inched ahead on a much-delayed project to build new hangars, a rare plant was found in a drainage ditch and blocked the airport's way. "Airport management is not an exercise in instant gratification," said David Almy, Tipton Airport Authority's spokesman and an executive at a Washington aviation trade group.
NEWS
By From staff reports | July 11, 2000
In Baltimore County Prison inmate, 41, indicted in robbery, killing in 1986 TOWSON - A county grand jury indicted a 41-year-old prison inmate yesterday on first-degree murder, attempted murder, robbery, assault and handgun charges in a 1986 robbery and killing in Woodlawn. Leon Copeland, incarcerated at the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup, was indicted after a preserved sample of DNA from the scene linked him to the killing of Lawrence Gregory Dye and an attack on Edna Dye, said Assistant State's Attorney S. Ann Brobst.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1995
Private planes will be able to start using Tipton Army Airfield at Fort Meade beginning Oct. 1, when the Army turns it over to Anne Arundel and Howard counties to be converted into a public-use airport, according to Sam Minnitte, Anne Arundel's project manager.Mr. Minnitte briefed Anne Arundel's General Assembly delegation on the project at a meeting Friday morning.The Department of Defense designated the 440-acre airfield surplus property during the military's nationwide base closings and realignment in the late 1980s, and the Army must relinquish it by Sept.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2001
Tipton Airport never saw this one coming. The 347-acre airport at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County has grown accustomed to delays in its 13-year transition from a military airfield to a general aviation county airport. It landed on, then was quickly removed from, the Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund list of the nation's most hazardous sites. Then, when its board inched ahead on a much-delayed project to build new hangars, a rare plant was found in a drainage ditch and blocked the airport's way. "Airport management is not an exercise in instant gratification," said David Almy, Tipton Airport Authority's spokesman and an executive at a Washington aviation trade group.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1999
Talk about a cursed award.Two years ago, Florence Parlett died a few weeks before the Maryland Aviation Administration could give her its Pioneer Award for founding Lee Airport in Edgewater.Last week, Aubrey Patterson nearly followed Parlett's footsteps. The longtime parachute packer had a heart attack just before the awards ceremony and was unable to attend.However, the 81-year-old Glen Burnie resident quickly recovered and spent yesterday afternoon retrieving two more parachutes to be inspected and repacked.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 5, 1998
This year, at age 15 -- even before she got her driver's license -- Blair Stahnke began learning to fly."Someday I'd probably like to be an airline pilot, but right now I want to get my private pilot's license and finish high school," said Stahnke, a Grand Prairie, Texas, high school junior.Women represent a vast resource of potential pilots both for general aviation -- the world of private and business flying -- and the airline industry, which depends on general aviation as a pipeline to supply pilots.
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