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By Liu Yang | May 20, 2014
Recent executive orders from the White House have rekindled a decades-long debate about gender pay disparities that persist in corporate America. Some blame the gap on lingering workplace biases that protect the "C suite" senior executives as the domain of men. Others dismiss the problem as overstated, citing the choices that women often make to sacrifice career advancement in favor of family. A new study, which I co-authored with Geoffrey Tate from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, debunks the argument that gender pay differences largely reflect the unequal career choices of men and women.
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BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
When Lisa Harris Jones launched her law firm 14 years ago, she used the only money she saw as an option - her own. Harris Jones said she founded Harris Jones & Malone with $7,000 on the belief that "if I can't buy it flat out, then I don't need it. " It has grown into a lobbying firm that takes in millions of dollars a year. "There's nothing in this office that's on credit," said Harris Jones of the Charles Village firm. Harris Jones isn't alone in the way she funded her business; many female entrepreneurs never seek capital from others.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 21, 2014
In 1978, Dr. Pauline Rose Clance described a pattern of fear she found among people who secretly believe they have climbed too high and will be found out at any moment. She called it "the impostor phenomenon. " It was, she wrote, a neurosis that exists in perfectionists who can never live up to their own high standards. Some men suffer from it, of course. But it reminds me of just about every woman I know, from the high-powered lawyer and lobbyist to the mom every other mother admires.
NEWS
By Liu Yang | May 20, 2014
Recent executive orders from the White House have rekindled a decades-long debate about gender pay disparities that persist in corporate America. Some blame the gap on lingering workplace biases that protect the "C suite" senior executives as the domain of men. Others dismiss the problem as overstated, citing the choices that women often make to sacrifice career advancement in favor of family. A new study, which I co-authored with Geoffrey Tate from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, debunks the argument that gender pay differences largely reflect the unequal career choices of men and women.
NEWS
By Pamela Haag | October 3, 2007
I enjoy the serenity of rare agnosticism on the matter of legalized gambling. I can turn the debate this way or that and see both sides. To learn more and perhaps claim a side, I drove to Dover Downs on a lovely spring day last year to see if it would serve up a cautionary tale or a fairy tale for Maryland. It took a few minutes to habituate myself to the cacophony created by 2,500 slot machines whistling, clanking and whirring at the same time. After that, the first thing that struck me seemed so obvious that I could not imagine I had not heard it before.
NEWS
By JODI S. COHEN and JODI S. COHEN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 12, 2006
CHICAGO -- Women are increasingly outnumbering men at America's colleges, a gap that is widest - and most troublesome - among low-income and minority students, researchers said in a report released yesterday. The share of males age 24 and younger dropped to 45 percent in 2003-2004, from 48 percent in 1995-1996. The gap is even wider for students older than 25, and among African-Americans and Latinos, particularly those from low-income families. "Yes, this is a matter of concern, but let's put it in context," said Jacqueline King, the author of the study by the American Council on Education.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | September 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Oh my gawd. Stop them before they hug again. Here comes Bill. There is Monica. See the back of Bill's head. See Monica's beaming smile. See them embrace. Freeze frame. Start again.Do they have this video clip on a continual loop? At this point in the news cycle -- or news recycle -- Bill and Monica have been together more often on television than in real life.Oh no! Here it comes again. This time, she's got the beret! Why do I have the feeling that we are witnessing a new form of media water torture.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | January 28, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Judging by the uproar over Harvard University President Lawrence H. Summers' ungraceful speculations about the shortage of elite female scientists and mathematicians, you might think women weren't doing so well in school. Not so. In many ways, they're beating the pants off the guys. Women nationwide have been closing gaps or surging ahead of men in just about every academic arena over the last three decades. Even in areas such as the sciences, where they remain underrepresented, they are catching up. The bad news is the guys.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - New census figures offer dramatic evidence of education's big payback: Income for African-Americans with a four-year college degree has increased so much since the civil rights advances of the 1960s that we have almost closed our historical income gap with four-year, college-educated whites. In 2003, the latest year for which figures are available, blacks with a bachelor's degree had a median income of $36,694, which is almost as high as the $38,667 median income of whites with a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | March 8, 2000
THE POUT FEST started at City College last fall. It was interrupted briefly by city school chief Dr. Robert Booker but then picked up again in January. The culprit -- or hero -- is City College Principal Joe Wilson, who has instituted new requirements for participating in extracurricular activities. Students who are absent four times can't participate, nor can those who are late 14 times. Students have to keep a 70 average, as well as a grade of 60 or better in three classes. Some City students -- and even some faculty -- have a problem with this.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Women who work for the federal government, on the whole, make less than their male co-workers - just as in the private sector. But among the federal workers , a new study shows, that earnings gap is narrowing. Between 1992 and 2012, according to the Office of Personnel Management, the difference between earnings for men and women shrank from 30 percent to 13 percent. On orders from President Barack Obama, the Office of Personnel Management reviewed salary data from 1992, 2002 and 2012 and looked at ways to reduce the gap. The study, "Governmentwide Strategy on Advancing Pay Equality in the Federal Government," was released this month.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
I read with interest Susan Reimer 's April 21st column: "A gender gap in confidence," expressing concern about women's lack of confidence. In the 1960s and early 1970s, very few women went to medical school. Our 1969 graduating class at the University of Maryland School of Medicine included six women out of 125 graduates. Nevertheless the following incident occurred to the first woman surgical resident at a major hospital. The first day, when she showed up in the Operating Room anteroom to undress and gown, she was confronted with two doors: "Doctors" and "Nurses.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 21, 2014
In 1978, Dr. Pauline Rose Clance described a pattern of fear she found among people who secretly believe they have climbed too high and will be found out at any moment. She called it "the impostor phenomenon. " It was, she wrote, a neurosis that exists in perfectionists who can never live up to their own high standards. Some men suffer from it, of course. But it reminds me of just about every woman I know, from the high-powered lawyer and lobbyist to the mom every other mother admires.
