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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
Wilbur Morton Baron, who danced professionally with his identical twin brother and later ran a theatrical curtain business, died of pneumonia April 30 at Northwest Hospital Center. The Pikesville resident was 87. Part of an act known as the Baron Twins, he and his brother began dancing to help earn money for the family during the Great Depression. A talent scout recruited them for a Broadway show, and they were choreographed by a young Gene Kelly. Born in Youngstown, Ohio, he was the son of a tailor who moved his family to Baltimore in 1929.
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By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
After starting with Cole Porter's classic "Anything Goes," then moving to the hilariously horny puppets of "Avenue Q," Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre closes its diverse 2012 season with "Xanadu," the 1980 film disaster converted into a 2007 Broadway roller disco hit. This summer's productions offered something for every taste, from classic Broadway to weird coming-of-age to the absurdity of a Greek muse turned Australian roller girl banished from...
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1996
No man was responsible for more great movie musicals than the late Gene Kelly. Tonight, Turner Classic Movies offers the proof. Watch, and enjoy.* "The X-Files" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- In this first of a two-parter, Nick Lea returns as Alex Krycek, an out-of-control agent who killed Mulder's father. Also, divers salvaging a downed World War II fighter plane suffer radiation burns. Not a good sign. Fox.* "Hangin' With Mr. Cooper" (9:30 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- The Harlem Globetrotters show up to try to give this series' ratings a little artificial respiration.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
Wilbur Morton Baron, who danced professionally with his identical twin brother and later ran a theatrical curtain business, died of pneumonia April 30 at Northwest Hospital Center. The Pikesville resident was 87. Part of an act known as the Baron Twins, he and his brother began dancing to help earn money for the family during the Great Depression. A talent scout recruited them for a Broadway show, and they were choreographed by a young Gene Kelly. Born in Youngstown, Ohio, he was the son of a tailor who moved his family to Baltimore in 1929.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | February 2, 1994
Life precedes art: Last week Michael Moriarty, who plays a district attorney on NBC's "Law & Order," handed in his resignation from that series. Tonight on that series, Claire Kincaid (played by Jill Hennessy), another district attorney on "Law & Order," hands in her resignation as part of the plot.* "The Critic" (8:30-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- For obvious reasons, I enjoy this new animated series a great deal. Aside from the overweight and balding parts, "The Critic" gets a lot of it right -- including my favorite little subtle touch, the fact that critic Jay Sherman (voiced by Jon Lovitz)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | October 27, 2007
William Baron and Wilbur Baron -- who were billed as the tap-dancing Baron Twins -- were 8-year-olds when they first glided across the Hippodrome Theatre stage performing their signature six-minute mirror dance in 1930. Now 85, and inseparable as ever, they live around the corner from each other in Pikesville. "We have our aches and pains, but we see each other and socialize as often as possible," said Wilbur, who quickly points out his twin is "10 minutes older than me." They were born in Youngstown, Ohio, the sons of a tailor who later moved his family to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 21, 2009
Series Cops:: In the 750th episode, Florida officers catch a pair of suspects siphoning gasoline from a car and find out they've been doing cocaine, while in Washington state, police use a helicopter to search for a guy who threatened to kill his girlfriend. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) Movies Plainsong: : This 2004 Hallmark Hall of Fame version of Kent Haruf's novel stars Aidan Quinn as a Colorado teacher who raises his two sons alone after his wife leaves him. (9 p.m., Hallmark) Knocked Up:: Seth Rogen stars as a party animal whose one-night stand with a TV journalist (Katherine Heigl)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1998
Talk about starting off at the top.Stanley Donen, at the ripe old age of 26, not only had nine years of film work behind him, but he had just finished directing a film praised as one of the greatest movie musicals of all time, "Singin' In the Rain."Must have been a pretty heady feeling, no?Not especially. "You don't think of it at the time," says Donen, 74, who went on to direct a good half-dozen classics, both musicals and non-musicals. "You're just working."Maybe. But to film lovers, Donen's career is "just work" in the same sense that Einstein's was "just science" or Picasso's was "just painting."
NEWS
March 20, 2000
Fred Kelly, 83, a three-time Tony Award winner and dance instructor who taught his elder brother Gene Kelly how to tap dance, died of cancer Wednesday in Tucson, Ariz. He also taught Queen Elizabeth how to dance and showed John Travolta how to strut. In 1940, he won three Tony awards for his lead performance in "Time of Your Life." Even after entering the military during World War II, he didn't stray far from the dance floor. He was called to Buckingham Palace in 1944 to teach Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret to dance.
