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By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2001
Raised in a rough Wilmington, Del. neighborhood, the Rev. John R. "Jack" Sharp's views were salted by experience. Sharp was brought up by his blind and frail grandmother, and no matter how bad things became, he said, "the church on the corner was there for us." So it made sense that Sharp - the man shepherding the redevelopment of the Memorial Stadium site - felt called to church service. In what he calls a "justice ministry," he worked for civil rights and against the Vietnam War and nuclear weapons in the 1960s and 1970s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | October 12, 2003
A couple of celebrity stop-overs created quite a stir, and raised a few bucks, for a couple of worthy Charm City causes. Rita Moreno was this year's guest star at the "Annual GEDCO Senator Theatre Classic," which raises money for Govans Ecumenical Development Corporation. GEDCO executive director Julie Pierson says the vivacious 71-year-old singer / dancer / actress made a point of visiting every table at the dinner, graciously posing for photos and signing autographs. "She was a real delight," Julie says.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2000
It's hard to believe that Lucille Baudot is 84. She's blond and elegant and energetic with a sly sense of humor. Baudot was also once accused of having "volunteeritis," a condition that hasn't changed in decades. Since 1989, Baudot has been a tireless volunteer for the Govans Ecumenical Development Corporation. "I'm always doing something that's helping somebody who is less fortunate," she says. Baudot wears her efforts not on her sleeve, but on her lapel. Everywhere Baudot goes, she sells one-of-a-kind "House Pins" designed by a formerly homeless woman in Maine to raise money for GEDCO and other housing groups.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
After four years of sometimes angry debate over the future of the Memorial Stadium site, a church-based nonprofit prevailed yesterday as the state Board of Public Works approved the city selling the property to Govans Ecumenical Development Corp. for $728,000. Construction of a mixed-income senior housing community for 500 is slated to begin on the eastern edge of the 30-acre cleared parcel this fall, GEDCO officials said yesterday. Work on the city's largest YMCA recreational facility will begin on the southwest corner in the spring.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1999
City officials were to meet today with representatives of Govans Ecumenical Development Corp. to discuss the group's plan to redevelop the Memorial Stadium site.Neighborhood groups have expressed optimism about GEDCO's proposal -- called Stadium Place -- to build a YMCA and a retirement community on the site of the stadium where the football Colts and baseball Orioles played for more than four decades.GEDCO, a nonprofit church-based organization, won a competition this year with a proposal to turn the stadium into a complex that includes housing for senior citizens with low to moderate incomes and a 45,000-square-foot YMCA for all ages.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2002
Following the city's recommendation, the Maryland Stadium Authority approved yesterday a reduced purchase price of $728,000 for the sale of the Memorial Stadium site to a church-based nonprofit in North Baltimore. Pending state approval, Govans Ecumenical Development Corp. will purchase the site for about one-third of what it had proposed to pay in 1999, when city officials were pondering what to do with the prime piece of city real estate. GEDCO plans to build a senior housing community on the site, which has been the source of political and community squabbling for years.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2002
Faced with criticism from state officials skeptical of the purchase price, officials of a nonprofit group looking to buy the Memorial Stadium site say they are willing to provide all documents concerning the sale and their proposed development of the prime piece of city real estate. Govans Ecumenical Development Corp. a church-based nonprofit organization in North Baltimore, is looking in coming weeks to clear its final hurdle, state approval, for the purchase of the East 33rd Street site.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Jamie Stiehm and Neal Thompson and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
Mayor Martin O'Malley plunged further into the tempest over Memorial Stadium's future yesterday, crafting a compromise that could preserve some of the beloved brick facade but angering preservationists who vowed to fight any demolition. After meeting with O'Malley last night, representatives of Preservation Maryland said that the mayor's plan doesn't save enough of the stadium and that they are preparing to seek an injunction as early as today to stop the structure's destruction. O'Malley had told city and state officials yesterday that his compromise would include exploring future construction of a bike-racing track on the site, a project long sought by area bicyclists and those behind the city's bid for the 2012 Olympics.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
After four years of sometimes angry debate over the future of the Memorial Stadium site, a church-based nonprofit prevailed yesterday as the state Board of Public Works approved the city selling the property to Govans Ecumenical Development Corp. for $728,000. Construction of a mixed-income senior housing community for 500 is slated to begin on the eastern edge of the 30-acre cleared parcel this fall, GEDCO officials said yesterday. Work on the city's largest YMCA recreational facility will begin on the southwest corner in the spring.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
The nonprofit group hoping to redevelop the Memorial Stadium site passed another hurdle this week when its financing plans were approved by Baltimore officials.The Govans Ecumenical Development Corp. (GEDCO), which wants to turn the site into a senior center and YMCA, presented a proposal outlining the financing for the plan to the city Department of Housing and Community Development on Monday.The nonprofit, church-based group won a city government-sponsored competition this year with its proposal to turn the storied stadium site, former home to the Baltimore Colts and Orioles, into a campus including housing for low- and moderate-income senior citizens and a 45,000-square-foot YMCA for all ages.
