Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGene Autry
IN THE NEWS

Gene Autry

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 1998
GENE AUTRY, Okla. -- There is the Gene Autry Chamber of Commerce, and there is the Gene Autry Volunteer Fire Department. The Gene Autry Methodist Church and the Gene Autry Baptist Church. Since 1941, when this dot-on-a-map town in southern Oklahoma renamed itself to honor one of America's first singing cowboys, only one important element has been missing:Gene Autry himself.At a rousing ceremony nearly six decades ago, Autry, then a dashing and beloved 34-year-old radio personality and movie star, spoke of bringing recognition to this small railroad community then called Berwyn.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | August 6, 2000
"Hillbilly Hollywood: The Origins of Country and Western Stye," by Debby Bull (Rizzoli, 128 pages, $39.95), illustrated If you detest everything conjured up by the term "country and western" you will adore this devastatingly visual send-up. But make no mistake: It's almost spiritually respectful of the excesses and outrages of the singers and other performers who were drawn by the hope of glory and riches from Depression era rural outposts to Los Angeles. Some of the characters -- Gene Autry, Roy Rogers -- are known well even today.
Advertisement
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 29, 1998
LAST YEAR, it was an albino slug, reported exclusively right here in this space (TJI, Aug. 29, 1997). This year, it's -- are you sitting down? -- an albino groundhog. Wait. Check that. Make it three, albino groundhogs. The white woodchucks of White Hall! Marmota monax albus.(Stay with me on this one, folks. It's a scoop, I tell ya, a scoop!)I saw two of the melanin-deficient rodents with my own eyes yesterday morning in the lovely rear yard of Mr. Gene Stiffler's home in White Hall, northern Baltimore County, not far from Little Falls.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 1998
GENE AUTRY, Okla. -- There is the Gene Autry Chamber of Commerce, and there is the Gene Autry Volunteer Fire Department. The Gene Autry Methodist Church and the Gene Autry Baptist Church. Since 1941, when this dot-on-a-map town in southern Oklahoma renamed itself to honor one of America's first singing cowboys, only one important element has been missing:Gene Autry himself.At a rousing ceremony nearly six decades ago, Autry, then a dashing and beloved 34-year-old radio personality and movie star, spoke of bringing recognition to this small railroad community then called Berwyn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | August 6, 2000
"Hillbilly Hollywood: The Origins of Country and Western Stye," by Debby Bull (Rizzoli, 128 pages, $39.95), illustrated If you detest everything conjured up by the term "country and western" you will adore this devastatingly visual send-up. But make no mistake: It's almost spiritually respectful of the excesses and outrages of the singers and other performers who were drawn by the hope of glory and riches from Depression era rural outposts to Los Angeles. Some of the characters -- Gene Autry, Roy Rogers -- are known well even today.
NEWS
January 9, 1994
* Pat Buttram, 78, singing cowboy Gene Autry's sidekick in the 1950s and the annoying Mr. Haney on the sitcom "Green Acres," died yesterday of kidney failure at the University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, according to radio executive Bill Ward, a longtime friend. From 1965 to 1971 Mr. Buttram played Mr. Haney on CBS' "Green Acres." Mr. Haney was the irritating country con man who sold a tumbledown farm to Oliver Wendell Douglas (Eddie Albert) and Lisa Douglas (Eva Gabor). Playing under his own name on "The Gene Autry Show" from 1950 to 1956 on CBS-TV, Mr. Buttram helped Mr. Autry and his horse, Champion, keep peace out West.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | December 7, 1992
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- The California Angels pulled off a major trade last night, but they may have further alienated a dwindling fan following when they sent popular left-hander Jim Abbott to the New York Yankees for three of that club's top young prospects.The deal added promising pitchers Jerry Nielsen and Russ Springer and first baseman J. T. Snow to a rebuilding Angels club that recently lost outfielder Junior Felix and relief stopper Bryan Harvey in the November expansion draft.It makes perfect sense for an organization that is starting froscratch, but it probably won't make sense to fans of one of the most inspiring players in the history of the game.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | May 11, 1994
Back in the 1930s and 1940s, many a young boy's heroes were the likes of Gene Autry and Roy Rogers.Country music was Roy Acuff, Bill Monroe, and Lester Flat and Earl Scruggs.About this time, a little boy was growing up in Upperco who idolized Autry and Rogers."I wanted to be a singing cowboy," acknowledged Arthur Nash, now of Hampstead and 71 years old. "I did do a lot of singing until I was 28 -- I could yodel and I sang Gene Autry songs."Then I had to have my tonsils out and that destroyed my capability to have a decent singing voice.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | February 5, 1993
Frank Robinson long has been outspoken on the topic of race and baseball, and, a day after the major leagues punished Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott for racial slurs, he remained so.Robinson, Orioles assistant general manager and the majors' first black manager, says that baseball's bigotry goes beyond Schott. He remains skeptical of the effort to increase minority hiring in front-office jobs, and says there is no shortage of black candidates for general manager spots. However, Robinson says baseball is halting further progress by keeping minorities out of minor-league managing, thus clogging a pipeline to jobs in the majors.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | February 25, 1997
