Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGdp
IN THE NEWS

Gdp

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 23, 2014
A recent editorial ( "Maryland's stagnant economy," June 12) and news article ( "A bumpy year for Maryland's economy," June 15) made some valid points about Maryland's economy but overlooked much of the work done in recent years to expand new and emerging pillars of the state's job base. The editorial suggested that Maryland pursue "a blended approach where a sector with enormous growth potential like cybersecurity … is cultivated not only by government-funded organizations like the National Security Agency at Fort Meade and Maryland's research universities but by fostering private investment and entrepreneurship, start-ups and business incubators.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 23, 2014
A recent editorial ( "Maryland's stagnant economy," June 12) and news article ( "A bumpy year for Maryland's economy," June 15) made some valid points about Maryland's economy but overlooked much of the work done in recent years to expand new and emerging pillars of the state's job base. The editorial suggested that Maryland pursue "a blended approach where a sector with enormous growth potential like cybersecurity … is cultivated not only by government-funded organizations like the National Security Agency at Fort Meade and Maryland's research universities but by fostering private investment and entrepreneurship, start-ups and business incubators.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2011
Maryland's gross domestic product — a key measurement of economic strength — grew faster than the national average last year after dipping in recessionary 2009, the federal government said Tuesday. Maryland's GDP increased 2.9 percent in 2010, ranking it sixteenth among the states, according to estimates from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis that could be revised later. Nationwide, GDP grew 2.6 percent last year. The state's GDP shrank a little less than 1 percent in 2009.
NEWS
June 17, 2014
The Sun's business section offered an interesting juxtaposition of articles on the front page recently. One explained how the state's gross domestic product is among the lowest in the nation while another article observed a fight over a shopping center ( "Retail battle declared in White Marsh," June 15). In the retail battle article, the owners of a mall in White Marsh came out against the building of a new "outlet mall" because they believe that it will take away business from their retail clients.
NEWS
June 17, 2014
The Sun's business section offered an interesting juxtaposition of articles on the front page recently. One explained how the state's gross domestic product is among the lowest in the nation while another article observed a fight over a shopping center ( "Retail battle declared in White Marsh," June 15). In the retail battle article, the owners of a mall in White Marsh came out against the building of a new "outlet mall" because they believe that it will take away business from their retail clients.
BUSINESS
By Maura Reynolds and Maura Reynolds,Tribune Washington Bureau | January 30, 2009
WASHINGTON - Bad economic news just keeps piling up. Yesterday alone, three new milestones were reached: The number of workers filing unemployment claims hit an all-time high, sales of new homes reached an all-time low, and production of durable goods fell for the fifth straight month, boosting inventories to the highest level since the government began to keep count in 1992. And it's not over. Today, when the Commerce Department releases its initial estimate of gross domestic product - that is, the value of all goods and services produced by the economy - for the fourth quarter of last year, it will essentially wrap into one, sobering number all the grim developments that have been accumulating in recent weeks and months.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | September 27, 2007
Baltimore ranked 19th among metro areas in 2005 on an important measure of economic activity - up one notch from the year before. The numbers, released yesterday by the Commerce Department, represent the government's first-ever attempt to calculate gross domestic product for the country's 363 metropolitan areas. GDP is a tally of the value of goods and services produced. The government warned that the numbers are "experimental," but it intends to continue producing them. "There are many metropolitan areas that haven't seen an estimate of the size of their economy, and they don't have a clear picture of how their economy ranks," said Sharon Panek, chief of the section on GDP by state services at Commerce's Bureau of Economic Analysis.
BUSINESS
By Eleanor Yang | July 13, 1997
ECONOMIC theorists have often stood by their numbers, but what happens when they're off by almost $100 billion? For some, it means panic. For others, it's just old news.The gap is between the two broadest indicators of the health of the country's $8 trillion economy -- the gross domestic product and the gross domestic income.The more commonly known GDP is the sum of the value of products and services produced in the United States. GDI measures how much is being earned from the sale of those products and services.
BUSINESS
By JAMES P. MILLER AND MARY UMBERGER and JAMES P. MILLER AND MARY UMBERGER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 26, 2006
Providing further evidence of the U.S. economy's slowing momentum, federal officials revised yesterday first-quarter gross domestic product growth upward by a lower-than-expected amount. The slightly disappointing GDP data, combined with a separate report that showed a continuing decline in existing-home sales, may play a role in the Federal Reserve's pending decision on whether to pause its long series of interest-rate increases. The Fed's rate-setting committee next meets June 28 and 29. A month ago, the Commerce Department originally reported that the nation's gross domestic product, the measure of all goods and services produced in the U.S., expanded at a vigorous 4.8 percent rate in the first quarter, the strongest quarterly performance in 2 1/2 years.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy grew faster than first estimated in the third quarter, fueled by a consumer spending surge and low inflation that are likely to make the current expansion the longest on record in peacetime, reports issued yesterday showed.The gross domestic product, the total output of goods and services, rose at a 3.9 percent annual rate in the quarter, more than doubling the second-quarter pace of 1.8 percent, the Commerce Department said. A narrower-than-estimated trade deficit and stronger consumer spending on durable goods accounted for much of the upward revision from the initial estimate of a 3.3 percent gain in GDP for the quarter.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Maryland's economy has grown almost without fail in the last quarter-century, ticking up year after year. But not in 2013. That's according to early estimates from the U.S. Department of Commerce, which showed Maryland's gross domestic product stagnating last year - putting the state near the bottom of the national pack. Only the District of Columbia and Alaska fared worse. It's another indication that 2013 wasn't great for Maryland, where federal budget cuts had an outsized effect because of the state's big cluster of federal contractors and agencies.
