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NEWS
By Ilene Hollin and Ilene Hollin,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2004
Laurie Smullin Russell, a nurse and former hospital official whose extensive volunteer activities extended to fund raising for research into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis after she was found to have the illness nearly four years ago, died Monday at her Glyndon home. She was 58. A fund-raiser professionally as assistant director of development at Union Memorial Hospital, Mrs. Russell volunteered her skills for other civic and cultural organizations. After she was found to have the illness known as Lou Gehrig's disease in August 2000, she became involved in the Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins Medicine.
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NEWS
By David Steele and David Steele,david.steele@baltsun.com | January 13, 2009
The person considered the strongest Raven by coach John Harbaugh received the game ball after Saturday's AFC divisional playoff victory over the Tennessee Titans in Nashville, even though he didn't take a snap or put on a uniform. In the victorious locker room at LP Field, Pro Bowl safety Ed Reed handed the ball to O.J. Brigance, the Ravens' director of player development, saying, "This is for you." Brigance expressed thanks from the motorized wheelchair that he uses as he battles Lou Gehrig's disease, then added, "but we've got two more to play."
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
A common antibiotic used to treat skin and lung infections may prolong the lives and ease the symptoms of patients with Lou Gehrig's disease and other neurological ailments, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. Scientists from the Hopkins medical school reported in the journal Nature this week that injections of ceftriaxone increased survival rates of mice genetically engineered with Lou Gehrig's disease, known scientifically as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. The prescription drug also delayed the nerve damage and loss of muscle function that are common symptoms of ALS. Although results with laboratory animals are often difficult to duplicate in humans, the findings indicate that ceftriaxone contains some ingredient with the potential to treat not only ALS, but also other neurological disorders, including dementia and epilepsy, the researchers say. "What it means is, there's a whole class of drugs out there that we may be able to use in new ways," said Dr. Jeffrey Rothstein, lead author of the paper.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | May 19, 2008
The first time he fell, Army Sgt. 1st Class Anthony Averella was strolling on a military base in Afghanistan. He got up, collected himself and brushed aside the concerns of fellow soldiers. Within months, Averella was stumbling regularly, and his hands began inexplicably clenching into fists. At first, tests revealed nothing. Three years ago, the Maryland soldier found out what was afflicting him: Lou Gehrig's disease. Once an intense weightlifter, Averella is now bedridden at his Glen Burnie apartment, every part of him dying but his mind.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | September 10, 1995
The man outplayed the hype.Somehow, he stood above the onslaught of celebrity and circus. For 14 years, he danced beyond the spikes, survived the brawls, the slippery shower room floors and all the other freaky things that force the best of us to the bench.Calvin Edwin Ripken Jr. claimed his laurel Thursday night, appropriating the record for baseball games played consecutively: 2,131 as of that moment.He claimed it almost apologetically from Lou Gehrig, the New York Yankees first baseman whose record of 2,130 straight games ended 56 years ago with the onset of a fatal nerve disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1995
Preparations are being made so President Clinton can attend Cal Ripken's potential record-breaking game Sept. 6 at Camden Yards, Orioles and White House sources said.In another Sept. 6 development, the Orioles are selling 260 on-field seats at $5,000 apiece so Ripken can present Johns Hopkins officials with a $1 million check to aid research of Lou Gehrig's disease, team sources said.Both events are still in the planning stages. Provided there are no rainouts, or injuries, Ripken will break Gehrig'sconsecutive-games record on Sept.
NEWS
February 23, 2001
Dr. Jeffrey Rothstein, a leading neurologist at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, has received a $100,000 award for his research into Lou Gehrig's disease. The prize was given yesterday by the University of Miami, which honored Rothstein for discovering key mechanisms of the disease and leading an effort to find a cure. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease, destroys nerves of the brain and spinal cord and progressively robs people of their ability to move. The annual Lois Pope LIFE International Research Award honors scientists who have made significant medical breakthroughs in their field.
NEWS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | March 10, 2008
O.J. Brigance remembers the 2001 Super Bowl like it was yesterday, when he charged down the field for the Ravens and collided with a kick returner for the first tackle of the game. Now, everyday activities like eating are as challenging as his old workouts. Picking up a fork these days feels like lifting more than a hundred pounds of weights. Brigance, 38, was diagnosed in May 2007 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, a progressive and fatal disease that shuts down nerve cells responsible for movement.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 1995
During their coverage of Cal Ripken's record-breaking consecutive-game streak, the media constantly referred to Lou Gehrig's disease. I would like to know more about that disease.Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, the medical term for Lou Gehrig's disease, is a relentlessly progressive disorder caused by deterioration of the motor nerves (nerves that control the action of muscles) in both the brain and spinal cord. The first manifestations are typically weakness and clumsiness of one or both hands; but the symptoms may begin in almost any muscle, and most muscles are affected as the disease worsens.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1995
In 1938, Lou Gehrig was diagnosed with the degenerative nerve disease ALS. He would lose his capacity to walk, talk and swallow. He would die choking as the disease followed its normal, horrific course.His physicians could scarcely imagine what caused it.Now, researchers speak of progress - hints that they can slow the disease's destruction. They do not, however, speak of cures.Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, causes the atrophy and death of specialized nerve cells in the spinal cord that control virtually all the muscles that enable us to move.
