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By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
This winter, Canada geese are eating the grass down to the bare ground on my waterfront. There's 15 feet of nothing but brown along the edge of the river. It looks terrible. How can I get rid of them? This is more than unsightly — it is Chesapeake Bay erosion and pollution in the making. (One goose produces a pound of droppings a day, and they can live 15-25 years.) Fortunately, the best times to address the problem are late winter before nesting begins or as soon as they appear.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
This winter, Canada geese are eating the grass down to the bare ground on my waterfront. There's 15 feet of nothing but brown along the edge of the river. It looks terrible. How can I get rid of them? This is more than unsightly — it is Chesapeake Bay erosion and pollution in the making. (One goose produces a pound of droppings a day, and they can live 15-25 years.) Fortunately, the best times to address the problem are late winter before nesting begins or as soon as they appear.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2010
A flock of geese collided with a double-decker Megabus traveling from White Marsh to New York City on Saturday morning, and passengers are hailing the driver as the "Sully" of ground transportation. The bus driver, Andre Sweeney, who was traveling along the New Jersey turnpike along Interstate 95, kept control of the bus after a goose smashed face-first into the windshield, cracking and destroying it. The bus jolted, but no passengers were injured. Sweeney sustained minor injuries, reporting glass in his eyes.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2011
Dredging of Columbia's 37-year-old Lake Elkhorn will resume, but curbing residential runoff that carries sediment and algae-producing nutrients into it is the key to its long-term health, a panel of four experts told a crowd composed mostly of Owen Brown residents Tuesday night. "We're going to need your help in restoring water quality," the Columbia Association's watershed director, John McCoy, told more than 80 people at the Owen Brown Interfaith Center. Lake Elkhorn, he said "was built to trap sediment, and it's done a very good job of that.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 30, 2003
A 17-year-old Ellicott City boy was arrested yesterday on charges that he killed two geese near Font Hill Park using a bow and arrow. Police said they discovered the teen-ager - who was not identified because he is a minor - in woods near the Ellicott City park Monday night holding a bow, arrows and a spotlight. He was arrested and charged with a hunting violation and with carrying a concealed deadly weapon, police said. On Wednesday, police received a call from a resident who found a dead goose near Font Hill Park that had been shot by an arrow.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | August 28, 1993
Suppose you had been living beyond your means for years when you hear you are about to get a windfall -- maybe enough that you could live reasonably well on the interest from it.You have no guarantee of much other future income, and you have to decide by next Wednesday -- invest most of the windfall, or treat yourself to one more good year and trust the future to fate.Maryland's government faces just such an imminent decision. If it were money we were talking about, neither the state nor most individuals would have trouble choosing the conservative course.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1995
How do you tell an owner that he lost a race because his horse stepped on a goose?That's the unlikely scenario that occurred at Laurel Park yesterday when Lizzie of Live Oak, nearing contention about halfway through the $20,500 feature, ran into a flock of geese that had wandered onto the track's turf course.These are not the graceful flamingos of Hialeah Park, but a band of fat Canada geese that normally hang near the infield pond and are usually content to stay there.But yesterday, hidden from the stewards' view by an infield willow tree, about a dozen of them had strolled onto the course near the five-eighths pole.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1997
Claiming the ruckus from their neighbors' feathered pets and wild birds is making them miserable, a Harwood couple is asking the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to impose some quiet on their upscale neighborhood.A racket from geese -- some kept as pets, others just visitors -- is so disruptive that Robert and Kathleen MacAdam say they "cannot sleep, study, read, converse or concentrate until the noise is stopped," according to a lawsuit filed yesterday.The couple is asking the court for an injunction to halt the honking coming from their neighbors' 4.5-acre property in the 200 block of S. River Clubhouse Road.
SPORTS
By John Husar and John Husar,Chicago Tribune | January 20, 1991
CHICAGO -- Ordinarily, the place to be next Sunday would be in a southern Illinois goose pit.That's when new rules kick in allowing hunters to shoot until sunset in the last five days of the quota zone season.These new rules were implemented to pursue sharply increased quotas designed to thin a burgeoning Canada goose flock that last year reached 900,000 in Illinois from 1.2 million in the Mississippi Flyway.In past years, goose flocks had learned some tricks of dealing with hunters near state and federal refuges.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
A mating pair of Aleutian Canada geese begin their journey today from the Baltimore Zoo to Russia, as part of an international effort to re-establish the rare and threatened birds in the Pacific islands off northern Asia.Fred Beall, curator of birds at the zoo, said the 8-year-old male and 7-year-old female will be shipped by plane to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Anchorage, Alaska. On Wednesday, wildlife experts will send the Baltimore birds and nine other mating pairs from other zoos to a newly built breeding center on Russia's Kamchatka peninsula.