NEWS
September 23, 2002
GEDCO is ready to proceed with Stadium Place In response to the article "Group offers to show stadium project papers to skeptical officials" (Sept. 11), it is important to note that the Govans Ecumenical Development Corp. (GEDCO) is ready to begin construction on the Stadium Place site as soon as the Board of Public Works votes on the land price agreement. GEDCO has been working on this development for four years, and has developed broad and deep support from foundations, community groups, congregations and public officials.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2002
Faced with criticism from state officials skeptical of the purchase price, officials of a nonprofit group looking to buy the Memorial Stadium site say they are willing to provide all documents concerning the sale and their proposed development of the prime piece of city real estate. Govans Ecumenical Development Corp. a church-based nonprofit organization in North Baltimore, is looking in coming weeks to clear its final hurdle, state approval, for the purchase of the East 33rd Street site.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2002
Following the city's recommendation, the Maryland Stadium Authority approved yesterday a reduced purchase price of $728,000 for the sale of the Memorial Stadium site to a church-based nonprofit in North Baltimore. Pending state approval, Govans Ecumenical Development Corp. will purchase the site for about one-third of what it had proposed to pay in 1999, when city officials were pondering what to do with the prime piece of city real estate. GEDCO plans to build a senior housing community on the site, which has been the source of political and community squabbling for years.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Gady A. Epstein and Jamie Stiehm and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2001
In what may symbolize a turning point in the saga of Memorial Stadium, top aides to Mayor Martin O'Malley met yesterday with veterans, the site's developer, preservationists and Northeast Baltimore neighborhood leaders to discuss the fate of the dedication wall. Until recently, it appeared that the 10-story wall with stainless-steel lettering would remain standing as part of an agreement brokered by O'Malley in March between the site's developer and preservationists. The state has since spent $750,000 to reinforce the wall.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2001
Raised in a rough Wilmington, Del. neighborhood, the Rev. John R. "Jack" Sharp's views were salted by experience. Sharp was brought up by his blind and frail grandmother, and no matter how bad things became, he said, "the church on the corner was there for us." So it made sense that Sharp - the man shepherding the redevelopment of the Memorial Stadium site - felt called to church service. In what he calls a "justice ministry," he worked for civil rights and against the Vietnam War and nuclear weapons in the 1960s and 1970s.
NEWS
March 20, 2001
Comptroller William Donald Schaefer, a former mayor of Baltimore and governor of Maryland, spoke recently over breakfast at Jimmy's Restaurant in Fells Point with Richard C. Gross, editor of the Opinion Commentary page. The discussion focused on events in the city and the state. The battle for Memorial Stadium has been lost. What happens now? You're right in saying it's lost. But it really never had a chance. I remember ... I asked the mayor (Martin O'Malley) to have a meeting with [developer]
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1999
It wasn't the first place you'd expect to hear a pitch from a developer trying to win a competition for one of the largest available pieces of real estate in Baltimore -- 30 acres of city-owned land including Memorial Stadium.It was Good Friday in Govans Presbyterian Church, and the Rev. John R. Sharp was preaching about the consideration Jesus showed his mother while he was dying on the cross.Sharp, a pastor and president of the Govans Ecumenical Development Corp., said the nonprofit organization's motive for planning the 472-unit Stadium Place retirement community was similar to Jesus' motive in asking a disciple to care for his aging mother.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2001
Days before the scheduled demolition of Memorial Stadium, the redeveloper signaled yesterday that it would accept the Abell Foundation's offer to study ways to salvage part of the brick horseshoe structure while still building a senior housing community and YMCA. In a compromise that has the blessing of Mayor Martin O'Malley, Comptroller William Donald Schaefer and preservationists bent on saving the monument to veterans, Govans Ecumenical Development Corp. officials said they would work with Abell and HOK Architects to survey whether substantial savings might result if a portion of the complex were to remain on 33rd Street.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Jamie Stiehm and Caitlin Francke and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2001
The demolition of Memorial Stadium resumed yesterday morning as preservationists lost a last-minute court hearing to halt destruction of the lauded landmark. Wrecking crews began work about 11 a.m., bringing down portions of the left outfield bleachers. The demolition started at the order of Mayor Martin O'Malley, who had tried to craft a compromise with preservationists and developers Thursday night. An agreement was reached to save the war memorial portion of the facade, but preservationists want more.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Jamie Stiehm and Neal Thompson and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
Mayor Martin O'Malley plunged further into the tempest over Memorial Stadium's future yesterday, crafting a compromise that could preserve some of the beloved brick facade but angering preservationists who vowed to fight any demolition. After meeting with O'Malley last night, representatives of Preservation Maryland said that the mayor's plan doesn't save enough of the stadium and that they are preparing to seek an injunction as early as today to stop the structure's destruction. O'Malley had told city and state officials yesterday that his compromise would include exploring future construction of a bike-racing track on the site, a project long sought by area bicyclists and those behind the city's bid for the 2012 Olympics.
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