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By Stephen Wigler | July 30, 1991
You don't need "Another You," the latest Gene Wilder-Richard Pryor vehicle to self-destruct before take-off. This movie brings new meaning to the word meaninglessness: It is simultaneously predictable and improbable.Wilder plays George Washington, a pathological liar who's just been released from a mental institution in an Abe Lincoln stovepipe hat that signifies his hard-won honesty. Pryor plays Eddie Dash, a small-time con man on parole whose assigned community service duty is to help George adjust to non-institutional life.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2005
The Producers is like a bustling Al Hirschfeld cartoon of the Great White Way brought to uproarious and untidy life. Mel Brooks' musical-comedy expansion of his 1968 cult farce about producers who think they can make more money with a flop than with a hit comes to the screen as a loving burlesque caricature of Broadway. The original picture, starring Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder, was a debut film that put its writer-director on the map. This movie can't compete with that one's raw energy.
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By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 13, 1992
Gene Wilder, who was married to the late Gilda Radner, is setting up an annual tennis tournament to benefit "Gilda's Club," a free support group on the East Coast for cancer patients. Forming such a group was one of Radner's last wishes.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | December 20, 1994
Color it another slow night, the highlight of which is a rerun of a "Frasier" Christmas episode that already has earned "classic" status.* "Prelude to a Kiss" (8-10 p.m., Channel 45) -- The funniest thing about Fox's on-air promos regarding its "world TV premiere" of this 1992 drama -- and there were tons of promos during Fox's football games over the weekend -- is that it makes no mention at all of the seminal supernatural event behind this particular "Kiss." Instead, Fox has promoted it to its audience as your everyday Meg Ryan-Alec Baldwin romance movie -- which it certainly is not. Fox.* "Something Wilder" (8:30-9 p.m., Channel 2)
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By Lou Cedrone | September 24, 1990
YOU SHOULD know, before you consider seeing ''Funny About Love,'' that this is a drama with more than a -- of comedy. The presence of Gene Wilder in the cast might lead you to believe that it's all comedy.In large part, it is an interesting, diverting film. The opening scenes are quite good. In these, a cartoonist, played by Wilder, meets a caterer, played by Christine Lahti.It's always reassuring to know that Lahti is in the cast of any film. But there are some troublesome scenes early in the movie that she and Wilder must go through before we get to the better part of the movie.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 1, 1994
Either the seasons are getting longer, or the patience of network executives is getting shorter. A new fall series will premiere tonight, but others already have been yanked from the schedule. Tonight's new addition: NBC's "Something Wilder," starring Gene Wilder.* "Something Wilder" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 2) -- Gene Wilder and Hillary B. Smith play husband and wife, with typical TV-adorable twins, in this new sitcom that has gotten pasted by advance reviews. It's not actually that horrible -- like most of the new series this fall, it's relentlessly average -- but the laugh track on this particular series, turned up about 30 notches too high, makes "Something Wilder" virtually unbearable.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | July 30, 1991
It's hard to resist calling "Another You" "Another Bomb."The film, starring Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor, plays like an unsuccessful remake of an unsuccessful French comedy. It's that bad.Somewhere through the unwinding of this curiosity, one of the characters asks, ''Will somebody please tell me what is going on?'' It's a fair question. The film is on hour old before we get any plot. Before that, all we know is that George, played by Wilder, is a pathological liar who has been confined to an institution, and that Eddie Dash, played by Pryor, is a con man who has talked his way out of jail by agreeing to do community service.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 24, 1990
If I didn't know better, I'd suspect some crusty big Republican money was in "Funny About Love." It's that dirty a trick -- but I don't think the Republicans are clever enough anymore.It's about a liberal icon, a prize-winning political cartoonist, the conscience of his generation, as played by Gene Wilder. He's sensitive, gutty, forthright, enviro-correct, caring, nurturing, decent, honest. He's Herblock with sex appeal and a wardrobe. At least the movie thinks he is.But in fact it turns the whole proud cavalcade of liberalism on its back to die twitching in the sun, as well as depicting "male sensitivity" at such a sanctimonious, hypocritical pitch that it makes you want to beat a child.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 1, 1994
"Something Wilder" will probably raise a chuckle or two, but only from people who are fascinated by discussions of preschool.The rest of America will likely channel surf in and out, never to return to the NBC sitcom, which premieres at 8 tonight on WMAR (Channel 2) opposite the mighty "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman." The series stars the fiftyish Gene Wilder ("Young Frankenstein") as Gene Bergman, a late-in-life father to 4-year-old twins. His wife, Annie (Hillary B. Smith from "One Life to Live")
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | December 20, 1994
