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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 1996
GDANSK, Poland -- Under the Communists, this city and its shipyard served as the fulcrum of opposition, the center of defiance. Now the city thrives, but the shipyard is on the verge of bankruptcy and stands, dispirited, as an emblem of decline.In the coming months, at least 2,000 employees will be laid off, and half of the sprawling site of antiquated cranes, dank workshops and shaky overhead bridges will be closed.As workers poured out of the iron gates and the weak spring sun glinted off the Solidarity monument of three tall steel crosses hung with three steel ship anchors, the mood was of worn resignation.
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FEATURES
August 31, 2004
Aug. 31 1886: An earthquake rocked Charleston, S.C., killing up to 110 people. 1888: Mary Ann Nicholls was found murdered in London's East End in what is generally regarded as the first slaying committed by Jack the Ripper. 1935: President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an act prohibiting the export of U.S. arms to belligerents. 1980: Poland's Solidarity labor movement was born with an agreement signed in Gdansk that ended a 17-day-old strike. 1985: Richard Ramirez, later convicted of California's Night Stalker killings, was captured by residents of an East Los Angeles neighborhood.
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FEATURES
August 31, 2004
Aug. 31 1886: An earthquake rocked Charleston, S.C., killing up to 110 people. 1888: Mary Ann Nicholls was found murdered in London's East End in what is generally regarded as the first slaying committed by Jack the Ripper. 1935: President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an act prohibiting the export of U.S. arms to belligerents. 1980: Poland's Solidarity labor movement was born with an agreement signed in Gdansk that ended a 17-day-old strike. 1985: Richard Ramirez, later convicted of California's Night Stalker killings, was captured by residents of an East Los Angeles neighborhood.
FEATURES
August 31, 2000
Today in history: Aug. 31 In 1886, an earthquake rocked Charleston, S.C., killing up to 110 people. In 1887, Thomas A. Edison received a patent for his Kinetoscope, a device that produced moving pictures. In 1888, Mary Ann Nicholls was found murdered in London's East End in what is generally regarded as the first slaying committed by Jack the Ripper. In 1935, President Franklin Roosevelt signed an act prohibiting the export of U.S. arms to belligerents. In 1954, Hurricane Carol hit the northeastern United States, resulting in nearly 70 deaths.
FEATURES
August 31, 2000
Today in history: Aug. 31 In 1886, an earthquake rocked Charleston, S.C., killing up to 110 people. In 1887, Thomas A. Edison received a patent for his Kinetoscope, a device that produced moving pictures. In 1888, Mary Ann Nicholls was found murdered in London's East End in what is generally regarded as the first slaying committed by Jack the Ripper. In 1935, President Franklin Roosevelt signed an act prohibiting the export of U.S. arms to belligerents. In 1954, Hurricane Carol hit the northeastern United States, resulting in nearly 70 deaths.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | December 10, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Lech Walesa, the shipyard electrician who was a political prisoner nine years ago, was elected president of Poland yesterday.The Solidarity leader overwhelmingly beat his rival, Polish-Canadian businessman Stanislaw Tyminski, in a runoff after the first round of balloting two weeks ago.Mr. Walesa won 75 percent of the vote, compared with Mr. Tyminski's 25 percent, and at last Poland got a freely elected president to succeed Communist Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski."I always said I would get between 70 and 80 percent," Mr. Walesa joked in his hometown of Gdansk late last evening.
NEWS
By Lori Montgomery and Lori Montgomery,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 5, 1999
GDANSK, Poland -- Lech Walesa, legendary hero of the anti-Communist Solidarity movement, former president of Poland and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, is sitting at his big wooden desk pretending to read a newspaper.He flips through the pages and rattles them impatiently. He sips his coffee, then rattles the paper again. Head down, eyebrows raised, he barely notices his visitors. Who has time to notice such things? Not Walesa, a busy man on the go.But on this recent gloomy day, Lech Walesa is going nowhere.