NEWS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | March 10, 2008
O.J. Brigance remembers the 2001 Super Bowl like it was yesterday, when he charged down the field for the Ravens and collided with a kick returner for the first tackle of the game. Now, everyday activities like eating are as challenging as his old workouts. Picking up a fork these days feels like lifting more than a hundred pounds of weights. Brigance, 38, was diagnosed in May 2007 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, a progressive and fatal disease that shuts down nerve cells responsible for movement.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | August 2, 2007
I cannot take statin-type drugs. Is there a natural way to get triglycerides down? Triglycerides have just been shown to increase the risk of heart attacks (Journal of the American Medical Association, July 18). Fish oil is a natural way to lower this risk factor for heart disease. I have been fascinated with letters from people reporting that Lipitor weakened their muscles. I believe Lipitor triggered my ALS. Until last month, my doctors wouldn't listen to me, but then a report from the World Health Organization showed a link.
NEWS
May 28, 2005
Ralph V. Mitzel, a retired Pennsylvania Railroad freight conductor and woodworker, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - Lou Gehrig's disease - Wednesday at a daughter's home in Crestview, Fla. He was 88 and formerly a longtime Hampden resident. Mr. Mitzel was born in Baltimore into a family of railroaders and raised on Keswick Road in Hampden. His father had been president of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, and an older brother had been a Pennsy passenger conductor. Mr. Mitzel attended City College, and in 1933 was hired by the railroad.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
A common antibiotic used to treat skin and lung infections may prolong the lives and ease the symptoms of patients with Lou Gehrig's disease and other neurological ailments, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. Scientists from the Hopkins medical school reported in the journal Nature this week that injections of ceftriaxone increased survival rates of mice genetically engineered with Lou Gehrig's disease, known scientifically as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. The prescription drug also delayed the nerve damage and loss of muscle function that are common symptoms of ALS. Although results with laboratory animals are often difficult to duplicate in humans, the findings indicate that ceftriaxone contains some ingredient with the potential to treat not only ALS, but also other neurological disorders, including dementia and epilepsy, the researchers say. "What it means is, there's a whole class of drugs out there that we may be able to use in new ways," said Dr. Jeffrey Rothstein, lead author of the paper.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2004
Ruxton Pharmaceuticals, a local bioscience start-up focusing chiefly on finding a treatment for Lou Gehrig's disease, has secured $5.2 million in a first round of private funding, including $1.7 million from venture capital giant New Enterprise Associates, Ruxton and NEA announced yesterday. At a time when the Baltimore region is working to build up its biotech sector, executives say yesterday's deal underscore's the area's bioscience strengths: Ruxton will be locally based and has licensed technology developed by a prominent Johns Hopkins researcher, while the Menlo Park, Calif.
NEWS
July 13, 2004
Peggy Lou Compton, a retired Social Security Administration employee and avid traveler, died Wednesday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis --Lou Gehrig's disease -- at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 67. Born in Parkersburg, W.Va., the former Peggy Lou Barringer was raised in Akron, Ohio, where she graduated from high school in 1954. She married Gary Compton in 1959, and they moved to the Baltimore area in 1967. They lived in Ellicott City for 15 years. The marriage ended in divorce.
NEWS
July 13, 2004
Peggy Lou Compton, a retired Social Security Administration employee and avid traveler, died Wednesday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis --Lou Gehrig's disease -- at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 67. Born in Parkersburg, W.Va., the former Peggy Lou Barringer was raised in Akron, Ohio, where she graduated from high school in 1954. She married Gary Compton in 1959, and they moved to the Baltimore area in 1967. They lived in Ellicott City for 15 years. The marriage ended in divorce.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick | June 11, 1993
A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME(Paramount, 1991)"I wanted to try to reinvent the documentary genre," Errol Morris recently said. "The documentary for years has been seen as a kind of journalism but rarely as an art form."Mixing dramatic re-enactments and talking-head interviews, Mr. Morris created such a visually convincing argument about the innocence of a man convicted of murder in his widely acclaimed 1988 film, "The Thin Blue Line," and many credited him with the subsequent release of the prisoner.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
Elaine G. Weinstein, a homemaker and artist, died of Lou Gehrig's disease -- amyotrophic lateral sclerosis -- June 21 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Stevenson resident was 79. Born Elaine G. Cohen in Baltimore and raised on Forest Park Avenue, she was a 1943 graduate of Forest Park High School. After earning a degree in early childhood education from Goucher College in 1946, she taught at Arlington Elementary School on West Rogers Avenue from 1948 to 1950. In 1945, she married Dr. Frederick Weinstein, a now-retired Baltimore dentist.
NEWS
By Ilene Hollin and Ilene Hollin,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2004
Laurie Smullin Russell, a nurse and former hospital official whose extensive volunteer activities extended to fund raising for research into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis after she was found to have the illness nearly four years ago, died Monday at her Glyndon home. She was 58. A fund-raiser professionally as assistant director of development at Union Memorial Hospital, Mrs. Russell volunteered her skills for other civic and cultural organizations. After she was found to have the illness known as Lou Gehrig's disease in August 2000, she became involved in the Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins Medicine.
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