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It's amazing that one piece of music can extract such different reactions from choreographers.Though not a household word like his "Rhapsody in Blue," George Gershwin's Piano Concerto in F (1925) is familiar territory to most Americans and has been set at least four times as a ballet.Gene Kelly (yes, that Gene Kelly) called it "Pas de dieux" for the Paris Opera Ballet in 1960; and John Clifford -- who is currently working with students at Goucher College -- made a version for the Deutsche Oper Ballet in 1972.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 21, 2009
Series Cops:: In the 750th episode, Florida officers catch a pair of suspects siphoning gasoline from a car and find out they've been doing cocaine, while in Washington state, police use a helicopter to search for a guy who threatened to kill his girlfriend. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) Movies Plainsong: : This 2004 Hallmark Hall of Fame version of Kent Haruf's novel stars Aidan Quinn as a Colorado teacher who raises his two sons alone after his wife leaves him. (9 p.m., Hallmark) Knocked Up:: Seth Rogen stars as a party animal whose one-night stand with a TV journalist (Katherine Heigl)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | October 27, 2007
William Baron and Wilbur Baron -- who were billed as the tap-dancing Baron Twins -- were 8-year-olds when they first glided across the Hippodrome Theatre stage performing their signature six-minute mirror dance in 1930. Now 85, and inseparable as ever, they live around the corner from each other in Pikesville. "We have our aches and pains, but we see each other and socialize as often as possible," said Wilbur, who quickly points out his twin is "10 minutes older than me." They were born in Youngstown, Ohio, the sons of a tailor who later moved his family to Baltimore.
NEWS
By BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF | July 18, 2005
Absolute Power (1997) Clint Eastwood stars as the sensitive thief who can save the entire American political system from complete corruption. Too bad he wasn't around during the Reagan administration. Eastwood discovers presidential corruption during his final heist before being arrested, but not before he and Gene Hackman appear in several sites around Baltimore. The Towson Court House doubles as the site of a presidential press conference, Brooklandville's Maryvale Prep is the mansion, and Eastwood shows the thief's artsy side while sketching at the Walters' Art Gallery.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 7, 2001
You'd think the first reason to remake The Three Musketeers would be to introduce a dashing new D'Artagnan - an actor-athlete on the level of Douglas Fairbanks Sr. or Gene Kelly, who brought humor and panache to stunts and swordplay. Unfortunately, aside from his swashbuckling duds, Justin Chambers as D'Artagnan in The Musketeer still appears to be the cool American WASP he played in Barry Levinson's Liberty Heights. There's no electricity in his body and no joy in his face - that is, when you can see his face.
NEWS
March 20, 2000
Fred Kelly, 83, a three-time Tony Award winner and dance instructor who taught his elder brother Gene Kelly how to tap dance, died of cancer Wednesday in Tucson, Ariz. He also taught Queen Elizabeth how to dance and showed John Travolta how to strut. In 1940, he won three Tony awards for his lead performance in "Time of Your Life." Even after entering the military during World War II, he didn't stray far from the dance floor. He was called to Buckingham Palace in 1944 to teach Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret to dance.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1999
Cyd Charisse as Greta Garbo?Not that Charisse was ever actually asked to play the legendary Swedish actress who so craved to be alone. But she did get to play one of Garbo's most famous roles in 1957, when the musical version of "Ninotchka" was filmed as "Silk Stockings."The result, which Charisse says is one of her favorite films -- since she got to dance opposite Fred Astaire, accompanied by Cole Porter's music, it's no wonder -- is being screened at the Senator Thursday.And in a real treat for local film buffs (as if seeing Astaire and Charisse on the big screen isn't treat enough)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 7, 2001
You'd think the first reason to remake The Three Musketeers would be to introduce a dashing new D'Artagnan - an actor-athlete on the level of Douglas Fairbanks Sr. or Gene Kelly, who brought humor and panache to stunts and swordplay. Unfortunately, aside from his swashbuckling duds, Justin Chambers as D'Artagnan in The Musketeer still appears to be the cool American WASP he played in Barry Levinson's Liberty Heights. There's no electricity in his body and no joy in his face - that is, when you can see his face.
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