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Gender Bias

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NEWS
May 21, 1993
The Committee on Gender Equality has recommended and Judge Thomas J. Bollinger has agreed that he take sensitivity training. He displayed a lack of sensitivity, to say the least, with his sentence and his comments in a rape case in BaltimoreCounty Circuit Court last month. He criticized the law and the victim while letting the convicted man off with probation before judgment.The committee's recommendation is compassionate, to say the least. His attendance at training sessions would be the sum total of his "punishment."
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2011
A former employee's lawsuit accusing Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold of retaliatory termination and creating a hostile work environment can move forward, a federal judge ordered Thursday, but she threw out several allegations and blocked the attempts of two other workers to join the suit. Judge Catherine C. Blake made the rulings in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, but did not rule on a motion for summary judgment requested by Leopold's attorneys, which would have ended the case.
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BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1994
What were you doing most of last week? Were you working, looking for work, or keeping house?The question may sound innocuous enough, but because of its final three words, the U.S. unemployment rate was substantially underreported for nearly three decades until this January.That is because pollsters for the Bureau of Labor Statistics asked the question, in that form, only of women. For men, the question left off "or keeping house.""A lot of women chose to say that they had been keeping house, even though they might have worked part time or spent a few hours looking for work," bureau economist Peter Cattan said.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2010
A former Baltimore City government employee says she was fired as a result of race, age and gender discrimination. Melissa Fulton, 63, lost her job in the Mayor's Office of Minority and Women-Owned Business Development in February when Stephanie Rawlings-Blake became mayor, after Sheila Dixon's resignation as part of a plea deal in her criminal case. Fulton, who says she was the only white employee in a four-person office, contends that she was fired despite having a satisfactory record and no disciplinary issues, while a younger black male counterpart was retained even though he had been disciplined, according to a complaint filed with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
NEWS
February 12, 1993
DO women pay more for certain products and services than men? Are women exposed to more marketplace hazards than men? The answer to both questions is yes.Many a woman has a story about how an auto repair or home repair firm took advantage of feminine stereotypes and tried to gouge her. Even more women probably never knew of this gender-based fraud; they just paid.Driven by exploitative images of female flightiness, insecurity and emotionalism, too many repair shops, financial and legal agencies are defrauding women.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | April 14, 1991
Harford County courts are, for the most part, free of gender bias, except perhaps in the area of family law, a study by the Harford County Bar Association concludes."
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 13, 1999
BOSTON -- The heart of the story is the tape measure. Try to imagine the best and the brightest female tenured professors lurking around the halls of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, measuring the size of the men's labs and offices against their own.There is something so techie about it, so wonky, so MIT. The 15 women -- physicists, chemists, biologists -- were in search of hard numbers to prove what they had once been reluctant to admit: Men...
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | April 10, 1992
Hundreds of volunteers have been sitting quietly in Maryland's courtrooms this week, keeping their eyes peeled for displays of "gender bias" from the state's judges and lawyers.It has not been the most covert of stakeouts, however. The judges saw them coming.The weeklong "Courtwatch" was commissioned by the Women's Bar Association of Maryland as a follow-up to a 1989 study that said discrimination against women was widespread in the state's courts.More than 370 volunteers -- mostly females, mostly students, paralegals and members of organizations such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the House of Ruth -- were recruited and trained to monitor the courtrooms and keep score of everything from gender- and race-based jokes to the formality of the lawyers' attire.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | November 14, 1991
In an era when more education often translates into better pay, a striking gender gap persists in the workplace, according to a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau.A woman who has completed at least four years of college and works fulltime typically earns $25,929, roughly the same as the $25,372 median earnings of men with a high school education, the report found.The report, based on 1989 survey data, also documents racial disparities. High school-educated blacks typically earn 80 percent of their white peers.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
THE AMERICAN Association of University Women has a knack for riling 'em up.Six years ago, the association took considerable heat when it issued a report documenting the damage done to girls by gender bias in education.Girls are often "shortchanged" in coeducational settings, the report said. The self-esteem of the best female students can be badly damaged.The next year, conservative talk-show hosts went into full voice criticizing another AAUW report, "Hostile Hallways," which described pervasive sexual harassment of girls at all levels of schooling.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | January 22, 2008
If you know a young woman who is about to graduate from college or who has just started working, you ought to buy her a copy of Skirt! Rules for the Workplace: An Irreverent Guide to Advancing Your Career, by Kelly Love Johnson. It is advice on how to work smarter, faster, tougher and better than any guy - or any other woman - and get ahead. Johnson is the managing editor of the unfortunately titled Skirt magazine (Why not call it Dame or Doll magazine?) and she uses her own up-from-the-freelance-pool story to illustrate her tips.
