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By Lou Cedrone | May 30, 1991
Geena Davis is particularly pleased with the role she has in ''Thelma and Louise,'' a road film currently playing at local theaters.She likes it because she and Susan Sarandon are the stars. They play women on the run from the law, and they carry the film. The men, well, they're supporting characters.''There are just not that many good roles for women,'' said Davis. ''This is one of the few good ones.''How about the role Demi Moore played in ''Ghost?"''Well, it was a good role. I don't want to diminish it in any way, but it was the male character who was going through it all,'' said Davis.
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NEWS
May 4, 2006
NATIONAL Moussaoui gets life in prison A federal jury spared the life of Zacarias Moussaoui, ensuring that the first person to be held accountable for the Sept. 11 terror attacks will spend a lifetime in prison. pg 1a Asbestos brakes spark fears A significant increase in imports of automobile brakes containing asbestos over the past decade is raising renewed concerns for the health of the nation's auto mechanics. pg 1a MARYLAND Utility to fix street damage The utility company that operates 16 miles of steam pipes below Baltimore announced yesterday plans to spend $6.6 million to upgrade its system and repair some of downtown's most beat-up roads.
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By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | June 30, 1992
Geena Davis has always had self-confidence. She'll be the first to say so.Moviegoers got their first glance of her in the hit comedy "Tootsie." She portrayed a bit player in the film's "General Hospital"-type soap opera, and when her character shared a dressing room with Dustin Hoffman's, he almost forgot he was supposed to be a woman.That was 10 years ago. Since then, she has won an Academy Award (for "The Accidental Tourist"), starred in a landmark film (last year's "Thelma & Louise"), is the major player in a hot summer movie ("A League of Their Own," opening tomorrow)
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 23, 2006
THE END OF THE TV SEASON begins this week and that means a certain kind of madness soon will descend upon our television screens. Beloved characters will die and story lines will take bizarre turns. Familiar casting lineups will be disrupted and long-time series shot down. A new online venture, which could transform the future of TV, will be launched. And it will seem as if there are new episodes of American Idol and Deal or No Deal airing every night of every week. May sweeps -- a 28-night programming blitz that marks the end of the network season and determines advertising rates (via audience measurements in 210 cities)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 11, 1996
"The Long Kiss Goodnight" is complete pagan entertainment: It feels as if it were written and directed by Druids after a long night of sacrificing virgins and chugging blood under the full moon out on some darkling plain.Naturally, I loved it: Completely irresponsible, utterly bereft of real-world logic, loud, unbearably violent yet undeniably fun. The best bad movie of the year, or the worst good one.Two cynics are behind it. The first is Shane Black, a screenwriter who specializes in mayhem and banter, the former always spectacular, the latter always played across a racial divide.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 4, 1994
"Angie," I says, shaddup awreaddy.The trials and tribulations of an unmarried woman in Brooklyn, "Angie" showcases Geena Davis in a convincingly against-type performance in a story that is unconvincingly with-type.To get into it, you have to love the Hollywood version of the working-class New York thing, which begins with the concept, derived from Damon Runyon stories of so long ago, that the Italian-Americans of Bensonhurst are quaint, amusing subtypes, FTC not human beings at all. You've got to love that hard yammer of Brooklynese as filtered through a sentimental Hollywood ear, where every th transmutes into a d and the standard form of rhetoric is verbal hostility.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 16, 1994
All right, Geena Davis, it's time to answer The Question. Have you now or have you ever heard of Mary Matalin and James Carville? No taking the Fifth, please, Ms. Davis.Davis gives one of those liquidly gulping laughs of hers -- it sounds like someone swallowing rather than sipping an expensive wine, while simultaneously humming "Whistle a Happy Tune" -- and allows that yes, she's heard of the famous Republican-Democrat campaign pro love-match and best-seller tandem (they worked for opposing sides during the 1992 presidential campaign)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 10, 2000
Between the see-through dress she wore to the Emmy Awards telecast and her new sitcom, "The Geena Davis Show," you have to wonder where Davis is getting her advice these days. What an awful series, and I'm not sure whether to blame her as executive producer and star or ABC for its hell-bent commitment to putting only Disney-produced-and-owned series like this one on its air. Davis plays Teddie Cochrane, who the press material describes as a "glamorous career woman." Her career involves running a "non-profit company that pairs celebrities with worthy political causes."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 1995
Because of a production error, the number of stars Sun Film Critic Stephen Hunter awarded to "Cutthroat Island," starring Geena Davis, was misrepresented in yesterday's Today section. The correct evaluation is 2 1/2 stars.* The Sun regrets the error.For sheer idiot bliss, no better vehicle can be found than "Cutthroat Island." It hasn't a brain in its pretty head, but it offers some of the best stunt and pyrotechnic work of the season, plus it features a lot of big ships, some of which blow up. You want more?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 25, 1995
What do you say about a man who hangs his wife by a rope 300 feet over the Caribbean on their honeymoon?Well, he's either very nasty or a movie director.Fortunately for Geena Davis, her husband is a movie director named Renny Harlin, and that's exactly what he did to her on "Cutthroat Island," the $80-million swashbuckler that's just opened."You have to put the stars in danger," says Harlin, the affable Finnish action mechanic who pulled the same stunts on people he wasn't sleeping with in "Cliffhanger" (Sylvester Stallone)