Color it another slow night, the highlight of which is a rerun of a "Frasier" Christmas episode that already has earned "classic" status.* "Prelude to a Kiss" (8-10 p.m., Channel 45) -- The funniest thing about Fox's on-air promos regarding its "world TV premiere" of this 1992 drama -- and there were tons of promos during Fox's football games over the weekend -- is that it makes no mention at all of the seminal supernatural event behind this particular "Kiss." Instead, Fox has promoted it to its audience as your everyday Meg Ryan-Alec Baldwin romance movie -- which it certainly is not. Fox.* "Something Wilder" (8:30-9 p.m., Channel 2)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 1, 1994
"Something Wilder" will probably raise a chuckle or two, but only from people who are fascinated by discussions of preschool.The rest of America will likely channel surf in and out, never to return to the NBC sitcom, which premieres at 8 tonight on WMAR (Channel 2) opposite the mighty "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman." The series stars the fiftyish Gene Wilder ("Young Frankenstein") as Gene Bergman, a late-in-life father to 4-year-old twins. His wife, Annie (Hillary B. Smith from "One Life to Live")
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 1, 1994
Either the seasons are getting longer, or the patience of network executives is getting shorter. A new fall series will premiere tonight, but others already have been yanked from the schedule. Tonight's new addition: NBC's "Something Wilder," starring Gene Wilder.* "Something Wilder" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 2) -- Gene Wilder and Hillary B. Smith play husband and wife, with typical TV-adorable twins, in this new sitcom that has gotten pasted by advance reviews. It's not actually that horrible -- like most of the new series this fall, it's relentlessly average -- but the laugh track on this particular series, turned up about 30 notches too high, makes "Something Wilder" virtually unbearable.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 13, 1992
Gene Wilder, who was married to the late Gilda Radner, is setting up an annual tennis tournament to benefit "Gilda's Club," a free support group on the East Coast for cancer patients. Forming such a group was one of Radner's last wishes.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | July 30, 1991
It's hard to resist calling "Another You" "Another Bomb."The film, starring Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor, plays like an unsuccessful remake of an unsuccessful French comedy. It's that bad.Somewhere through the unwinding of this curiosity, one of the characters asks, ''Will somebody please tell me what is going on?'' It's a fair question. The film is on hour old before we get any plot. Before that, all we know is that George, played by Wilder, is a pathological liar who has been confined to an institution, and that Eddie Dash, played by Pryor, is a con man who has talked his way out of jail by agreeing to do community service.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | July 30, 1991
You don't need "Another You," the latest Gene Wilder-Richard Pryor vehicle to self-destruct before take-off. This movie brings new meaning to the word meaninglessness: It is simultaneously predictable and improbable.Wilder plays George Washington, a pathological liar who's just been released from a mental institution in an Abe Lincoln stovepipe hat that signifies his hard-won honesty. Pryor plays Eddie Dash, a small-time con man on parole whose assigned community service duty is to help George adjust to non-institutional life.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 24, 1990
If I didn't know better, I'd suspect some crusty big Republican money was in "Funny About Love." It's that dirty a trick -- but I don't think the Republicans are clever enough anymore.It's about a liberal icon, a prize-winning political cartoonist, the conscience of his generation, as played by Gene Wilder. He's sensitive, gutty, forthright, enviro-correct, caring, nurturing, decent, honest. He's Herblock with sex appeal and a wardrobe. At least the movie thinks he is.But in fact it turns the whole proud cavalcade of liberalism on its back to die twitching in the sun, as well as depicting "male sensitivity" at such a sanctimonious, hypocritical pitch that it makes you want to beat a child.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2005
The Producers is like a bustling Al Hirschfeld cartoon of the Great White Way brought to uproarious and untidy life. Mel Brooks' musical-comedy expansion of his 1968 cult farce about producers who think they can make more money with a flop than with a hit comes to the screen as a loving burlesque caricature of Broadway. The original picture, starring Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder, was a debut film that put its writer-director on the map. This movie can't compete with that one's raw energy.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 20, 1990
* ''Funny About Love'' Gene Wilder is a cartoonist who falls in love with a caterer, divorces her then tries to win her back. Christine Lahti co-stars. A drama with comedy.* ''GoodFellas'' Martin Scorsese's film version of Nicholas Pileggi's ''Wiseguy'' is the story of a boy who dreamed of being part of the mob and saw that dream come true. A drama with comedy. Robert De Niro and Ray Liotta star.* ''Narrow Margin'' Gene Hackman is a district attorney who has to protect a federal witness from professional killers.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 24, 1990
YOU SHOULD know, before you consider seeing ''Funny About Love,'' that this is a drama with more than a -- of comedy. The presence of Gene Wilder in the cast might lead you to believe that it's all comedy.In large part, it is an interesting, diverting film. The opening scenes are quite good. In these, a cartoonist, played by Wilder, meets a caterer, played by Christine Lahti.It's always reassuring to know that Lahti is in the cast of any film. But there are some troublesome scenes early in the movie that she and Wilder must go through before we get to the better part of the movie.
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