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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 17, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- Genentech Inc., the world's No. 2 biotechnology company, has offered to pay $200 million to settle claims it violated a University of California patent in developing human-growth-hormone drugs, people familiar with the matter said.The proposed settlement comes more than five months after a San Francisco jury fell one vote short of finding that Genentech infringed on UC's patent for the human-growth-hormone drug Protropin. A majority of Genentech is owned by Swiss drugmaker Roche Holding AG.If approved by UC's Board of Regents, the proposed settlement will keep Genentech out of a court battle over two of its best-selling products, the growth hormones Protropin and Nutropin.
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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | August 15, 2008
BETHESDA - Micromet Inc.'s experimental cancer treatment shrank tumors in people with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a study that might lead to a new approach in tackling malignant diseases. The medicine, called blinatumomab, caused complete or partial tumor regression in all seven patients who received the highest dosage in tests by German researchers, according to data published in Science magazine. The findings were first presented at a medical meeting in Switzerland in June. Blinatumomab is a protein that binds immune cells with cancer-fighting properties to tumor cells, releasing toxins that destroy the disease more effectively at the site.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 14, 2008
The biotechnology company, Genentech, as expected, turned down a buyout offer yesterday from its majority owner Roche, saying the bid of $89 a share was far too low. But in a statement, a special committee of Genentech's board said it would consider a higher offer, which some analysts took as suggesting a deal would eventually be done. The committee also approved a "broad-based" employee retention program, an indication that Genentech executives, and Roche executives as well, were worried that employees would leave amid the uncertainty of whether Genentech might lose its status as an independent company.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 14, 2008
The biotechnology company, Genentech, as expected, turned down a buyout offer yesterday from its majority owner Roche, saying the bid of $89 a share was far too low. But in a statement, a special committee of Genentech's board said it would consider a higher offer, which some analysts took as suggesting a deal would eventually be done. The committee also approved a "broad-based" employee retention program, an indication that Genentech executives, and Roche executives as well, were worried that employees would leave amid the uncertainty of whether Genentech might lose its status as an independent company.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 27, 2000
WASHINGTON - Genentech Inc., the world's oldest biotechnology company, was cited by the Food and Drug Administration for quality-control lapses, most related to production of its Pulmozyme drug for cystic fibrosis. The FDA sent the warning letter, dated Dec. 14 and released yesterday, to Dr. Susan Hellman, Genentech's chief medical officer, based on an inspection of company facilities in South San Francisco, Calif., from Aug. 7 to Aug. 24. Genentech used expired material to manufacture Pulmozyme in January, the FDA said in the letter, and failed to obtain approval before distributing two bulk lots of Pulmozyme that had been contaminated and then refiltered.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 22, 2007
California's Genentech Inc. announced yesterday that a patent protecting a key drug-making process in the biotechnology industry has been rejected by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, opening the door for dozens of companies - including Gaithersburg-based MedImmune Inc. - to use the technology without having to pay millions in royalties. MedImmune has long claimed the patent, known as the Cabilly II, is invalid. The company sued Genentech in a case that wound its way up to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled last month that the lawsuit could proceed in lower courts after having been rejected earlier.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 27, 2003
LOS ANGELES - MedImmune Inc. can't pursue antitrust claims in its suit to invalidate a patent controlled by Genentech Inc., the second-largest biotechnology company, for the method to create drugs using antibody molecules to fight diseases. Genentech and Britain's Celltech Group reached a confidential agreement in 2001 to end a dispute over whose scientists first created the method of manufacturing combined human and nonhuman genes. MedImmune sued this year, claiming that the companies are wrongly using the agreement to demand royalties from competitors.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | November 4, 2005
In a decision that could have far-reaching effects on the biotechnology industry and patent enforcement, a federal court has denied an appeal by MedImmune Inc. of Gaithersburg requesting that a competitor's patent be declared "invalid and unenforceable" because it allegedly violates state and national antitrust laws. MedImmune contends that a patent, known as "Cabilly II" and held by Genentech Inc. of San Francisco, was obtained through improper collusion with British biotechnology company Celltech R&D Ltd. and amounts to an illegal 11-year extension of an earlier patent.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | September 24, 1992
Univax Biologics Inc. of Rockville will collaborate with one o the nation's largest biotechnology companies to develop a preventive therapy for people who may have been exposed to the AIDS virus as well as for those already infected.Genentech Inc., a San Francisco company, chose Univax to develop the therapy because of the company's expertise in treatments based on antibodies.Genentech will give Univax a genetically engineered vaccine now being tested on humans. Univax will innoculate healthy, uninfected volunteers whose bodies are expected to produce antibodies to the AIDS virus.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 15, 2006
