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NEWS
By Liz Funk | August 6, 2008
NEW YORK - A few months ago, I was walking down 42nd Street in Midtown Manhattan and was surprised by a magazine cover being prominently displayed in the clear side window of a newsstand. Had the generally male-centric Details magazine really put Kelly Clarkson on its cover? There was a svelte brunette with those token beautiful eyes. When I got closer, I realized that it was really a picture of Zac Efron, the teen heartthrob of High School Musical fame. But in my defense, he looked downright girly.
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EXPLORE
December 9, 2011
The new anti-discrimination law to protect transgendered individuals caused me to reflect upon the new pro-discrimination policies at the Columbia swim center and how we will decide who makes us "feel uncomfortable. " For example, how do we plan to define "female" for our new women-only swim times? If we define "woman" as "absence of a Y chromosome," we will discriminate against transgendered men who identify as women. If we define "woman" as "someone who does not identify as a man," we will discriminate against transgendered women, though they are genetically female.
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NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | July 15, 2010
The Great Recession is not only bringing hardship for millions of Americans but is widening the divide between two broad types of men and masculinity. If you want a window on how economic hard times — not only since 2008 but as inequality has grown during recent decades — has affected manhood, take a look at two movies: "Up in the Air" and "Capitalism: A Love Story." In the first, George Clooney is literally atop the world, well dressed, well paid, slickly sophisticated, and courtier of the equally upscale and driven Vera Farmiga.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | July 15, 2010
The Great Recession is not only bringing hardship for millions of Americans but is widening the divide between two broad types of men and masculinity. If you want a window on how economic hard times — not only since 2008 but as inequality has grown during recent decades — has affected manhood, take a look at two movies: "Up in the Air" and "Capitalism: A Love Story." In the first, George Clooney is literally atop the world, well dressed, well paid, slickly sophisticated, and courtier of the equally upscale and driven Vera Farmiga.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART | May 15, 2005
When it comes to money, why can't a man be more like a woman? Female investors make fewer mistakes, a recent Merrill Lynch Investment Managers survey of 1,000 investors found. More men than women hold losing investments too long, and 43 percent wait too long to sell winners, versus 28 percent of women. More men than women admitted to repeating investment mistakes. They're more likely to buy a hot stock without researching it and more likely to do it again, the survey found. The data correspond with academic research from University of California professors Terrance Odean and Brad Barber.
EXPLORE
December 9, 2011
The new anti-discrimination law to protect transgendered individuals caused me to reflect upon the new pro-discrimination policies at the Columbia swim center and how we will decide who makes us "feel uncomfortable. " For example, how do we plan to define "female" for our new women-only swim times? If we define "woman" as "absence of a Y chromosome," we will discriminate against transgendered men who identify as women. If we define "woman" as "someone who does not identify as a man," we will discriminate against transgendered women, though they are genetically female.
NEWS
By Bonita Formwalt and Bonita Formwalt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 1997
WHEN THE curtain rises at 7 p.m. tonight on Glen Burnie High School's production of "My Gun Is Pink," the audience may find its notion of the detective genre in need of a little updating.Spoofing the traditional roles in movies, books and television, the play uses a male-female reversal for all the cast members, said drama teacher and director Bill Smith.Women play the roles of lead detective Babe Archer, her partner Angel Stark and the cops. Even the bad guys are gals."The last two or three years we've done plays with strong male characters," said Smith.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 17, 2004
BOSTON - Does anyone remember that the original version of The Stepford Wives was a horror movie? Women weren't bribed or brainwashed or seduced into becoming the perfect domestic and sex goddesses of suburbia. They were murdered by their husbands and replaced by robots. The Stepford Wives was a dark backlash movie of the mid-1970s. The main character was Joanna Eberhart, whose tentative steps as a "hopeful, semiprofessional photographer" were threatening enough to send her husband off to the Men's Association for an uncomplaining, unambitious replacement.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
As Hollywood breakups go, the media frenzy over the recent Julia Roberts-Benjamin Bratt split was not unusual. There were the rumors of a Roberts liaison with George Clooney and speculation that she may not be the marrying kind at all. But the many magazine cover stories and newspaper clips drew a common conclusion when analyzing the breakup of Hollywood's golden couple - Roberts brought it on by reportedly refusing to cut back on work and focus more...