NEWS
By Cindy Ross | April 4, 2011
The sky is beginning to glow pink as we bank the turn into the entrance of Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area in Pennsylvania. We hurry, not wanting to miss the show that is about to begin. Although we can't see the estimated 100,000 snow geese floating on the sheltered lagoon, we hear their communal voices. It's March, and these magnificent white birds are here for only a few weeks during their migratory passage to the Arctic. After resting and fattening up on local farm crops, they'll continue north to Canada's St. Lawrence River, ending eventually at their Alaskan mating and breeding grounds.
SPORTS
December 18, 2010
Reader John Sadler of Baltimore asks: Perhaps you can explain why, with so many resident Canada geese, we don't have a dedicated hunting season for them. Their offspring will never migrate, and soon they will be the only geese we see. Outdoors Girl turns to Larry Hindman , the Department of Natural Resources bird boss, who replies: These "resident" Canada geese are not geese that have lost the urge to migrate, as their migrant cousins do each fall and spring. Resident Canada geese are genetically different from migratory Canada geese.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2010
A flock of geese collided with a double-decker Megabus traveling from White Marsh to New York City on Saturday morning, and passengers are hailing the driver as the "Sully" of ground transportation. The bus driver, Andre Sweeney, who was traveling along the New Jersey turnpike along Interstate 95, kept control of the bus after a goose smashed face-first into the windshield, cracking and destroying it. The bus jolted, but no passengers were injured. Sweeney sustained minor injuries, reporting glass in his eyes.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
Rosemary Muir likes to dress up her goose. A school outfit in September. A tuxedo for formal occasions. A wedding gown when her daughter got married. And, of course, appropriate attire for the appropriate holiday. Muir bought her first and, she thought, her last 26-inch tall, 90-pound concrete goose two decades ago in Ohio and brought it with her to Howard County. Ten years ago, she and her husband took the prized lawn ornament to their new home on South Hanover Street, in South Baltimore's Otterbein.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun Reporter | December 18, 2006
TRAPPE -- For 30 years in a converted garage at a crossroads about halfway between Trappe and Easton, William Woodrow "Woody" Bramble Jr. has been doing the dirty work for Eastern Shore hunters. Right now, they are bringing geese to Bramble's Waterfowl Cleaning Service to be plucked, cleaned and bagged -sometimes all in less than 30 minutes - and made ready for the oven or freezer. When it comes to his rather messy craft, Bramble is downright blase. Livers and other slimy innards, assorted webbed feet and wings don't faze him. Feathers?
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 5, 2006
Leonardtown -- These days, Maryland's front line of defense against an invasion of the deadly bird flu looks, quite literally, like a wild goose chase. On foot, in trucks and by boat, a team of biologists from the Department of Natural Resources is swooping down on flocks of geese to test them for avian influenza, specifically Asian H5N1, a strain that has caused the death of more than 100 people and millions of birds overseas. Wildlife experts suspect that if the deadly form of the virus enters this country, it will most likely be through birds that mingle in the arctic during the breeding season before returning to their wintering grounds.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
It was a wild goose chase -- literally -- that did Bud in.The Columbia Association's border collie, hired two years ago to help keep the messy birds away from the heavily trafficked Town Center lakefront, injured himself on the job in June, sidelining him for six weeks during peak waterfowl patrol season.The gaggle took full advantage of Bud's absence, outpacing Bud's rookie replacement, the younger and less experienced Dart.Now, though Bud is back at work full time, the homeowners group is pondering a more drastic measure: chemical warfare.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | November 22, 1992
"Get ready, we're going to go after this bunch," Ray Marshall warned me between blasts from his goose call.I grabbed my 12-gauge Ruger and spotted the four big Canada geese circling our shore blind off Trappe Creek. They seemed to be working both sides of our rig -- a big spread of decoys in the creek and a smaller rig of silhouettes set in a harvested cornfield to our rear.Finally the geese set their wings, dropped their legs and committed themselves to the cornfield.I stood in the ground-level blind, brought the long-barreled smoothly to my shoulder, tracked the lead goose and slapped the trigger.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | March 17, 2006
A 20-year-old Columbia man has been charged with illegally dumping at least two dozen snow geese near a Columbia playground this month, a spokeswoman for Howard County police said yesterday. Edward Dillon of the 9600 block of Sea Shadow faces a misdemeanor dumping charge that carries a penalty of up to $1,000 or one year in jail, plus other littering charges. Dillon declined yesterday to comment. Police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn said that he told police that he received the geese from his boss, and that he had cut some of them up for food.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | March 12, 2006
Howard County police have opened an investigation into the illegal dumping of about two dozen dead snow geese at a Columbia playground this month, police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn said Friday. Maryland Department of Natural Resources police decided not to open a similar case last week after they found no evidence of illegal hunting. Snow geese have a liberal bag limit of 15 birds per hunter per day. Hunting season ended Feb. 25. Residents found the birds March 2 in Kings Contrivance village, and their deaths were first reported in the Columbia Flier.
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