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | November 6, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Would you mind if we talk about Geena Davis? In a recent column, I spent a few minutes discussing her new TV show, Commander in Chief, in which she plays the first female president. My aim was to explore what this said about changing gender roles, but that wasn't how Frank, a reader of mine, took it. We had a brief exchange by e-mail, which I share with you now in its entirety: Frank: "Commander In Chief is about a liberal woman president. What is new? Hollywood loves liberals.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 25, 2005
THERE IS A NEW WOMAN ON television this fall. Defined more by intellect and competence than by physical beauty or her relationship to men, she belies depictions of women that have dominated prime-time television for more than 50 years. In several of the new fall programs, including ABC's Commander in Chief or Fox's Bones, the New Woman can be found in the Oval Office and the most rarefied realms of science and math, places few female characters have gone before. Yet, this empowered New Woman owes her existence in part to five inarguably sexy suburban housewives living on a TV cul-de-sac called Wisteria Lane, the five neighbors of ABC's Desperate Housewives.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 10, 2000
Between the see-through dress she wore to the Emmy Awards telecast and her new sitcom, "The Geena Davis Show," you have to wonder where Davis is getting her advice these days. What an awful series, and I'm not sure whether to blame her as executive producer and star or ABC for its hell-bent commitment to putting only Disney-produced-and-owned series like this one on its air. Davis plays Teddie Cochrane, who the press material describes as a "glamorous career woman." Her career involves running a "non-profit company that pairs celebrities with worthy political causes."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 17, 1999
"Stuart Little" the movie is less a literary adaptation than a licensing agreement come to computer-generated life.As a sop to contemporary youngsters with their famously brief attention spans and insatiable hunger for ever-accelerating action, the filmmakers of "Stuart Little" have taken E. B. White's original character -- a lovable white mouse who finds himself a member of a human family -- and put him into all sorts of situations that the author would never have dreamed of.Old fogies who were raised on the original book will no doubt dislike the changes, although the audience for which "Stuart Little" is intended will find little to complain about.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,Sun Staff | March 21, 1999
Tonight is Oscar night, and a few pressing questions will finally be answered: Who will be named Best Actress? Will "Saving Private Ryan" beat "Shakespeare in Love" for best picture? What will Whoopi wear?Winning an Academy Award is great, but Hollywood's biggest night is really an excuse for the average American to repeatedly scream at the television: "What the heck does she have on?!"Fashion has become so much a part of the Oscars and other award shows that it has spawned a new sartorial necessity: the celebrity stylist.
FEATURES
By Robert Dominguez and Robert Dominguez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 19, 1999
When it comes to Great Oscar Cat fights in History, Joan Rivers vs. Geena Davis is hardly Joan Crawford vs. Bette Davis.But with actress Geena Davis set to greet Academy Award hopefuls during ABC's new half-hour Oscar pre-show at 8 p.m. Sunday -- bumping Rivers off the red carpet during the last half-hour of her annual pre-show on cable's E! Entertainment channel -- the rival hosts have been exchanging catty quips worthy of the legendary hissing matches between Crawford and Bette Davis.Said Rivers about Geena Davis' new chores: "She may turn out to be fabulous -- there may be more to her than dimples and [breasts]
NEWS
By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | October 20, 1996
Geena Davis sums up her movie-star approach and appeal as well as anyone: "Well, why don't we see what else a woman can get away with on screen?"In her 14-year career, Davis seems to have dedicated her career to smashing stereotypes.The current target is the traditionally masculine action genre, which gets a jolt from Davis and her husband, director Renny Harlin, in "The Long Kiss Goodnight." Last time out, it was 1995's "Cutthroat Island," a curiously old-fashioned piracy adventure with Davis as one of the lead swashbucklers.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 25, 2005
THERE IS A NEW WOMAN ON television this fall. Defined more by intellect and competence than by physical beauty or her relationship to men, she belies depictions of women that have dominated prime-time television for more than 50 years. In several of the new fall programs, including ABC's Commander in Chief or Fox's Bones, the New Woman can be found in the Oval Office and the most rarefied realms of science and math, places few female characters have gone before. Yet, this empowered New Woman owes her existence in part to five inarguably sexy suburban housewives living on a TV cul-de-sac called Wisteria Lane, the five neighbors of ABC's Desperate Housewives.
NEWS
By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | October 20, 1996
Geena Davis sums up her movie-star approach and appeal as well as anyone: "Well, why don't we see what else a woman can get away with on screen?"In her 14-year career, Davis seems to have dedicated her career to smashing stereotypes.The current target is the traditionally masculine action genre, which gets a jolt from Davis and her husband, director Renny Harlin, in "The Long Kiss Goodnight." Last time out, it was 1995's "Cutthroat Island," a curiously old-fashioned piracy adventure with Davis as one of the lead swashbucklers.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 11, 1996
"The Long Kiss Goodnight" is complete pagan entertainment: It feels as if it were written and directed by Druids after a long night of sacrificing virgins and chugging blood under the full moon out on some darkling plain.Naturally, I loved it: Completely irresponsible, utterly bereft of real-world logic, loud, unbearably violent yet undeniably fun. The best bad movie of the year, or the worst good one.Two cynics are behind it. The first is Shane Black, a screenwriter who specializes in mayhem and banter, the former always spectacular, the latter always played across a racial divide.
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