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NEWS
September 12, 1995
Of all the CALebrations last week, none was more touching than the creation of a Cal Ripken Jr./Lou Gehrig Fund to finance research at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions on the degenerate nerve disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, that killed the legendary Yankee player more than half a century ago. Orioles owner Peter Angelos conceived the plan to sell 260 field-level seats at $5,000 apiece to raise $1.3 million. Then the baseball club promised to kick in another $700,000 to push the fund to the $2 million mark.
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SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Cal Ripken Jr.announced today that he'll be auctioning off the 1994 Chevy Suburban that he drove for several years during his Hall of Fame career with the Orioles.  Ripken drove the truck to Camden Yards the nights he tied and broke Lou Gehrig's consecutive games played record, Sept. 5 and 6, 1995. Ripken also drove the Suburban to Orioles postseason games in 1996 and 1997, according to a news release put out by his public relations firm. The winning bidder will receive first-class airfare and lodging for two in Baltimore, and he or she will be invited to attend the Sports Legends Museum Gala honoring Ripken and fellow Hall of Famer Eddie Murray on Sept.
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SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | August 9, 1995
Linking Lou Gehrig's name to a bottle of Scotch whisky so aroused the ire of his widow, Eleanor, that she went to see a lawyer. The attorney wrote a letter to the advertising agency, demanding that the practice cease and desist or legal action would be forthcoming.Now, years after a copyright was filed to further protect the use of Gehrig's name and picture, Cal Ripken Jr. is on his unrelenting march to break the longevity mark of playing 2,130 consecutive games, a baseball record that can't be copyrighted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
Dudley Clendinen relished nothing more than telling a great story — even the story of his impending death. A journalist and author who wrote for The New York Times and had once served as an editor for The Baltimore Sun, Mr. Clendinen died Wednesday at Baltimore's Joseph Richey House hospice of complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. He was 67. He chronicled his 18-month struggle with the condition commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease on Baltimore public radio station WYPR in a series titled "Living with Lou: Dudley Clendinen on a Good, Short Life.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1995
Cal Ripken's consecutive-games streak has gotten collectors interested in Lou Gehrig, the man whose streak Ripken broke.But people used to buying new collectibles are discovering that vintage Gehrig material is rare and expensive."
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2001
When Cal Ripken wasn't accepting more congratulations or soaking in another long ovation in 1995, he managed to hit .262 with 17 homers and 88 RBIs. The season was cut short, to 144 games, because of the previous year's labor dispute. It remained long on drama and emotion. Could anyone forget his lap around Camden Yards on Sept. 6, the night Lou Gehrig let go of the record for consecutive games played? All the hands he touched? All the lives? It wasn't enough that Ripken tried to win ballgames.
SPORTS
By Sun staff writers Brad Snyder, Rafael Alvarez, Roch Eric Kubatko, Gary Lambrecht, Peter Hermann, Alan Goldstein and Peter Schmuck | September 7, 1995
Happy birthday to youHe was sitting in the last row of the last section in left field, but Jeffrey Cederbaum of Columbia wasn't complaining about the view. He turned 13 yesterday, and he got a birthday present he won't forget.He got the tickets by a stroke of luck. He attended a spring baseball camp, and the campers were offered a chance to purchase Orioles tickets and attend a bullpen party."I just sent away for the tickets," said Ken Cederbaum, Jeffrey's father. "I almost swooned when six tickets came back with Sept.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1995
The bookshelf is one place to visit for the story of Lou Gehrig's remarkable record of 2,130 consecutive games.Another is the living room of Bill Werber.Werber, 87, is among a handful of men who were teammates of Gehrig and who are alive to reminisce about it. In 1930 and 1933, Werber was a young infielder for the New York Yankees playing in the long shadow of such legends as Gehrig and Babe Ruth.By the time Werber joined the Yankees, Gehrig's streak had reached several hundred games. Werber soon discovered how it had happened.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | September 11, 1995
Last week, during "The Crush" accompanying "The Conclusion" of "The Streak" by Cal Ripken to break Lou Gehrig's consecutive-games played ordeal (let me see, what was that number?), I related a little story about how Gehrig once booted a radio commercial.On hand today to relate "the rest of the story," as broadcaster Paul Harvey might put it, is Harry G. Gesser, longtime Baltimorean, ex-softball team manager and a man with one terrific memory:"I believe it [the original story] happened about 1937 or 1938.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | July 23, 1995
If Cal Ripken succeeds in breaking Lou Gehrig's consecutive-games record of 2,130 games on Sept. 6 at Camden Yards, the baseball world will revel in the chance to see history being made.But one corner of that world -- Japan -- will view the event with at least a touch of skepticism.It's not that the Japanese hold anything against Ripken, who is enormously popular there, or that they believe his streak is anything less than the marvel it obviously is.It's just that, to the Japanese, Ripken would need to play in another 85 straight games after Sept.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | May 4, 2011
There’s no debating that Orioles legend Cal Ripken Jr. played in 2,632 consecutive games, an incredible streak that spoke volumes about the shortstop’s dedication, durability and caliber of play. The sports world stood still as Ripken took the field at Camden Yards for his 2,131st consecutive game on September 6, 1995 and broke the record Yankees great Lou Gerhig had held for 56 years. And even if we had somehow missed that night and the hundreds that came before it and there was a legitimate question about the identity of the standard bearer for one of the most celebrated records in sports history, those 2,632 box scores would be pretty compelling evidence in support of Ripken, right?