NEWS
June 12, 2014
The latest report from the U.S. Department of Commerce reveals that Maryland's gross domestic product or GDP, a primary measure of the economy's health, was unchanged in 2013. That zero growth rate caused Maryland to be ranked second to last among all 50 states for GDP growth last year, an abysmal showing by any standard. The news will likely be cheered by only one group, the Republicans running for state and local office who have been lambasting Maryland's allegedly unfriendly business climate and tax increases since the last economic recession for driving everyone from small business owners to retirees away.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
My favorite story in The Baltimore Sun last week was by my colleague Eileen Ambrose , reporting on how Marylanders are a bunch of whiners, at least according to a state-by-state breakdown of the complaints received by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Predictably enough, the story drew a few online comments, most of which were complaints themselves. Yes, complaints about a story about complaints, leading inevitably to complaints about other commenters' complaints.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
In response to your editorial "Put up or shut up" (April 11), I just have one question: What part of economics don't you understand? You mention that the president wants to "reduce deficits to a manageable size. " Yet in his budget he proposes growing government spending by 60 percent from 2012 to 2023, and increasing revenues by 113 percent. And he still can't balance the budget! This budget makes the argument that we need more government and more debt. His proposal leaves us with gross debt of more than 100 percent of GDP by 2020 (it was 40 percent of GDP in 2008 and is projected to be almost 80 percent of GDP next year)
EXPLORE
October 11, 2012
Letter after letter is published in your paper supporting the president, despite the fact that they are all just regurgitated talking points of the Democrat Party. The latest is the new 7.8 percent unemployment rate. Nothing could be further from the truth. You see, in order for the unemployment rate to drop, the economy must be growing. The most common measurement is Gross Domestic Product, or GDP. The current GDP is 1.3 percent down from the last published GDP of 1.7 percent. The economy is shrinking, not growing.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | January 31, 2012
One of the memorable slogans from the Reagan administration was "peace through strength. " President Ronald Reagan believed a strong defense was a safeguard against enemy attacks and the best hope of victory should America go to war. President Barack Obama is taking the opposite approach. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta recently announced cuts in defense spending of $487 billion over the next 10 years. Supposedly, these cuts will reduce the federal deficit, but Congress always finds new ways to spend money, so I am not optimistic.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 28, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy, weighed down in the second quarter by a strike at General Motors Corp. and a slowdown in exports to Asia, still was able to grow at a faster pace than previously estimated.The gross domestic product, the total output of goods and services, rose at a revised 1.6 percent annual rate in the second quarter, the Commerce Department said yesterday. That's higher than the initial GDP estimate of a 1.4 percent gain released July 31 -- though still a shadow of the first quarter's stellar 5.5 percent growth rate.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 27, 2005
The nation's economy grew at a 3.5 percent rate in the first quarter, a stronger performance than estimates had suggested, the Commerce Department said yesterday. The report helped ease recent concerns that the economy's momentum might be flagging. Late last month, in its initial "advance" report, the government said the nation's gross domestic product grew at a lower-than-expected rate of 3.1 percent. Yesterday, however, Commerce said that after a routine fine-tuning of its preliminary figures, the revised data indicate that the GDP's growth rate was actually a stronger 3.5 percent.
NEWS
August 29, 2011
Brian Murphy suggests that if the super-rich were taxed more heavily they would move away ("Warren Buffett is wrong," Aug. 25). I don't believe that. California has higher taxes than Oklahoma, yet the super-rich still prefer California to Oklahoma. Second, moving from Maryland to Delaware is one thing, but moving to Haiti to avoid federal taxes - the country has the lowest tax take in the Western hemisphere - is another thing altogether. There is simply no data to back up the theory that the rich will flee if the United States it raises taxes on the wealthy and super-wealthy a little more.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2011
Maryland's gross domestic product — a key measurement of economic strength — grew faster than the national average last year after dipping in recessionary 2009, the federal government said Tuesday. Maryland's GDP increased 2.9 percent in 2010, ranking it sixteenth among the states, according to estimates from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis that could be revised later. Nationwide, GDP grew 2.6 percent last year. The state's GDP shrank a little less than 1 percent in 2009.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.