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NEWS
November 15, 2012
Thomas F. Schaller's commentary ("Older, wealthier get plenty of 'free stuff,'" Nov. 14) is typical of the far-left position that everything an American citizen owns belongs to the federal government. He talks of "benefits" that the government bestows upon us peasants as magnanimous grants from on high which we may use to sustain ourselves. In my opinion, this is not the case. We citizens toil in our everyday life to earn a living. Taxes of any sort are an imposition by the government to maintain itself in order to serve its citizens.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Earlier today I commented on an article by Anne Curzan on people's objections to legitly , suggesting that you might want to lighten up.  But I know that slang leaves some of you tetchy, and, ever the helpful editor, I'd like to offer some relief.  Send me some of the slang words and cant phrases that go up your nose. I will use them in posts at this site. Once the Young People witness a palpable geezer adopting them, that will be the end. Think that that is just too cray-cray to work?
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SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Old guys everywhere have a little more swagger today. They're smiling more. Holding their heads a little higher. The reason? Jamie Moyer refuses to give up the ghost.  At age 49, the soft-tossing -- and that might be too generous a description -- lefty has signed a minor-league deal with the Orioles, emphasizing the idea that they'll have to cut the uniform from his cold, dead body before he retires from baseball. The man has now been pitching in the major leagues for 25 years.
NEWS
By Matthew McNabney | November 26, 2012
I turned 50 last month. As expected, I received many of the handshakes, high-fives, and other celebratory gestures befitting such a milestone. I also received a few of those special birthday cards. You know — those "humorous" cards that poke fun at presumed maladies that come with aging and which tend to focus on difficulties in the sexual and cognitive realms. These types of cards are plentiful at local card shops and drug stores, even my own hospital's gift shop. A presumed decline in one's physical and mental capabilities is built into these funny messages, which are designed to make us laugh at our situation.
NEWS
By Carl Bode | January 29, 1992
FIRST, let me establish my credentials as a geezer. I'm 80 years old -- the Big Eight-O -- with dimming eyesight. I value my credentials in America's fastest-growing group, the old folks.They have increasing, and in the eyes of some people, inordinate political power. The reason for that power is simple. The geezers come out to vote; the young folks don't. If you doubt my word, you have only to watch how delicately Congress tiptoes around such issues as Social Security, issues that might cause the geezer community to erupt like a nest of disturbed hornets.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF and ERNEST F. IMHOFF,Ernest Imhoff is readers' representative for The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 1992
One Geezer for Bush yells: "Tell me something good about Clinton." The gleeful answer from across the big table: "He's younger than anyone in this room.""I want a light beer," another Geezer tells the waiter. "Not a dark beer."Geezer No. 3 says, "Tell me something good about Bush." The shouted answer: "He fishes.""No, I want the tuna without the mayo," insists another Geezer.Former columnist Edgar Jones tries to take control. He jokes about the hard-hitting Sun editorial after Truman beat the Sun-backed Dewey in 1948.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 16, 2005
LADIES AND gentlemen ... the greatest geriatric rock 'n' roll band in the world, the Rolling Stones! C'mon, is this a terrific story or what? The Stones are launching another world tour? How old are these guys now? Let's see, Mick Jagger is 61. Charlie Watts is 63. Ron Wood is 58, which practically qualifies him for the kids' menu with this bunch. And of course poor Keith Richards is dead, having passed away some years ago while ... what's that? You say Keith Richards is still alive?
NEWS
By Joe Murray | September 20, 1996
ANGELINA COUNTY, Texas -- A geezer told this story. And geezers don't lie.He was doing the grocery shopping for his wife. Nowadays it's something married geezers like to do.Along with bread and milk, this and that, he decided to buy his wife a bouquet of flowers. Geezer that he is, he's amazed that grocery stores sell flowers.He pushed his buggy to the checkout line and waited his turn. As he reached the cash register, he couldn't help but notice that the young woman, what geezers call a girl, had the prettiest smile for her customers.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Earlier today I commented on an article by Anne Curzan on people's objections to legitly , suggesting that you might want to lighten up.  But I know that slang leaves some of you tetchy, and, ever the helpful editor, I'd like to offer some relief.  Send me some of the slang words and cant phrases that go up your nose. I will use them in posts at this site. Once the Young People witness a palpable geezer adopting them, that will be the end. Think that that is just too cray-cray to work?
NEWS
By Tom Tucker | September 7, 1995
I ORDERED fish recently at a fast food restaurant, and a 17-year-old waitress with a crew cut and an earring in her nose gave me the "Senior Citizen Discount" before you could say AARP.I'm a baby boomer, the folks born in the years 1946-64, after World War II. There are a lot of us.So you can understand my astonishment when I got a senior discount on lunch without being asked. I'm not even 50.When I was old enough to buy a six-pack, it really irked me to get "carded." Now, it's the reverse.
