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By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
To lovers of Wild West folklore, he's Wyatt Earp - lawman, saloonkeeper, gambler, quick-triggered centerpiece of the legendary gunfight at the OK Corral. To Charles Earp Jr. of Catonsville and Pamela Earp Young of Ellicott City, he's cousin Wyatt. That the man who almost single-handedly defines the Wild West would have a couple of relatives in Maryland - and that those relatives would meet by coincidence - is perhaps not as far afield as it might seem. As it turns out, the Earp clan got its start in the United States when Thomas Earp Jr. of Ireland came to the Baltimore area in the 17th century as an indentured servant.
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By Jaclyn Peiser, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Seven artists, whose works span experimental musical instruments and genealogy-inspired sculpture, are the finalists in the 2014 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize. The prize, which provides the winner with a $25,000 fellowship award that will help them further develop and create their work, is named after civic leader Walter Sondheim and his wife, Janet. The artists are: •Lauren Adams, whose paintings, drawings, prints and other works explore power, politics and labor.
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By Vicki Wellford and Vicki Wellford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 1996
A WORKSHOP, "Genealogy for Beginners," will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. tomorrow at the Crofton branch library.The event, sponsored by the Ann Arrundell Chapter of the National Society Colonial Dames XVII Century, will be conducted by James Reep. He will present tips on getting started on genealogy research, including the study of coats of arms.The library is at 1657 Crofton Centre.Information: (410) 222-7915 or (301) 261-3909.New reading projectThe Odenton branch library will celebrate a new reading project with Maryland Public Television during an open house Saturday.
NEWS
December 31, 2013
Festival of trains The B&O Railroad Station Museum's annual Holiday Festival of Trains is on view through Sunday, Jan. 26, at 2711 Maryland Ave. The exhibit includes a multilevel LEGO layout with interactive lights, motors and sounds, a Thomas the Tank G-scale layout, children's push-button layout and an N-scale layout. For hours and information, call 410-461-1945. Ellicott City Senior Center These events take place at the Ellicott City Senior Center, 9401 Frederick Road, 410-313-1421: Genealogy session A genealogy program, "Back to Basics," will be held from 10 a.m. to noon Wednesday, Jan. 8, for those who want to get into genealogy but don't know where to start.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1999
Chris Haley, great-great-great-great-great-grandson of Kunta Kinte, sat at Annapolis City Dock yesterday afternoon, read aloud from his late uncle's acclaimed book "Roots" and extolled the significance of genealogy and family history in the pursuit of self-awareness.But first, he had to clear one hurdle: explain who Kunta Kinte was to his rambunctious audience of 16 Annapolis Elementary School third-graders who yelled, "He played in a movie" when Haley mentioned his ancestor's name."Well, actually, an actor played his part in a movie," Haley said, smiling.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
From a tiny office in his Savage home, P. William Filby works to tell the story of America.An internationally recognized expert on genealogy and immigration, Mr. Filby, 81, has published more than 40 books listing the names and ports of arrival of 4 million American immigrants."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Mary Elizabeth "Becky" Lipp, a homemaker who studied genealogy, died of pneumonia March 24 at the Charlestown Retirement Community. She was 101 and had lived in Govans. She was born Mary Elizabeth Barrett while her mother was traveling on a railroad train in Wilmington, Del. She was raised on a family farm in Fauquier County, Va., and moved to Baltimore as a young woman. She lived with cousins on Abell Avenue and worked nearby at the old Crown Five and Ten Cent Store on Greenmount Avenue in Waverly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Seven artists, whose works span experimental musical instruments and genealogy-inspired sculpture, are the finalists in the 2014 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize. The prize, which provides the winner with a $25,000 fellowship award that will help them further develop and create their work, is named after civic leader Walter Sondheim and his wife, Janet. The artists are: •Lauren Adams, whose paintings, drawings, prints and other works explore power, politics and labor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 7, 2003
Rhonda McClure's great-great-great-grandfather was not a very nice man. It appears that Benjamin Standerfer dabbled in bigamy, persuaded his second wife to sign away her inheritance and abandoned her when she became pregnant, McClure's research shows. Not to mention his stealing some money and skipping town during the Civil War. Standerfer epitomizes the family black sheep. But McClure, an author and lecturer on genealogy, doesn't shy from him or other skeletons lurking in her ancestral closet.
