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By Dionne L. Koller | September 18, 2009
When it comes to debating Title IX, Maryland is no different than any other state: Parents argue, school sports budgets go up and down, and gender equality is a legitimate goal with no real resolution in sight. But a few things do make our state unique: The University of Maryland, College Park, was the first school to declare cheerleading a varsity sport (an effort to close the equality gap between men's and women's athletics programs). We're also among the wealthiest states in the country, which translates into expensive endeavors for kids' sports.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2014
Your editorial on the Hobby Lobby ruling is correct in saying that by limiting full access to contraceptives, the Supreme Court's decision likely will lead to more unwanted pregnancies and the social harms they cause ( "Corporations trump people in Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision," June 30). Furthermore, The Sun accurately stated that companies would now be able to argue other matters on the basis of "religious freedom," at the expense of freedoms the Constitution originally granted to individuals.
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NEWS
May 21, 1993
The Committee on Gender Equality has recommended and Judge Thomas J. Bollinger has agreed that he take sensitivity training. He displayed a lack of sensitivity, to say the least, with his sentence and his comments in a rape case in BaltimoreCounty Circuit Court last month. He criticized the law and the victim while letting the convicted man off with probation before judgment.The committee's recommendation is compassionate, to say the least. His attendance at training sessions would be the sum total of his "punishment."
NEWS
April 5, 2012
The Board of Directors ofT. Rowe Price Group, Inc, a company worth over $16 billion, have given us investors the opportunity to vote for or against only one woman to join their Board of Directors at their annual meeting on April 17. Worse, there is only one woman on the entire board, and not one woman is an executive officer. What man of moral merit or social integrity, an IQ greater than a prokaryote, or a scintilla of political consciousness would yield his name to a proxy, much less a board, on which there was such a poor gender ratio?
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | May 30, 2008
Researchers have found one more clue in their search for the reason that girls don't do as well as boys in math: a nation's culture. Scientists compared math and reading scores on tests given to thousands of 15-year-old students in 40 countries and then examined how each country ranked in terms of gender equality. While girls generally scored lower in math than boys, girls did better in countries with greater gender equality than in less progressive countries. Girls performed best in countries such as Norway and Iceland, which have progressive gender policies, and worst in countries such as Turkey, which scored relatively low on standard measures of gender equality.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,Los Angeles Times | February 18, 2009
TOKYO -In her first trip abroad as secretary of state, Hillary Clinton issued a sharp warning yesterday to North Korea over its threatened missile test, signed a military agreement with Japan and conferred with senior Japanese officials on topics that included the enveloping world financial crisis. But a 45-minute "town hall" meeting at the University of Tokyo also gave the country's chief diplomat a chance to project a softer American image. She avoided the phrase war on terror, which was standard terminology during the George W. Bush years.
NEWS
February 7, 2011
The article in The Baltimore Sun, "For Israel, change could be unsettling" (Feb. 5), accurately describes the trepidation the only democracy in the Middle East feels, in light of the recent tumultuous uprisings that have surrounded it. However, part of the reason for that "unsettling" feeling might be because while most of the world heard about Tunisia's revolution, few are aware, as The Jerusalem Post reported, that unidentified assailants set...
NEWS
July 3, 2014
Your editorial on the Hobby Lobby ruling is correct in saying that by limiting full access to contraceptives, the Supreme Court's decision likely will lead to more unwanted pregnancies and the social harms they cause ( "Corporations trump people in Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision," June 30). Furthermore, The Sun accurately stated that companies would now be able to argue other matters on the basis of "religious freedom," at the expense of freedoms the Constitution originally granted to individuals.
NEWS
By GILBERT A LEWTHWAITE and GILBERT A LEWTHWAITE,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 9, 1998
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - A Muslim radio station's refusal to allow women to broadcast has provoked a conflict in this fledgling democracy between religious freedom and gender equality - two pillars of the country's new constitution.The Muslim fundamentalist owners of Radio Islam believe a woman's voice is part of her being and, like her body, should be kept hidden from the public. Critics of the policy are opposing a new license for the station, citing sexual discrimination.It is a row of such fundamental dimensions that it could be headed for the Constitutional Court.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
The Board of Directors ofT. Rowe Price Group, Inc, a company worth over $16 billion, have given us investors the opportunity to vote for or against only one woman to join their Board of Directors at their annual meeting on April 17. Worse, there is only one woman on the entire board, and not one woman is an executive officer. What man of moral merit or social integrity, an IQ greater than a prokaryote, or a scintilla of political consciousness would yield his name to a proxy, much less a board, on which there was such a poor gender ratio?