NEWS
By ALICE CORNETT | September 7, 1992
London, Kentucky -- After 14 years of silence, it may now b possible to learn the fate of Vladimir Klebanov, the coal miner who in 1978 formed the first free labor union in the Communist bloc.The union was short-lived, as was Klebanov's freedom. If still alive, he can perhaps appreciate the irony of Lech Walesa's election to power in Poland. More than two years before the Gdansk shipyard workers organized Solidarity, the Ukrainian miner, together with a handful of workers from other trades, boldly announced the formation of the Union for the Defense of Workers' Rights.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | March 7, 1993
When you think of small European villages, you think of crowded market squares and stalls piled high with fresh meats and fragrant produce. You can almost hear the farmers' wives chatting up the customers and extolling the quality of today's rutabagas.But the concept of a farmers market is something foreign and mysterious to Polish farmers, according to Baltimore County Extension Agent G. Richard Curran, on a six-month tour of duty in Poland with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.After nearly 50 years of communism, he said, Polish farmers must be taught how to market their own produce.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to the Sun | September 18, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Lech Walesa, the charismatic shipyard electrician who led the Solidarity labor union in its 10-year struggle to oust the Communists from power here, announced yesterday his candidacy for the presidency of Poland."
NEWS
By Lori Montgomery and Lori Montgomery,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 5, 1999
GDANSK, Poland -- Lech Walesa, legendary hero of the anti-Communist Solidarity movement, former president of Poland and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, is sitting at his big wooden desk pretending to read a newspaper.He flips through the pages and rattles them impatiently. He sips his coffee, then rattles the paper again. Head down, eyebrows raised, he barely notices his visitors. Who has time to notice such things? Not Walesa, a busy man on the go.But on this recent gloomy day, Lech Walesa is going nowhere.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 1996
GDANSK, Poland -- Under the Communists, this city and its shipyard served as the fulcrum of opposition, the center of defiance. Now the city thrives, but the shipyard is on the verge of bankruptcy and stands, dispirited, as an emblem of decline.In the coming months, at least 2,000 employees will be laid off, and half of the sprawling site of antiquated cranes, dank workshops and shaky overhead bridges will be closed.As workers poured out of the iron gates and the weak spring sun glinted off the Solidarity monument of three tall steel crosses hung with three steel ship anchors, the mood was of worn resignation.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | March 7, 1993
When you think of small European villages, you think of crowded market squares and stalls piled high with fresh meats and fragrant produce. You can almost hear the farmers' wives chatting up the customers and extolling the quality of today's rutabagas.But the concept of a farmers market is something foreign and mysterious to Polish farmers, according to Baltimore County Extension Agent G. Richard Curran, on a six-month tour of duty in Poland with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.After nearly 50 years of communism, he said, Polish farmers must be taught how to market their own produce.
NEWS
By ALICE CORNETT | September 7, 1992
London, Kentucky -- After 14 years of silence, it may now b possible to learn the fate of Vladimir Klebanov, the coal miner who in 1978 formed the first free labor union in the Communist bloc.The union was short-lived, as was Klebanov's freedom. If still alive, he can perhaps appreciate the irony of Lech Walesa's election to power in Poland. More than two years before the Gdansk shipyard workers organized Solidarity, the Ukrainian miner, together with a handful of workers from other trades, boldly announced the formation of the Union for the Defense of Workers' Rights.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | December 10, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- Lech Walesa, the shipyard electrician who was a political prisoner nine years ago, was elected president of Poland yesterday.The Solidarity leader overwhelmingly beat his rival, Polish-Canadian businessman Stanislaw Tyminski, in a runoff after the first round of balloting two weeks ago.Mr. Walesa won 75 percent of the vote, compared with Mr. Tyminski's 25 percent, and at last Poland got a freely elected president to succeed Communist Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski."I always said I would get between 70 and 80 percent," Mr. Walesa joked in his hometown of Gdansk late last evening.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | January 5, 1991
WARSAW, Poland -- The Polish Parliament approved yesterday Lech Walesa's choice for the premiership of Poland.Gdansk businessman Jan Krzysztof Bielecki vowed to form a government of technocrats and to move farther toward a market economy after parliamentary deputies, including former Communists, voted 276-58 to ratify his appointment.Only the large Poland Peasants Party, which had vainly demanded four Cabinet posts and a government drawn from the ranks of Parliament, voted as a bloc against him.Indicative of the split within the Solidarity movement after the recent bitter presidential campaign was the abstention of former Solidarity adviser Adam Michnik and other supporters of outgoing Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 9, 1997
GDANSK, Poland -- If opinion polls are right, the enfeebled Solidarity opposition is staging a stunning political turnaround. There is even serious talk of a Solidarity-led coalition taking back the Polish Parliament in elections next fall.That would be a momentous comeback for the trade-union-based popular movement, which brought down communism in 1989 only to be swept to the sidelines by its revamped Communist adversaries in elections.But what is most striking about Solidarity's long-awaited rebounding is the absence of its most famous figure.
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