HEALTH
Susan Reimer | April 20, 2011
Writer Dudley Clendinen is a gifted raconteur, weaving his stories in a soft Southern accent and with a courtly manner. It is easy to imagine him captivating dinner guests until long after the candles have burned down. It is a savage irony, then, that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is taking his voice first when it might have chosen his limbs instead. It was slurred speech that gave Clendinen, 66, the first hint of trouble. A former national reporter and editorial writer for The New York Times who also worked for The Baltimore Sun, he had settled here to write books and teach.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Johns Hopkins recently cleared the $200 million mark in grants received as part of federal stimulus spending, demonstrating that not even a deep recession could choke the university's ability to attract research money. The Johns Hopkins University recently cleared the $200 million mark in grants received as part of federal stimulus spending, demonstrating that not even a deep recession could choke its ability to attract research money. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act gave $12.4 billion to the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation for grants to be distributed between February 2009 and September 2010.
NEWS
By joe and teresa graedon | August 31, 2009
Question: : My husband started on lovastatin for high cholesterol and soon began to notice weakness in his right arm. This weakness progressed, so he saw his doctor, thinking he had a pinched nerve. He was referred to a neurologist, who gave him a diagnosis of "possible ALS." On his 60th birthday, a second opinion confirmed the diagnosis of ALS. Since that time, my husband has progressed from weakness in his right arm to complete loss of function in his arms, very weak leg muscles and difficulty breathing.
NEWS
By David Steele and David Steele,david.steele@baltsun.com | January 13, 2009
The person considered the strongest Raven by coach John Harbaugh received the game ball after Saturday's AFC divisional playoff victory over the Tennessee Titans in Nashville, even though he didn't take a snap or put on a uniform. In the victorious locker room at LP Field, Pro Bowl safety Ed Reed handed the ball to O.J. Brigance, the Ravens' director of player development, saying, "This is for you." Brigance expressed thanks from the motorized wheelchair that he uses as he battles Lou Gehrig's disease, then added, "but we've got two more to play."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN REPORTER | July 25, 2008
The Department of Veterans Affairs plans to provide full disability payments for Lou Gehrig's disease, tacitly acknowledging for the first time a generalized link between the fatal neurological disorder and military service. Veterans and patient advocates have advocated the change for years, citing studies showing that former soldiers are more likely than the general population to contract the disease, formally known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. The VA already extends full compensation to ALS-stricken veterans of the first Persian Gulf war, who, according to a study earlier this decade, are twice as likely as other service members to contract the disease.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 3, 1995
Chuck Burke spent the final 56 years of his life remembering the last time he saw Lou Gehrig. It was the spring of 1939, two days before a dying Gehrig pulled himself out of the New York Yankees lineup."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | May 19, 2008
The first time he fell, Army Sgt. 1st Class Anthony Averella was strolling on a military base in Afghanistan. He got up, collected himself and brushed aside the concerns of fellow soldiers. Within months, Averella was stumbling regularly, and his hands began inexplicably clenching into fists. At first, tests revealed nothing. Three years ago, the Maryland soldier found out what was afflicting him: Lou Gehrig's disease. Once an intense weightlifter, Averella is now bedridden at his Glen Burnie apartment, every part of him dying but his mind.
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