NEWS
February 7, 2011
The article in The Baltimore Sun, "For Israel, change could be unsettling" (Feb. 5), accurately describes the trepidation the only democracy in the Middle East feels, in light of the recent tumultuous uprisings that have surrounded it. However, part of the reason for that "unsettling" feeling might be because while most of the world heard about Tunisia's revolution, few are aware, as The Jerusalem Post reported, that unidentified assailants set...
NEWS
By Dionne L. Koller | September 18, 2009
When it comes to debating Title IX, Maryland is no different than any other state: Parents argue, school sports budgets go up and down, and gender equality is a legitimate goal with no real resolution in sight. But a few things do make our state unique: The University of Maryland, College Park, was the first school to declare cheerleading a varsity sport (an effort to close the equality gap between men's and women's athletics programs). We're also among the wealthiest states in the country, which translates into expensive endeavors for kids' sports.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,Los Angeles Times | February 18, 2009
TOKYO -In her first trip abroad as secretary of state, Hillary Clinton issued a sharp warning yesterday to North Korea over its threatened missile test, signed a military agreement with Japan and conferred with senior Japanese officials on topics that included the enveloping world financial crisis. But a 45-minute "town hall" meeting at the University of Tokyo also gave the country's chief diplomat a chance to project a softer American image. She avoided the phrase war on terror, which was standard terminology during the George W. Bush years.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | May 30, 2008
Researchers have found one more clue in their search for the reason that girls don't do as well as boys in math: a nation's culture. Scientists compared math and reading scores on tests given to thousands of 15-year-old students in 40 countries and then examined how each country ranked in terms of gender equality. While girls generally scored lower in math than boys, girls did better in countries with greater gender equality than in less progressive countries. Girls performed best in countries such as Norway and Iceland, which have progressive gender policies, and worst in countries such as Turkey, which scored relatively low on standard measures of gender equality.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | January 20, 2007
Two Baltimore natives scored historic breakthroughs this month when Sheila Dixon was sworn in as the city's first female mayor in its more than 200 years and Nancy Pelosi became the first woman to wield the gavel as speaker of the U.S. House. Celebrations must by tempered, though, by the recognition that both are anomalies. Women remain woefully underrepresented in this country's corridors of power. Despite recent gains in Washington, women make up only 16 percent of Congress, and actually lost five seats in Annapolis, where distaff members of the General Assembly number one-third.
NEWS
By GILBERT A LEWTHWAITE and GILBERT A LEWTHWAITE,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 9, 1998
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - A Muslim radio station's refusal to allow women to broadcast has provoked a conflict in this fledgling democracy between religious freedom and gender equality - two pillars of the country's new constitution.The Muslim fundamentalist owners of Radio Islam believe a woman's voice is part of her being and, like her body, should be kept hidden from the public. Critics of the policy are opposing a new license for the station, citing sexual discrimination.It is a row of such fundamental dimensions that it could be headed for the Constitutional Court.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | September 1, 1995
Boston -- You might have thought the only real issue was the relationship between China and United States. The China question -- should we or shouldn't we ''reward'' them with our presence? -- dominated the Sunday talk shows.For that matter you might have believed that the gathering of 30,000 women from some 180 countries was of importance only for its effect on American presidential politics. Journeying ever-rightward, Bob Dole said the whole event was about inflicting a ''left-wing ideological agenda'' on the world.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | January 20, 2007
Two Baltimore natives scored historic breakthroughs this month when Sheila Dixon was sworn in as the city's first female mayor in its more than 200 years and Nancy Pelosi became the first woman to wield the gavel as speaker of the U.S. House. Celebrations must by tempered, though, by the recognition that both are anomalies. Women remain woefully underrepresented in this country's corridors of power. Despite recent gains in Washington, women make up only 16 percent of Congress, and actually lost five seats in Annapolis, where distaff members of the General Assembly number one-third.
NEWS
December 13, 1997
THE INFLUX of women into the paid labor force during the past several decades has not been confined to the United States. Neither have concerns about "glass ceilings," the level beyond which few women advance in the corporate structure.All around the world, women are finding their way into jobs outside the home. Many of them are aspiring to higher levels of responsibility, but they are finding varying degrees of success. A new survey by the International Labor Organization looks at the rates of women in administrative and managerial jobs.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | September 1, 1995
Boston -- You might have thought the only real issue was the relationship between China and United States. The China question -- should we or shouldn't we ''reward'' them with our presence? -- dominated the Sunday talk shows.For that matter you might have believed that the gathering of 30,000 women from some 180 countries was of importance only for its effect on American presidential politics. Journeying ever-rightward, Bob Dole said the whole event was about inflicting a ''left-wing ideological agenda'' on the world.
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