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NEWS
April 13, 2010
Congratulations to the state legislature. Once again they have proved that they are a self-serving body pandering to special interest groups. Again this year they have failed to take any useful steps in regard to distracted drivers, drunken drivers, runaway utility costs, illegal aliens, slots, tax relief, medical costs or state government spending. Instead, they chose to pass token legislation that has no teeth, attempting to imply that they actually care about any of these things, when in reality they care only about themselves and their re-election chances.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | October 12, 2014
"[O]ne man appears to be a more eligible dispenser of the mercy of government, than a body of men. " - Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 74 Every politician wants a legacy - an issue or institution that evolves far beyond the official's time in public office. Sometimes, unexpected events intervene and the intended legacy items do not go according to plan. My experience is a good example of such an unplanned legacy. Some of you will recall our administration's steadfast support for charter schools - public schools that enjoy a greater degree of autonomy than the standard public school.
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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | April 9, 2012
Maryland's House of Delegates just passed a bill that doubles the "flush tax" -- a fee on water use -- sending it to Gov. Martin O'Malleyfor his signature. Passing the bill was a key part of the governor's agenda this year. The bill increases the fee from $2.50 per household per month to $5. Funds will be used to upgrade wastewater faciliites. It passed the House 89 to 48. The bill ( HB 446 ) was amended to exclude parts of the state, like Garrett County and parts of the Eastern Shore, that are not part of the Chesapeake Bay watershed.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley has appointed the lawyer who defends the General Assembly to a seat on the state's second highest court. O'Malley on Tuesday appointed Dan Friedman, an assistant attorney general, to the at-large position on Maryland's Court of Special Appeals, a job vacant  since Judge Albert J. Matricciani resigned earlier this year.  Friedman has been the chief architect behind the Maryland's defense of its new ban on the sale of...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The General Assembly fulfilled its state constitutional duty Saturday by wrapping up action on Gov. Martin O'Malley's nearly $39 billion operating budget. Final approval came as the House and Senate approved the agreement rreached by negotiators for the two chambers. The legislature also ratified a deal on a companion measure that would provide $18.5 million to be available for the state's film tax credit -- considered critical in keeping the production of the Netflix television show House of Cards in Maryland.
NEWS
March 3, 2012
Both voter fraud and voter suppression, the subject of recent Sun op-eds and an editorial ("Voter ID laws uphold system's integrity," Feb. 26, and "The phantom menace," Feb. 27), have been addressed by the General Assembly. When an individual's right to vote is challenged at the polls, that person may establish his or her identity by presenting a voter registration card, Social Security card, valid Maryland driver's license, any identification card issued by a government agency, any employee identification card with a photo, or a copy of a current bill, bank statement, or government document that shows the individual's name and current address.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley has appointed the lawyer who defends the General Assembly to a seat on the state's second highest court. O'Malley on Tuesday appointed Dan Friedman, an assistant attorney general, to the at-large position on Maryland's Court of Special Appeals, a job vacant  since Judge Albert J. Matricciani resigned earlier this year.  Friedman has been the chief architect behind the Maryland's defense of its new ban on the sale of...
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
After failing twice to attract a developer to transform the debt-ridden Rocky Gap Lodge into a profit-generating slot machine palace, Maryland lawmakers are considering a new package of financial incentives that would erase millions of dollars in fees and temporarily reduce the state's take of gambling revenue. The 13-year-old complex in Western Maryland includes a hotel with meeting rooms and an 18-hole Jack Nicklaus golf course. But saddled with tens of millions in debt, it has been an annual drag on the state's already challenged balance sheet.
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
The Maryland Senate unanimously approved Friday a major expansion of the state's network of legally protected wildlands. The O'Malley administration bill would create nine new wildlands and expand 14 existing sites already set aside because they harbor rare plants and animals or other natural features. Development, motor vehicles and even bicycles are barred in wildlands, but hiking, hunting, fishing and horseback riding are allowed. The measure now goes to the House. tim.wheeler@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
A General Assembly committee charged with reviewing the behavior of state Sen. Ulysses Currie met briefly Thursday behind closed doors in what was described as an organizational session. Currie, a Prince George's County Democrat recently acquitted of federal bribery charges, did not appear. Del. Brian McHale, co-chairman of the Joint Legislative Committee on Ethics, would not comment except to say the panel's initial meeting focused on organization and procedure. "I'm not going to run the risk of violating what I'm required to protect," said McHale, a Baltimore city Democrat.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
The article, "UM will give up $31 million to end ACC exit fee fight," (Aug. 9), really misses the big point, and that is the corruption in Maryland state government exhibited by President Wallace Loh and the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland in giving away $31 million of taxpayers' money in order to enter the Big Ten. When the announcement regarding the shift from the ACC to the Big Ten was first made public, I immediately filed...