NEWS
By Sonya Michel | October 16, 2008
Shelly Mandell, president of the Los Angeles chapter of the National Organization for Women, introduced Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin at a rally recently by saying - in an echo of Gloria Steinem a generation ago - "This is what a feminist looks like." As a women's historian, I would have to disagree. Mrs. Palin, despite her membership in the organization Feminists for Life, is not really a feminist. She is, rather, a "maternalist"- a woman who accepts the gendered division of labor but uses her assignment to home and family to claim the right to public participation.
NEWS
By Sonya Michel | October 16, 2008
Shelly Mandell, president of the Los Angeles chapter of the National Organization for Women, introduced Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin at a rally recently by saying - in an echo of Gloria Steinem a generation ago - "This is what a feminist looks like." As a women's historian, I would have to disagree. Mrs. Palin, despite her membership in the organization Feminists for Life, is not really a feminist. She is, rather, a "maternalist"- a woman who accepts the gendered division of labor but uses her assignment to home and family to claim the right to public participation.
NEWS
By Liz Funk | August 6, 2008
NEW YORK - A few months ago, I was walking down 42nd Street in Midtown Manhattan and was surprised by a magazine cover being prominently displayed in the clear side window of a newsstand. Had the generally male-centric Details magazine really put Kelly Clarkson on its cover? There was a svelte brunette with those token beautiful eyes. When I got closer, I realized that it was really a picture of Zac Efron, the teen heartthrob of High School Musical fame. But in my defense, he looked downright girly.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART | May 15, 2005
When it comes to money, why can't a man be more like a woman? Female investors make fewer mistakes, a recent Merrill Lynch Investment Managers survey of 1,000 investors found. More men than women hold losing investments too long, and 43 percent wait too long to sell winners, versus 28 percent of women. More men than women admitted to repeating investment mistakes. They're more likely to buy a hot stock without researching it and more likely to do it again, the survey found. The data correspond with academic research from University of California professors Terrance Odean and Brad Barber.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 17, 2004
BOSTON - Does anyone remember that the original version of The Stepford Wives was a horror movie? Women weren't bribed or brainwashed or seduced into becoming the perfect domestic and sex goddesses of suburbia. They were murdered by their husbands and replaced by robots. The Stepford Wives was a dark backlash movie of the mid-1970s. The main character was Joanna Eberhart, whose tentative steps as a "hopeful, semiprofessional photographer" were threatening enough to send her husband off to the Men's Association for an uncomplaining, unambitious replacement.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
As Hollywood breakups go, the media frenzy over the recent Julia Roberts-Benjamin Bratt split was not unusual. There were the rumors of a Roberts liaison with George Clooney and speculation that she may not be the marrying kind at all. But the many magazine cover stories and newspaper clips drew a common conclusion when analyzing the breakup of Hollywood's golden couple - Roberts brought it on by reportedly refusing to cut back on work and focus more...
NEWS
By Bonita Formwalt and Bonita Formwalt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 1997
WHEN THE curtain rises at 7 p.m. tonight on Glen Burnie High School's production of "My Gun Is Pink," the audience may find its notion of the detective genre in need of a little updating.Spoofing the traditional roles in movies, books and television, the play uses a male-female reversal for all the cast members, said drama teacher and director Bill Smith.Women play the roles of lead detective Babe Archer, her partner Angel Stark and the cops. Even the bad guys are gals."The last two or three years we've done plays with strong male characters," said Smith.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 16, 1993
Los Angeles--The taps pour real beer. But the stuff in the glass on the bar in front of where Norm sits and drinks and drinks and drinks is the non-alcoholic kind.The yellow-and-red Wurlitzer jukebox plays real tunes: "The In Crowd" by Dobie Gray, "Heartbreak Hotel" by Elvis Presley, "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" by the Platters and "I Fall to Pieces" by Patsy Cline. But the stairs behind it are fake and go nowhere. There is no Melville's fine seafood restaurant upstairs, as the sign promises.
FEATURES
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | March 9, 1999
American boys and girls do the same number of chores, but not the same kinds of chores, according to a survey in the March/April is sue of Zillions, the Consumer Reports magazine for kids.According to the survey of 1,000 children, gender roles continue to apply in the assigning of tasks. Boys mowed lawns and took out the trash more, while girls dominated in caring for younger siblings, meal preparation and housecleaning.All children surveyed did at least one chore weekly, and more than half performed five or more.
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