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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 1999
Gene Siskel, the thinner, more cerebral half of the popular Siskel & Ebert team of dueling movie reviewers, died yesterday at a hospital near his home in Chicago, two weeks after leaving the long-running syndicated television program for further recuperation from brain surgery in May.Mr. Siskel, age 53, and and his partner, Roger Ebert, had made their signature thumbs up -- or thumbs down -- a powerful influence over a movie's success or failure.Until Mr. Siskel, the movie reviewer for the Chicago Tribune, and Mr. Ebert, the critic for the Chicago Sun-Times, were paired for a local public television program, "Opening Soon at a Theater Near You," in 1969, film critics had little sway over a movie's fate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Rhodes and Steve Rhodes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 1999
CHICAGO -- The balcony is still open.Five months after Gene Siskel's death, Roger Ebert continues to give the thumbs-up and thumbs-down from the faux movie perch he shared with his film-critic partner for 24 years. Each week he still tapes "Siskel & Ebert," but now with a rotating set of guest critics. He continues to crank out numerous reviews and feature stories for the Chicago Sun-Times, to publish books and host film festivals. Washington Post critic Tom Shales, who was "Siskel & Ebert's" first guest critic when Siskel fell ill with brain cancer, describes Ebert as "possessed."
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1999
Gene Siskel was not the most respected of American movie critics; he wasn't even the most accomplished half of "Siskel & Ebert" -- after all, Roger was the one with the Pulitzer Prize.But Siskel had an intense love for movies, a passion that made him as much fan as critic. He once owned the suit John Travolta wore in "Saturday Night Fever" and, for a wedding present, gave colleague Ebert Harpo Marx's horn. And his opinions were neither lowbrow nor high; if his yearly best-film picks included such critical darlings as 1997's "The Ice Storm," 1988's "The Last Temptation of Christ" and 1975's "Nashville," he was just as sincere in defending his pick for 1998, the box-office dud (and critically ignored)
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1999
Gene Siskel was not the most respected of American movie critics; he wasn't even the most accomplished half of "Siskel & Ebert" -- after all, Roger was the one with the Pulitzer Prize.But Siskel had an intense love for movies, a passion that made him as much fan as critic. He once owned the suit John Travolta wore in "Saturday Night Fever" and, for a wedding present, gave colleague Ebert Harpo Marx's horn. And his opinions were neither lowbrow nor high; if his yearly best-film picks included such critical darlings as 1997's "The Ice Storm," 1988's "The Last Temptation of Christ" and 1975's "Nashville," he was just as sincere in defending his pick for 1998, the box-office dud (and critically ignored)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Rhodes and Steve Rhodes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 1999
CHICAGO -- The balcony is still open.Five months after Gene Siskel's death, Roger Ebert continues to give the thumbs-up and thumbs-down from the faux movie perch he shared with his film-critic partner for 24 years. Each week he still tapes "Siskel & Ebert," but now with a rotating set of guest critics. He continues to crank out numerous reviews and feature stories for the Chicago Sun-Times, to publish books and host film festivals. Washington Post critic Tom Shales, who was "Siskel & Ebert's" first guest critic when Siskel fell ill with brain cancer, describes Ebert as "possessed."
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 4, 2013
Rogert Ebert, the Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic who died today, leaves behind a rich legacy, thanks to a shelf-full of books that explore movies -- and his own life. His memoir, "Life Itself," dealt with his battle with alcoholism and the later, losing fight with thyroid cancer. He recounts, as well, his love for -- and exhaustive knowledge of -- movies. I came to admire Ebert, who worked at the Chicago Sun-Times, as he reviewed movies with fellow critic Gene Siskel on their PBS show.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | November 6, 1993
Prime time is pretty much of a washout on broadcast TV, but there's a daytime news special well worth watching -- as well as some noteworthy pay-per-view offerings.* "Kids in the Crossfire: Violence in America" (11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- VCR Alert: Peter Jennings hosts and moderates this live "ABC News Special," broadcast from Washington, and seeking feedback from young people about this key issue. It's the fifth such special Mr. Jennings and company have produced, and, if it's like the others, adults should tune in, too. ABC.* "Cafe Americain" (8:30-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1997
The King assassination takes center stage on ABC tonight."Friends" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Monica (Courteney Cox) runs into ex-boyfriend Richard (Tom Selleck) at the video store. Can passion be renewed? (If you saw this episode when it first aired back in January, don't spoil it for everyone else by giving away the ending.) NBC."Charlie Rose" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Cal Ripken Jr. sits down for a chat about things Baltimore, things baseball and things literate.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 5, 1994
"An 'E.T.' kind of hit it's not, but then nothing ever is," says John Waters of the commercial fate of "Serial Mom."The movie, which opened nationally April 15, is performing solidly, though it has dropped out of the top 10 list as recorded by most national publications.But, says Waters, "You can have the No. 1 picture in the country, and be a flop. The key figures aren't how much you make in a single week but what your per-screen average is and whether or not you lose theaters. Our per-screen is solid and we're still in the same number of theaters as when we opened."
NEWS
By Julia Gorin | March 15, 1998
I'VE been tempted toward bulimia many times. That's because, like many other women, I take my cues from Hollywood. But with Kate Winslet in "Titanic," Hollywood is finally giving a beauty with an imperfect body a prominent role -- a romantic lead. And now she has been nominated for a best actress Oscar.But poor Kate! Just when she thought she was making the movie that would catapult her to stardom's greatest heights, all that people could talk about was how fat she looked.Review after review of "Titanic" was consumed by rantings of the zaftig redhead's moon-pie face and ballooning curves.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 1999
Gene Siskel, the thinner, more cerebral half of the popular Siskel & Ebert team of dueling movie reviewers, died yesterday at a hospital near his home in Chicago, two weeks after leaving the long-running syndicated television program for further recuperation from brain surgery in May.Mr. Siskel, age 53, and and his partner, Roger Ebert, had made their signature thumbs up -- or thumbs down -- a powerful influence over a movie's success or failure.Until Mr. Siskel, the movie reviewer for the Chicago Tribune, and Mr. Ebert, the critic for the Chicago Sun-Times, were paired for a local public television program, "Opening Soon at a Theater Near You," in 1969, film critics had little sway over a movie's fate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 18, 1994
"Naked Gun 33 1/3 : The Final Insult" is stupider and meaner than the first two films in the very funny series, and it's also shorter. When you walk out, you think: "That was a pretty long trailer. I wonder what the movie will be like."Does all this bespeak a certain creative exhaustion? Ennui, anyone? Lethargy, sloth, lassitude, decrepitude, obsolescence? Let's put it this way: When you're reduced to yanking the wig off Pia Zadora's head for laughs, it's a pretty good bet Oscar Wilde isn't your screenwriter.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 16, 1995
International intrigue, congressional intervention, lost friendships, behind-the-scenes back-stabbing. Sounds right off the set of "All My Children," right?Wrong, but only if you haven't been paying attention to all the drama that has come to figure skating these days.For instance, the only things missing from the tale Jimmy Roberts will tell from the United States Figure Skating Championships Saturday during ABC's "Wide World of Sports" (Channel 2, 4:30 p.m.) are "Erica Kane," organ music and the dangling Friday plot twist that makes you tune in on Monday.
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