NEWS
November 8, 1992
The name of the Volunteer of the Week in Sunday's Carroll edition was incorrectly reported. Her name is Margaret Price.The Sun regrets the errors.HELEN PRICE of Westminster volunteers at two places, the Carroll County Library and the Historical Society of Carroll County. But her purpose is the same -- to help people trace their family histories using the resources at both locations. She works with residents as well as with people who live elsewhere but come here to do genealogical research.
NEWS
November 2, 2012
Sunday, Nov. 4 'Rent' Silhouette Stages presents Jonathan Larson's Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning musical/rock opera at 3 p.m. at Slayton House Theater, 10400 Cross Fox Lane in Columbia. Tickets are $18; $15 for seniors, students, and military. For tickets and more information, call 410-637-5289 or go to silhouettestages.com . South Asia Culture Cafe The cultures of six South Asian countries will be represented and celebrated at an event sponsored by the Columbia Association and the Howard County Library System from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Miller branch, 9421 Frederick Road in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Mary Elizabeth "Becky" Lipp, a homemaker who studied genealogy, died of pneumonia March 24 at the Charlestown Retirement Community. She was 101 and had lived in Govans. She was born Mary Elizabeth Barrett while her mother was traveling on a railroad train in Wilmington, Del. She was raised on a family farm in Fauquier County, Va., and moved to Baltimore as a young woman. She lived with cousins on Abell Avenue and worked nearby at the old Crown Five and Ten Cent Store on Greenmount Avenue in Waverly.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
No one could predict in 1940 that World War II was destined to become the deadliest conflict in history, so they couldn't foresee how important the data in the 1940 census might become one day. Information about the lives of U.S. citizens, including those who died in World War II, has been locked away for more than seven decades and is about to be unveiled. And the Howard County Genealogical Society is ready to help people access it. The nation was emerging from the Depression in 1940, the same year that President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented third term in office.
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By Diane Pajak | July 27, 2011
If the recent TV program “Who Do You Think You Are?” piques your interest into researching your ancestry, you're not alone. The Family History Center in Ellicott City has seen an increase in the number of people doing just that - helping more than 36 visitors each week. Wanda Franklin, director of the center, shared that there's also an increase in the number of people studying genealogy at Howard Community College, through classes taught by the center's staff. “Doing family history research is like working on a jigsaw puzzle.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to the Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
"It was late in the spring of 1923 and the very popular Anne Arundel County strawberries were running very late. It seemed like the rain would never stop and the sand was being splashed up onto the waiting berries. "Finally, the sun — greeted with mixed emotions — came out in all its glory and beat down on the Maryland hillside. Mixed emotions because now, acres and acres of strawberries would ripen suddenly, needing to be picked, packed, and shipped to Baltimore quickly or the entire spring cash crop would be lost … perhaps a call to a Baltimore agent would yield some help.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 8, 2010
Bernard John "Jack" Medairy Jr., a retired Baltimore County lawyer and former member of the Maryland legislature who wrote a history of his family, died Friday of heart failure at his Rodgers Forge home. He was 89. Mr. Medairy, the son of a lawyer and an educator, was born in Baltimore and raised in Charles Village. He attended Polytechnic Institute for three years and graduated in 1940 from City College. In 1941, he was working as a hull draftsman for the shipbuilding and repair division of Bethlehem Steel Corp.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | December 28, 2009
To 5-year-old Sara Scherlinder of Washington, Kwanzaa means some really cool pink and yellow face paint. But 13-year-old Joey Davis of Catonsville found a somewhat deeper meaning in the holiday that he said was created so people would "learn to respect your culture." Clearly, the festival means different things to different people. But most all who participated Sunday in the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture's annual Kwanzaa celebration might have to agree that Kwanzaa is fun. Sara and Joey came with their families to the museum on what was Day 2 of the weeklong festival.
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