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Baltimore County State Del. Jon S. Cardin, who lost the primary campaign for attorney general, says he was the victim of the "most negative smear campaign in a Democratic Party primary in Maryland's modern history. "  In a Facebook post this week, Cardin, who runs his own law practice, also said he plans to return to private life, after losing last month to Montgomery County State Sen. Brian Frosh. Frosh, whom Cardin calls a "good Democrat" in the post, will face Republican lawyer Jeffrey Pritzker in the general election.  Cardin received criticism during the primary campaign over his misuse of Baltimore police resources during a stunt wedding proposal; missing nearly 75 percent of his committee votes during the 2014 General Assembly session; and touting the endorsement of a Baltimore rapper facing human trafficking charges.  Some of these charges were made in negative mailers funded by labor unions that supported Frosh.  In a Facebook post shortly after the primary, Cardin called the campaign "disgustingly negative.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Atholton High School's Miles Walker recently captured the state's top prize in an American Legion national government instruction program, an accomplishment that for the 16-year-old rising senior was nearly a lifetime in the making. The Columbia resident was an infant when his mother, Lisa Walker Woodyard, first read about the Boys State program in the memoir of President Bill Clinton, who attended as a 16-year-old himself. The regimented instruction program was launched by the American Legion in 1935 to counter the Soviet Union's Young Pioneer camps and according to the American Legion strives to teach civic duty via role playing as state and local politicians.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
In the aftermath of an eight-year court battle, a major change in the way Maryland's justice system operates finally boiled down Tuesday to one simple question. "Would you like to have a court-appointed attorney?" court Commissioner Jennifer Colton asked a heavily tattooed man sitting in her Towson office. Colton is a foot soldier in Maryland's sprawling judicial system, tasked with deciding whether arrested people should be released, required to post bail or held until they see a judge.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
At least six General Assembly incumbents were trailing opponents after early primary returns Tuesday evening — but many incumbents were turning back tough challenges. With early results reported from polls across the state, state Sen. James Brochin, the northern Baltimore County Democrat known for an independent streak, led former Del. Connie DeJuliis, a more progressive candidate backed by Gov. Martin O'Malley. "People like independence, and they like someone who will stand up to the establishment," said Brochin, who's voted against several of the governor's tax increases.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Voters will head to the polls Tuesday to resolve one of the costliest primary fights in Maryland history and nominate scores more politicians for November's general election. With experts forecasting low turnout, candidates were out in force trying Monday to lure voters - long accustomed to September primaries - to cast a ballot in Maryland's first June primary since the Eisenhower administration. "It's really a turnout question in an election like this," said Barbara A. Hoffman, a former state senator and longtime political observer.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Lawyers for the state defended Maryland's new General Assembly districts Wednesday, telling Maryland's highest judges that while the map may not please everyone, it's legal and proper. "Somebody can always draw a better map. That's not the issue," Assistant Attorney General Dan Friedman told the Court of Appeals, as he argued against three challenges to the redistricting map. "The issue is whether this map is constitutional. " Among those challenging the plan are two Democratic state senators from Baltimore County, who asked the judges to throw out the plan created by Gov. Martin O'Malley and General Assembly leaders and tell them to try again.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
At least six General Assembly incumbents were trailing opponents after early primary returns Tuesday evening — but many incumbents were turning back tough challenges. With early results reported from polls across the state, state Sen. James Brochin, the northern Baltimore County Democrat known for an independent streak, led former Del. Connie DeJuliis, a more progressive candidate backed by Gov. Martin O'Malley. "People like independence, and they like someone who will stand up to the establishment," said Brochin, who's voted against several of the governor's tax increases.
NEWS
June 10, 2014
The Sun makes endorsements for state legislature and County Council in the following races: 8th District Redistricting left the residents of the 8th District with two incumbents for three spots. Del. John Cluster, Christian Miele and Norma Secoura are unopposed in the Republican primary, but there is significant competition among the Democrats. Del. Eric Bromwell, though still young at 37, is running for his fourth term in Annapolis, and he has matured as a lawmaker during his time.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
Frederick voters may notice a theme to their primary ballots next month: Young for state senator. Young for county executive. Young for county school board. Young for state delegate. Politics, after all, is the Young family business. "I was driving the other day, and I literally saw all four of their campaign signs on the same corner," said Todd Anderson, a federal contractor who lives in the city of Frederick. "I guess we've got kind of a Kennedy clan here. " The family's dominance in city and county politics is measured in decades.
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