Doctors are excited about the prospect of Avastin, a drug already widely used for colon cancer, as a crucial new treatment for breast and lung cancer, too. But they are cringing at the price the maker, Genentech, plans to charge for it: about $100,000 a year. That price, about double the current level as a colon cancer treatment, would raise Avastin to an annual cost typically found only for medicines used to treat rare diseases that affect small numbers of patients. But Avastin, already a billion-dollar drug, has a potential patient pool of hundreds of thousands of people - which is why analysts predict its U.S. sales could grow nearly sevenfold to $7 billion by 2009.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 22, 2007
California's Genentech Inc. announced yesterday that a patent protecting a key drug-making process in the biotechnology industry has been rejected by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, opening the door for dozens of companies - including Gaithersburg-based MedImmune Inc. - to use the technology without having to pay millions in royalties. MedImmune has long claimed the patent, known as the Cabilly II, is invalid. The company sued Genentech in a case that wound its way up to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled last month that the lawsuit could proceed in lower courts after having been rejected earlier.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | October 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Compared to the global warming and abortion cases set to go before the U.S. Supreme Court this term, yesterday's arguments in MedImmune Inc. v. Genentech Inc. seem easy to dismiss as insignificant. The case involves two biotechnology companies in a legal spat over a patent. And while that patent protects technology used to manufacture monoclonal antibodies - an increasingly important substance in the drug-making world - it's not the sort of thing discussed in the neighborhood coffeeshop.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A Civil War-era law designed to root out fraudulent Army contracts has been quietly employed by whistleblowers and federal prosecutors in recent years as a powerful tool for cracking down on pharmaceutical companies wrongly promoting their drugs. Companies prosecuted under the federal False Claims Act have paid nearly $3.5 billion in penalties since 2001 for giving doctors televisions, selling them drugs at undisclosed discounts and taking other improper steps to encourage sales.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 15, 2006
Doctors are excited about the prospect of Avastin, a drug already widely used for colon cancer, as a crucial new treatment for breast and lung cancer, too. But they are cringing at the price the maker, Genentech, plans to charge for it: about $100,000 a year. That price, about double the current level as a colon cancer treatment, would raise Avastin to an annual cost typically found only for medicines used to treat rare diseases that affect small numbers of patients. But Avastin, already a billion-dollar drug, has a potential patient pool of hundreds of thousands of people - which is why analysts predict its U.S. sales could grow nearly sevenfold to $7 billion by 2009.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | November 4, 2005
In a decision that could have far-reaching effects on the biotechnology industry and patent enforcement, a federal court has denied an appeal by MedImmune Inc. of Gaithersburg requesting that a competitor's patent be declared "invalid and unenforceable" because it allegedly violates state and national antitrust laws. MedImmune contends that a patent, known as "Cabilly II" and held by Genentech Inc. of San Francisco, was obtained through improper collusion with British biotechnology company Celltech R&D Ltd. and amounts to an illegal 11-year extension of an earlier patent.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2004
Celera Genomics Group said yesterday that it is linking up with Genentech Inc. to develop cancer-killing drugs, the latest in a series of partnerships that Rockville-based Celera is using to reshape its business. "We had to be very careful to .... develop a strategy that would allow us to deliver value to our shareholders and that would carry us as far forward as possible," said Kathy Ordonez, Celera Genomics' president. "We have to look at things very carefully and then make an assessment of what we [hope to achieve]
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 2003
ANAHEIM, Calif. - An experimental drug can slow the loss of vision caused by a maddening eye disease that is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly, researchers have found. But in a large trial, the drug did not meaningfully improve vision, they said. That contradicts previously reported results that had sent patients flocking to eye doctors for what they thought might be a miracle cure. The drug, called Macugen, is intended to treat the wet form of age-related macular degeneration, a disease that can rob people of the ability to read, drive, recognize faces or watch television.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 27, 2003
LOS ANGELES - MedImmune Inc. can't pursue antitrust claims in its suit to invalidate a patent controlled by Genentech Inc., the second-largest biotechnology company, for the method to create drugs using antibody molecules to fight diseases. Genentech and Britain's Celltech Group reached a confidential agreement in 2001 to end a dispute over whose scientists first created the method of manufacturing combined human and nonhuman genes. MedImmune sued this year, claiming that the companies are wrongly using the agreement to demand royalties from competitors.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 2003
ANAHEIM, Calif. - An experimental drug can slow the loss of vision caused by a maddening eye disease that is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly, researchers have found. But in a large trial, the drug did not meaningfully improve vision, they said. That contradicts previously reported results that had sent patients flocking to eye doctors for what they thought might be a miracle cure. The drug, called Macugen, is intended to treat the wet form of age-related macular degeneration, a disease that can rob people of the ability to read, drive, recognize faces or watch television.
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