NEWS
By LYNETTE LONG | January 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The United States Postal Service recently released its list of commemorative stamps for this year. The 127 new issues will include 15 stamps commemorating famous Americans, four of which will be women (Hattie McDaniel, Katherine Anne Porter, Frances E. Willis, Judy Garland) and 11 of which will be men (Benjamin Franklin, Sugar Ray Robinson, Hiram Bingham IV, Charles E. Bohlen, Philip C. Habib, Robert D. Murphy, Clifton R. Wharton Sr., Mickey Mantle, Mel Ott, Roy Campanella, Hank Greenberg)
NEWS
December 21, 2005
Nearly one out of six U.S. employees say they were discriminated against at work in the past year, with women more than twice as likely as men to claim bias over hiring and pay, according to a new poll. The poll released this month by the Gallup Organization found that middle-aged women and minorities were more likely to report being victims. Out of the 1,252 part-time and full-time workers interviewed by telephone, women were more than twice as likely to claim discrimination (22 percent)
NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | October 12, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Are critics of Supreme Court nominee Harriet E. Miers guilty of sexism? Or do they simply feel she is unqualified to sit on the nation's highest court? As the White House and Miers' opponents prepare for what could be contentious Senate hearings, the fact that she is a woman is emerging as a weapon of choice for operatives on both sides. First lady Laura Bush waded into the dispute yesterday, when asked whether her husband's most recent nominee was a victim of sexism. "That's possible.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - To understand the world that produced Raiford Chatman Davis, it is perhaps enough to understand how he got his name changed. It happened when his mother went to register his birth certificate. She told the man at the counter that her son was known as R. C. Davis. The clerk misheard her, but she didn't correct him. He was white, she was black, and this was Georgia. So R. C. spent the rest of his life under the name that resulted from an uncorrected error: Ossie Davis. He died Feb. 4 in Miami, a courtly and elegant man of 87 years, justifiably lionized for his accomplishments as a writer and actor in a career that spanned six decades.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 18, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - An assistant manager at Costco Wholesale Corp., the largest U.S. warehouse-club chain, accused the company of discriminating against female workers by failing to promote as many as 650 women to high-paying management jobs. Shirley "Rae" Ellis said in a lawsuit filed yesterday in U.S. District Court in San Francisco that Costco doesn't post or advertise store manager jobs. She is seeking class action status for the lawsuit, which would enable all 650 workers to sue as a group.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | September 9, 1994
The NAACP, shaken by a sexual-harassment controversy that led to the firing of Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., welcomed two dozen women to its Baltimore headquarters yesterday and said it would review its policies for gender bias.The name of Mary E. Stansel, a former aide to Dr. Chavis, wasn't mentioned.But Ms. Stansel's charges of sexual harassment against the former NAACP leader -- and his secret deal to pay her up to $332,400 of NAACP funds to fend off a lawsuit -- formed the backdrop for the gathering, which was attended by elected officials and civic activists.
NEWS
March 14, 1992
"Schools Shortchange Girls," according to a report by the American Association of University Women. That sounds right -- we all know discrimination and cultural conditioning persist in the lives of girls. Yet the report is a disappointing case study in politicized science. Knowing what it wanted to prove, the AAUW rounded up some facts and stuffed them into a predetermined conclusion.What facts? Well, according to the AAUW, girls and boys start school roughly equal in skills and confidence, but girls trail by the end of high school.
BUSINESS
By Ameet Sachdev and Ameet Sachdev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 1, 2004
CHICAGO - Mary Stowell wears Ann Taylor suits, hates to procrastinate, is a stickler for details and loves opera. Linda Friedman wears sweaters that look like they were knitted by your favorite grandmother, works well under deadline, and laments the lack of a personal life. What binds the law partners is their belief in social justice and fair play. They have rattled Wall Street by doggedly pursuing sex-discrimination lawsuits on behalf of hundreds of women employed at the nation's biggest securities firms.
NEWS
By Jehangir Pocha and Jehangir Pocha,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 2003
TEHRAN, Iran - Unable to contain his annoyance over a reservation problem, the male customer at the travel agency counter snaps at the woman helping him, insisting that he wants to see the manager. The woman leans forward - and gently tells him she owns the place. "It must have been a dual blow for him," Naudi Zamani says with a laugh later that evening as she pulls down the shutter of the three-person travel agency she started last year. "First he must have been surprised that a woman owned the place, then worried that there was no man to help sort out the problem."
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