NEWS
By Andrea Giampetro-Meyer and Karyl B. Leggio | September 19, 2013
After more than three years in the courts, Bank of America will pay $39 million to settle a gender bias case in its Merrill Lynch brokerage operation. The women who brought this suit allege executives at the brokerage favored male employees by giving them the more lucrative deal opportunities, the choice clients, and more frequent promotions and raises, and that women who complained experienced retaliation. The firm's history with minority employees is far from stellar. In the 1970s, the firm settled a suit and agreed to make its workforce more diverse; these initiatives were never fully implemented.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | November 11, 2012
Fact: The empathy factor was a big winner for President Barack Obama. Opinion: It proved impossible for a wealthy CEO-type to compete in the "he cares about us" category. Mitt Romney's "47 percent" comment most certainly (further) strengthened this narrative. But it was the Obama campaign's relentless rhetoric against wealth and income disparity that carried the day with enough middle-class voters. Fact: Democratic candidates successfully exploited the gender gap when nobody was looking.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | May 30, 2008
Researchers have found one more clue in their search for the reason that girls don't do as well as boys in math: a nation's culture. Scientists compared math and reading scores on tests given to thousands of 15-year-old students in 40 countries and then examined how each country ranked in terms of gender equality. While girls generally scored lower in math than boys, girls did better in countries with greater gender equality than in less progressive countries. Girls performed best in countries such as Norway and Iceland, which have progressive gender policies, and worst in countries such as Turkey, which scored relatively low on standard measures of gender equality.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2001
Concerned about girls' lagging achievement in science, math and technology, Maryland educators are increasingly turning to summer programs to combat the gender gap. Single-sex programs are popping up in schools and on college campuses across the state, focusing on hands-on instruction in subjects that traditionally have had a tough time attracting girls. "Summer is a great opportunity for us to work with the girls and focus on science," says Lynn C. Cole, an associate professor at Towson University and director of its Institute for Gifted Children.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | May 30, 2008
Researchers have found one more clue in their search for the reason that girls don't do as well as boys in math: a nation's culture. Scientists compared math and reading scores on tests given to thousands of 15-year-old students in 40 countries and then examined how each country ranked in terms of gender equality. While girls generally scored lower in math than boys, girls did better in countries with greater gender equality than in less progressive countries. Girls performed best in countries such as Norway and Iceland, which have progressive gender policies, and worst in countries such as Turkey, which scored relatively low on standard measures of gender equality.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | May 29, 2008
Declaring and debunking crises has become a subsidiary industry of the gender wars. The latest to roll off the D&D assembly line is a study from the American Association of University Women (AAUW) that purports to debunk the idea of a "boys crisis," which followed closely on the heels of a purported "girls crisis." Boys are doing just fine, say the AAUW authors, who also insist that the boy crisis was a fabrication of people who are uncomfortable with the progress of girls and women. The authors also assert that girls' development hasn't come at the expense of boys, as some allegedly claim.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | May 18, 2008
Years ago, Denise Ferguson would drive over the Key Bridge, point at the sailboats in the water, and tell her children, "I'm going to do that someday," while secretly terrified at the prospect. Then one day, she showed up at a boat dock and was asked to help crew. She agreed. "I've always been scared to death of the wind, and I was terrified of even the idea of sailing," said Ferguson, 54, who raised her children in Bel Air before moving recently to Pennsylvania. "It was time I confronted my fear, and they needed a crew member.
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