BALTIMOREANS ARE fickle about restaurants. Survivors are few; among them: Marconi's, (since 1928), House of Welsh (1900), Haussner's (1926), Velleggia's (1934). But history is rich with the memory of restaurants that in their time were a part of who we were and the way we lived.Miller Brothers was on the south side of Fayette Street between Charles and Liberty Street. It seated 450 on one floor, and was famous for green turtle soup and for elk, buffalo and whale steaks. Most people ordered without looking at the menu; it never changed.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 29, 1998
LAST YEAR, it was an albino slug, reported exclusively right here in this space (TJI, Aug. 29, 1997). This year, it's -- are you sitting down? -- an albino groundhog. Wait. Check that. Make it three, albino groundhogs. The white woodchucks of White Hall! Marmota monax albus.(Stay with me on this one, folks. It's a scoop, I tell ya, a scoop!)I saw two of the melanin-deficient rodents with my own eyes yesterday morning in the lovely rear yard of Mr. Gene Stiffler's home in White Hall, northern Baltimore County, not far from Little Falls.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | February 25, 1997
BALTIMOREANS ARE fickle about restaurants. Survivors are few; among them: Marconi's, (since 1928), House of Welsh (1900), Haussner's (1926), Velleggia's (1934). But history is rich with the memory of restaurants that in their time were a part of who we were and the way we lived.Miller Brothers was on the south side of Fayette Street between Charles and Liberty Street. It seated 450 on one floor, and was famous for green turtle soup and for elk, buffalo and whale steaks. Most people ordered without looking at the menu; it never changed.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | May 11, 1994
Back in the 1930s and 1940s, many a young boy's heroes were the likes of Gene Autry and Roy Rogers.Country music was Roy Acuff, Bill Monroe, and Lester Flat and Earl Scruggs.About this time, a little boy was growing up in Upperco who idolized Autry and Rogers."I wanted to be a singing cowboy," acknowledged Arthur Nash, now of Hampstead and 71 years old. "I did do a lot of singing until I was 28 -- I could yodel and I sang Gene Autry songs."Then I had to have my tonsils out and that destroyed my capability to have a decent singing voice.
NEWS
January 9, 1994
* Pat Buttram, 78, singing cowboy Gene Autry's sidekick in the 1950s and the annoying Mr. Haney on the sitcom "Green Acres," died yesterday of kidney failure at the University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, according to radio executive Bill Ward, a longtime friend. From 1965 to 1971 Mr. Buttram played Mr. Haney on CBS' "Green Acres." Mr. Haney was the irritating country con man who sold a tumbledown farm to Oliver Wendell Douglas (Eddie Albert) and Lisa Douglas (Eva Gabor). Playing under his own name on "The Gene Autry Show" from 1950 to 1956 on CBS-TV, Mr. Buttram helped Mr. Autry and his horse, Champion, keep peace out West.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | February 5, 1993
Frank Robinson long has been outspoken on the topic of race and baseball, and, a day after the major leagues punished Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott for racial slurs, he remained so.Robinson, Orioles assistant general manager and the majors' first black manager, says that baseball's bigotry goes beyond Schott. He remains skeptical of the effort to increase minority hiring in front-office jobs, and says there is no shortage of black candidates for general manager spots. However, Robinson says baseball is halting further progress by keeping minorities out of minor-league managing, thus clogging a pipeline to jobs in the majors.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | December 7, 1992
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- The California Angels pulled off a major trade last night, but they may have further alienated a dwindling fan following when they sent popular left-hander Jim Abbott to the New York Yankees for three of that club's top young prospects.The deal added promising pitchers Jerry Nielsen and Russ Springer and first baseman J. T. Snow to a rebuilding Angels club that recently lost outfielder Junior Felix and relief stopper Bryan Harvey in the November expansion draft.It makes perfect sense for an organization that is starting froscratch, but it probably won't make sense to fans of one of the most inspiring players in the history of the game.
SPORTS
April 4, 1996
Angels: The Anaheim City Council voted 3-2 yesterday to approve a memorandum of agreement with the Walt Disney Co. for a 33-year lease of Anaheim Stadium, with Disney retaining a 20-year bailout option. The club will be called the Anaheim Angels next season, and in three years they will be playing in a renovated, state-of-the-art stadium. The club will remain in Anaheim for at least two more decades, and more likely 33 years or beyond. Immediately, Disney announced that it has renewed an agreement to buy a minority interest in the California Angels from Gene Autry and his wife, Jackie, and take over operational control of the American League team.
SPORTS
April 3, 1998
Quote: "I commented on a pitch and I guess he didn't like the way I commented on it." -- Rickey Henderson on being ejected by umpire Derryl Cousins for arguing a called third strike in the ninth inning.It's a fact: Gene Autry, who began the Angels as a new franchise in 1961, rode a golf cart onto the field Wednesday to the tune of "Back in the Saddle Again."Who's hot: The Angels' Chuck Finley, who beat the Yankees Wednesday, is 15-8 lifetime against New York.Who's not: Kenny Rogers, acquired in an off-season trade with the Yankees, walked five, hit a batter and allowed three runs and four hits in 5 1/3 inning in his first start for the Athletics.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.