NEWS
November 15, 2012
Thomas F. Schaller's commentary ("Older, wealthier get plenty of 'free stuff,'" Nov. 14) is typical of the far-left position that everything an American citizen owns belongs to the federal government. He talks of "benefits" that the government bestows upon us peasants as magnanimous grants from on high which we may use to sustain ourselves. In my opinion, this is not the case. We citizens toil in our everyday life to earn a living. Taxes of any sort are an imposition by the government to maintain itself in order to serve its citizens.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Old guys everywhere have a little more swagger today. They're smiling more. Holding their heads a little higher. The reason? Jamie Moyer refuses to give up the ghost.  At age 49, the soft-tossing -- and that might be too generous a description -- lefty has signed a minor-league deal with the Orioles, emphasizing the idea that they'll have to cut the uniform from his cold, dead body before he retires from baseball. The man has now been pitching in the major leagues for 25 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | January 29, 2009
Let's pretend Sunday is already here. You're watching the big game on the requisite giant flat-screen TV. You're sitting in the requisite Starship Enterprise recliner with dual cup-holders. You're gorging on enough food to nauseate even the contestants on The Biggest Loser. Suddenly you hear those magical words: "Up next, the Super Bowl halftime show." OK, how do you react? If you're a baby boomer, you're thinking: "Great, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band!" If you're a Gen-Xer or Gen-Nexter or whatever the young call themselves these days, you roll your eyes, mutter, "Great, another geeze-fest" and go off to Twitter your friends about how lame the show is. This, friends, is the vast cultural divide that confronts us with these halftime shows.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | January 11, 2008
The Bucket List is 98 minutes of mawkish sentiment, a stream of greeting-card moments made palatable only because they come out of the mouths of Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman. Of course, a plumber's manual would sound interesting if recited by these two men; Nicholson would make it seem subversive, while Freeman would make it seem comforting. But in the end, it would still do nothing more than tell you how to fix a leaky pipe. So it is with this movie; even with all this Hollywood star power, it's still a series of "Happiness is ... " cliches and cuddly moments.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 16, 2005
LADIES AND gentlemen ... the greatest geriatric rock 'n' roll band in the world, the Rolling Stones! C'mon, is this a terrific story or what? The Stones are launching another world tour? How old are these guys now? Let's see, Mick Jagger is 61. Charlie Watts is 63. Ron Wood is 58, which practically qualifies him for the kids' menu with this bunch. And of course poor Keith Richards is dead, having passed away some years ago while ... what's that? You say Keith Richards is still alive?
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and John-Thor Dahlburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 28, 2004
PLANTATION, Fla. - He has been back from Iraq for more than a month, but Army Sgt. 1st Class Clarence Kugler still wears his desert combat boots. In fact, he finds them so comfortable that he has acquired six pairs. During his nine months in Baghdad with the 478th Civil Affairs Battalion, the 59-year-old Kugler, who also served in Vietnam, was identified as the oldest enlisted soldier in Iraq - a distinction he jokingly says no one may have wanted to challenge him for. When the noncom with the salt-and-pepper mustache, triathlete's rangy physique and ready quip retires in February at 60, another living link to the old U.S. military will have faded away.
FEATURES
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1996
Not just a brown bagOnce the marker of the perfect '50s female, cocktail bags have replaced the bulky shoulder bags and sleek backpacks of last season. They don't hold as much, and they demand at least one hand's attention -- but their worth is in their elegance. They add a retro look to suits and grace to evening wear. And unlike the basic black or brown of last year's bags, they come in plaids (like the Kate Spade design shown here), leopard prints and iridescent shades.Two accessories that some women can't get enough of have now inspired books -- two weighty, photo-filled, borderline-obsessive tomes, in fact.
NEWS
By Victor Paul Alvarez and Victor Paul Alvarez,Staff Writer | July 18, 1993
Sweating and pedaling his way up the hills of Arizona, with 600 miles of road behind him, Lester Marks longed for home.Two weeks into a 3,400-mile bicycle trip across America, he decided he had had enough. That night, he got a call in his hotel room from a buddy back home in Harford County, who talked him into climbing the next hill instead of turning away from it.So at 73, Mr. Marks, of Joppatowne, pedaled countless other hills -- and completed the 43-day journey from Los Angeles to Boston.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,Special to the Sun | December 8, 2002
These days, Santa's workshop isn't confined to the North Pole. It's also online. Geezer.com, a Web site showcasing the work of more than 1,400 senior artisans, is stocked for the holidays. While the location may be high-tech, the wares look as if they tumbled from St. Nick's sack -- teddy bears and wooden toys, hobby horses and sleds, dollhouses and checkerboards, more than 14,500 different products, all handcrafted by individuals old enough to remember when toys didn't need batteries.
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